Andreas Frank’s Manipulated Photos Exhibited Underwater In A Sunken Ship

A little while ago, Andreas Frank took a dive down to the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a  United States missile tracking ship that was recently sunk 7 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida in order to create an artificial reef. While he was down there, Frank, who is a successful commercial photographer, took pictures of the wreck. He used the resulting images as the basis for a series of digitally manipulated photos depicting various underwater happenings on the sunken ship. The cool part: he then staged an exhibition of the photos on the deck of the ship! Divers took in the exhibit in full scuba gear. I’m not sure that bobbing up and down under water is the best way to take in Frank’s work, but it is kinda cool. See more photos from the Vandenberg- Life Below the Surface show after the jump, as well as a video of divers checking out the pictures while down by the ship.

The Mystical Dreams and Mythologies of Ryan Samuel Carr

Ryan Samuel Carr is a native artist/illustrator of Ventura, California.  Ryan’s beautiful line work and dreamy figurative elements remain a constant reoccurring theme throughout his extensive body of work.  When I look at Ryan’s work, even if the subject matter is just the roots in a pile of weeds he always seems to capture a rare and very sincere moment only hinting at whatever secrets the particular root, or bed of flowers have to say.  Ryan’s unique line work evokes so much feeling and emotional manifestations.  Ryan shares a bit of his mark making process in this direct quote from the talented young artist himself:

“I think a lot about the ‘immediacy’ of drawing (with ink and pencils), and the individual mark in a moment of time; what that all says…it’s very mystical and meditative for me.”

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Eric Nehr’s Egon Schiele-Inspired Fashion Shoot

Here are a few images from a 2009 fashion shoot by Eric Nehr modeled directly after the works of Egon Schiele. For some reason, these snaps expose Schiele’s notorious vanity even further. But of course no one does self portraits like he did, with his writhing, angular paintings full of turn-of-the-century angst. A nice tribute. (via)

New Kersplat And Chains Artist Prints!

The Art Nouveau Sensibilities of Jugend Magazine

 

We’re not in the habit of sharing stuff that’s not contemporary here, but sometimes you come along something that shouldn’t be overlooked, as it seems relevant no matter when it was created, and could use a little more attention. Jugendstil, the German Art Nouveau movement, was named after the late nineteenth century literary magazine Jugend, which promoted the aesthetic within its pages and on its covers. If you’re looking for some fresh typography/design/illustration inspiration, check out this online resource, which contains lots of images from and info on the magazine. There’s even some Impressionistic stuff mixed with the Art Nouveau goodness, but it all comes off as really fresh. I wonder what Jugend, which didn’t make it out of World War II and Nazism, would be like if it were around today.

Instant Hutong’s Colorful Blinking City Stencil Re-Imagines Maps and Urban Space

 

Blinking City is an ongoing project from Instant Hutong that challenges the traditional concepts involved in map making by re-imagining and creating new context around maps of downtown Beijing. Above (and after the jump), are a few images of a stencil piece created in conjunction with Blinking City. Bright colors bleed slightly into one another but maintain their own strength in an orbicular representation of a Beijing neighborhood. The project is awesome and full of good intentions. From the site: “The urban analysis provides the framework for a deeper and street related urban approach involving inhabitants and their lifestyle, in which experience, time, paths, observations, encounters and ideas become eventually as important as the built environment.” The Blinking City webpage, which has details on tons more Blinking City related stuff and other Instant Hutong projects, is really worth a click. (via)

Melted Wooden Picture Frames from Bonsoir Paris

 

These are amazing. Duramen is a series of wooden sculptures depicting melted picture frames from French design collective Bonsoir Paris. The level of craftsmanship with these handmade works (sculpted by Adrien Coroller) is tops. The dynamic in play between the fine wood used and the decaying, deathly manner in which it is presented nicely illustrates how even the most supple, healthy aspects of life can easily fall from grace. The picture frame reference is a nice touch, forcing us to call into question our very perception and take into account its tendency to directly affect the practical world. Bonsoir Paris, founded by Morgan Maccari and Remy Clemente, has only been around since 2010, but if they continue to push forward in a direction that allows for the production of more work of this quality, they should do fine. (via)

Dreamy Multiple Exposure Photographs by the Seven Fields of Aphelion

 

In addition to playing keys and synths in the popular Psych music outfit Black Moth Super Rainbow, Maureen Boyle (aka the Seven Fields of Aphelion) makes multiple exposure photographs that happen to correspond perfectly to the sounds of BMSR and her Seven Fields solo project. Dreamy, faded, and slightly off-kilter, the pictures are full of fantasy and Nature. You can buy jet prints of these at her Etsy page. There’s always been a bit of mystery surrounding Black Moth (what with the pseudonyms and everything), and this project fall somewhere along the same lines. But that’s okay. With photos as gorgeous as these (the prints are affordable too), there’s not really much that needs to be said.