Beautiful Bird’s Eye Visuals of Volcanoes in Iceland

Check out some amazing aerial shots of Iceland’s volcanic countryside from Russian photographer Andre Ermolaev. The intense heat from the volcanoes produces some really unique visuals. And Ermolaev’s bird’s eye view forces us to recall how majestic our planet really is. Not to get all preachy, but if we want to preserve visuals like these, we may have to alter our actions a little. (via)

Aartjan Venema’s Whacky Illustrations

Aartjan Venema is a Dutch illustrator with some really crazy ideas. Venema uses a lot of digital elements in his work but maintains a really nice aesthetic that evokes some of the brushwork characters and text elements of Raymond Pettibon’s drawings. He also packs a whole lot of narrative into one image. Nazi dinosaurs? Stonehenge murder mysteries? I’ll take it. (via)

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Alejandro Cartagena Captures Construction Workers In the Back of Trucks on Their Way to Work

In the Mexican city of Monterrey, where the over development of newly built suburbs  affect peoples daily lives and customs, there is a large bridge spanning Highway 85. On that bridge Alejandro Cartagena pointed his camera down at the morning traffic. He was seeking and peeking into the backs of open trucks, where construction workers often pile together on their way to earn a living. Like commuters everywhere, they sleep, eat, read and talk on their way to work. Often they look up, and maybe they notice someone taking their picture.

The shape of the tall, narrow pictures mimics a long stretch of highway, and conjures up the journey’s forward motion. Lined up in rows, each pictures a different vehicle, a different load of human cargo, and truck after truck; they suggest the relentless drive to stay alive.

Alejandro Cartagena is represented by Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles.

Giant Slugs Made of Plastic Shopping Bags in France

The work is made out of 40.000 plastic bags that move in the wind. The slugs are ascending this steep city staircase that leads up to a huge Catholic church, essentially signifying their slow crawl towards death. The work reminds us of religion, mortality, natural decay and the slow suffocation of commercialized societies.

Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman recently completed “Giant Slugs”, the installation pictured above, in Angers, France. (via)

Video Watch: Finding Your Voice

We’re happy to present the second installment of Hennessy’s mini documentary featuring Elliott Wilson, Founder of Rap Radar and Editor-in-Chief of Respect.  Follow Elliott through Brooklyn as he discusses how he became a prominent voice in hip-hop music and how he discovered his creative voice. Wilson advises that the only way for a young writer to find his voice is to keep writing; eventually you’re going to reach real opinions on a topic that’s important to you. Take a trip down the rabbit hole.  Watch more Hennessy videos and learn more about this movement at neverstopneversettle.com.

Nathaniel Russell’s Pseudo 70′s Weird Brushwork

Indianapolis artist Nathaniel Russell comin’ through with the brush clutch. I don’t know what stands out more with these – the super subtle humor or the pseudo 70′s illustrative steez, but they’ve got me feeling warm inside. Click past the jump to see more of what I’m talking about. And if you’re out all the way east right now, looks like he’s got a show coming up in Tokyo next month.

Pierluigi Fracassi’s sculptures of Bones, Mirrors And Thread

Pierluigi Fracassi is a multidisciplinary Italian artist. He works in everything from photography to sculpture. In his installation work, Fracassi uses mirrors, bones, and thread to great effect. He also uses a lot of text in his works, like the mirrored piece, “Verresti al ballo con me?” (will you go to prom with me?). Cold and humane at the same time, definitely some interesting stuff going on. Click through to see more from the artist.

Moment Factory’s Crazy Video Projection Piece On the Huge Facade of a Catalan Cathedral

Recently, Canadian installation/performance studio Moment Factory put on a really ambitious show in Barcelona. The group designed and executed a video projection piece using the facade of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia cathedral. Looks incredible. MF pulled off the piece three nights in a row during the recent La Merce Festival. It would kill my brain if I tried to engineer a video projection piece using a structure as complex as the Sagrada Familia. More images after the jump. (via)