Noah Scalin’s Skulls Made Out Of Mundane Objects

Noah Scalin lives and works in Richmond Virginia. His work consists of various skulls created from mundane objects such as wine corks, bed sheets, and tea bags to name a few. His daily creations culminated in the Skull-A-Day art project and blog in which Noah created and photographed one skull a day for a year. His latest skull creation is entitled “Dead Media”. Made from 497 VHS videocassettes, the installation comments on materials that were once considered cutting edge. Scalin’s clever variations on the skull remind us of fragility while inspiring us to see mundane objects as opportunities to playfully manipulate.

The Impressive Impressions Of Scout Paré-Phillips (NSFW)

Scout Paré-Phillips is an artist and musician based out of Chelsea, New York, and Baltimore, Maryland. In this fabulous and rather erotic series of photographs, the artist removes the model’s clothing leaving us with fleshy tones and only impressions. The imagination is allowed to run wild with the before and the after.  (via)

Advertise here !!!

The Library Dioramas of Marc Giai-Miniet

Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture3 Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture9Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture4

These aren’t photos of bisected buildings. Rather, they’re the carefully constructed dioramas of artist Marc Giai-Miniet.  His little libraries inhabit multi-storied buildings, perfectly suitable for us bookish nerds.  However, many of his pieces almost seem to be hiding something sinister.  The floors become darker, dirtier, more utilitarian the deeper they are in the building.  Soot stained boiler rooms occupy the basement floors along with objects long forgotten.  Perhaps the entire structure is a metaphor for the mind in a way: the diligent ego among the book lined floors and the unconscious hidden down in the dingy cellar.

Toni Spyra’s Disguised Weapons

Toni Spyra lives and works in Vienna, Austria. He creates alarming sculptures made out of mundane objects. From a canister of pepper spray with a perfume applicator attached, to a clothes hanger with a saw blade; these threatening works immediately announce their inherent danger and allow the viewer to reflect on safety and self protection in our culture.

Milan Hrnjazović’s Swirling Orgies Of Paint And Lust

Milan Hrnjazović

Milan Hrnjazović

Milan Hrnjazović

The works of emerging Serbian artist Milan Hrnjazović are a swirling and melting mix of body parts and abstraction. Hrnjazović’s figures morph and meld into one another in a psychedelic surreal orgy that at first looks photoshopped but in fact is painstakingly painted in oil revealing the sensual nature of love and lust through the ancient (and equally sensual) medium of painting.

3D Drawings Come To Life In Eric van Straaten’s Hyperrealistic Sculptures

Eric van Straaten - 3D printed sculpturesEric van Straaten - 3D printed sculptures

Eric van Straaten - 3D printed sculptures

Holland based Eric van Straaten is one of the most technical and talented 3-D sculptors in the world. According to trendwatchers, 3D-printing is the next big thing: in the near future, every household will own a printer that is capable of printing digital three-dimensional objects into a physical object. In the process that is best known under the name ‘Additive Manufacturing’, a 3D-printer builds up a model layer by layer by selectively hardening liquid or powder.

If this powder is a plaster-like material, a model can be directly printed in full color. The 3D-printing of delicate and colored models is far from being just pushing a button, but requires great technical skills. Therefore only a few specialize in this technique and there is no artist who pushes the boundaries of colorized 3D-prints as far as Eric van Straaten.

There is no technique that is capable of achieving such a great degree of hyper(sur)realism as 3D-modeling. At the same time, 3D printing is the only technique with which virtual models can be made actually physically touchable. Physical expressiveness in form and content is the biggest strength of the work of Eric van Straaten: while the sculptures remain to have a certain digital feel to them, the pieces contain a weirdly eroticized corporeality. Balancing on the edge of kitsch, the marzipan-like quality of the material resonates beautifully with the apparent innocence of the scenery. -Prof. Dr. Arnold Ratsberger

Ben Barretto at The Popular Workshop

San Francisco Gallery The Popular Workshop recently opened a solo exhibition by Australian artist Ben Barretto entitled Self Help. From the press release: “Self Help continues Barretto’s ongoing exploration into recursion; with each of the series of works he presents ‘making’ themselves to some extent. That is, the chosen material and its inherent properties inform the process and drive the work into a constant loop of feedback.
Self Help presents iterations of this process over 3 different mediums, including hand woven tapestries made from used climbing rope, reconfigured nylon training pants and a set of oil paintings. Within each of these series, Barretto creates a system through which the material qualities of each medium are unbound and rebound into a continuous ongoing cycle, a cycle which sits in collaboration with the expressive additions of Barretto’s own hand, having these works sit somewhere between assemblage and action painting.” The show is on view through April 12, 2013.

Christopher Saunders’ Ominous Landscape Paintings

Christopher Saunders lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His paintings are gloomy, atmospheric, and mesmerizing. In his own words: “My recent landscape paintings are primarily built around the cloud symbol as a depiction of event, at once internal, experiential and representational. The parameters for these events are of place rather than site and suggest the apocalyptic and contemplative sublime. The clouds depicted do not reference a specific photograph but are aggregated forms generated from a multi-source photographic index. Each cloud composition is derived from a collage method which conflates images of sky, pollution, smoke, explosions, plumes, swarms, and overexposed film. Additionally, the convention of field (plane) is employed to frame and stage these lurching deformations. Compositionally, field assumes the dual role of ground (rural and urban) and atmosphere (color and light). The image value of cloud (as event) lies within its openness, its internal dynamism, and the scope of the imaginary variations to which it lends itself. Thus field and cloud collide, collude, overlap and unfold along the horizon line of precipice. These are dramas of transition, a landscape on the move where there is no contradiction between the limitless of becoming and the singularity of the event.” (Via)