Giant Winding Installation Made From Buckets

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These installations of Jason Peters began with garbage.  While driving he spotted many of these buckets – the five gallon type often found in hardware stores.  Soon Peters had collected hundreds of them.  His installations utilize these buckets to form huge winding installations. The stacked buckets snake through large gallery spaces lit from within.  In his statement, he says of his work:

“By using large multiples of discarded items in repeating designs that establish unexpected patterns, societal cast offs are made beautiful through the alliteration of form. Once removed from their traditional context, the objects’ interaction with the environment becomes unpredictable and unstable”

Surrealistic Colored Pencil Drawings Inspired By Herbalists And Healers

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Marco Mazzoni - Colored Pencil

Marco Mazzoni’s work softly drips with an exquisite ease of darkness. From blooming faces where birds gather to a rabbit draining with butterfly wings, each image surrealistically depicts folklore infused with spiritual healing properties that twist and twirl with our own imaginative connections to nature.

To elaborate, Jonathan Levine Gallery notes, “Mazzoni’s imagery references herbalist traditions and Sardinian folklore of mystical seductresses who enchant, curse and cure. His body of work is a tribute to the legacy of female healers throughout history. These women held an important role in medieval communities yet their ancient knowledge of the natural healing properties of medicinal plants was widely feared by the Church, viewed as witchcraft and cause for persecution.” 

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Safely Playing On Building Facade – Visual Illusion Installation By Leandro Erlich

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The installations of Argentine artist Leandro Erlich are known to be visually playful.  His most recent installation definitely follows suit.  For Dalston House, Erlich constructed a facade of a three story home which lies horizontally on the ground.  A giant and cleverly angled mirror gives the facade, and those on it, the appearance of being vertical.  Visitors hang from roofs, sit casually perched on ledges, and effortlessly walk down the wall.  Also check out Erlich previously here.

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Bear Kirkpatrick Explores The Sacred And Wild In Photography Series Hierophanies

In his series Hierophanies, Portsmouth, New Hampshire-based artist Bear Kirkpatrick photographs people naked in wild locations. Kirkpatrick travels hours to bring his subjects to remote wilderness and shoots as many images as possible in 15 minutes “quickly to prevent self-reflection or conscious posing” ultimately in an effort to bring out their “liminal states.”

Kirkpatrick adds of the series title: “Hierophanies was taken from the writings of Mircea Eliade; a hierophany was a word he coined to describe in primitive religious mythology a tear in the fabric of the profane world—the world of nature, life and death, rebirth, growth, time—through which it is possible to witness the sacred world—the timeless and eternal.”

Abstract “Paintings” Created By Computer Algorithms

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Perhaps in the strictest sense, these abstract pieces by artist Siebren Versteeg aren’t paintings (or maybe in any sense they are not really paintings).  However, they do say quite a bit about painting and creativity.  Versteeg created code that utilizes a complex set of algorithms to create these pieces.  The work is then often printed on to paper or canvas.  Versteeg observes patterns, tendencies, styles in abstract expressionist painting and uses these as the basis for the code that create these “paintings”.  His programmed algorithms work with variable qualities such as viscosity, color, drips, and so on.  The program then “decides” how to use and combine these variable in several layers to create a complete composition.  In a way, the art is in the code Versteeg creates – the paintings merely a visual manifestation of that code.

Paintings That Depict The Obstruction Of Weather And Abstraction Of Shape

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Natalie Arnoldi grew up in Malibu. Deeply enriched by such coastal experiences, her oil paintings, however, are not so much picturesque, as they are quietly treading with fuzzy emotional frequency. Ranging from the momentary bliss of a fading firework over water to the lonesome bending highway long after dusk, each piece captures a certain hypnotic and unsettling obstruction of weather and abstraction of shape: a familiar interlude before the abyss.

Of her work, Arnoldi states, “Both processes, science and art, are a form of exploration, at once (both) highly emotional and analytical, but always inquisitive. The methods might be different, but the goal is the same—seeking truth in the most authentic way I know how.”

The Functioning Hydraulic Powered Sculptures James Capper

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These sculptures by artist James Capper are working hydraulic implements.  Their primary colors, spare design, and steel build make the pieces out to be purely utilitarian construction tools.  However, these aren’t actual power tools and they don’t necessary build anything.  Instead they sit menacingly with feeling like of the premonition of violence.  You can almost hear the hiss and huff of air powering the blades.  Perhaps the tools are a hint at the violence implicit in production and progress.

Susanna Bauer Threads And Weaves Over Small Natural Objects

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“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.” – Susanna Bauer