Manuel Marti Moreno’s Transient Iron Nut Sculptures

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Via Colossal: “Sculptor Manuel Martí Moreno lives and works in Valencia, Spain and forms these wonderful figurative pieces out of iron nuts. Via email Moreno says that he is most interested in showing the passage of time, the transience of life, and our collective awareness of our own mortality, seemingly evidenced by the spectre of decay at the edges of his works. You can see more images including installation shots on his blog, and also here. If you liked this, also check out the sculptures of Park Chan-Girl.”

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Hanksy: The Puntastic Street Fartist

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Just when you thought Banksy was the real trickster of the art world, along comes . . . Hanksy, the puntastic street fartist. His use of satire not only challenges the smug, but playfully subverts the current street art standard with a necessary dose of light antagonism.

Check out the video after the jump to see a short documentary about Hanksy’s mysterious persona: his meager “greeting card” beginnings and current mission statement, which centers on a dream of meeting Tom Hanks.

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Kirsten Hassenfeld’s Fragile, Ethereal Paper Gems

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Massive, glowing webs of geometric gems climb the walls, successfully controlling the behavior of early afternoon light—while soaking the empty surfaces of the space with gentle washes of color. It’s only upon close inspection that the pieces reveal themselves to be painstakingly handcrafted, light-as-a-feather paper sculptures by Brooklyn-based artist Kirsten Hassenfeld. She applies her sharp paper craft skill set to creating fanciful, (if not slightly frivolous) site-specific works that command presence, but in reality are quite ephemeral. A nice study of pure form, movement and spatial composition.

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Walk ‘In Orbit’ 65 Feet Off the Ground In Tomás Saraceno’s New Installation

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Artist Tomás Saraceno just opened his newest installation on June 21 at K21 Staendehaus (see his work previously here).  He is known for creating sprawling interactive installations.  However, In Orbit is his largest and most complex piece to date.  Saraceno’s newest work is situated 65 feet over a piazza.  It consists of multi-tiered netting which visitors can wander through.  The installation is scattered with clear and metallic orbs, some nearly 30 feet in diameter, resembling planets floating in space.  [via]

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Pixelated Portraits Hand Painted In Watercolor

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Nathan Manire‘s work may seem more akin to printing than painting.  These water color on paper pieces pleasantly blend digital and handmade imagery.  The bleeding and absorption of paint into the grain of the paper reveals the passing of an artist’s hand.  However, the paintings refer to the pixelized image.  In a strange way, stepping back from each painting seems to reveal more detail, while stepping forward again turns the piece into a nearly abstract work.  His skillful painting has won him high profile clients such as Nike, Wired magazine, and Cosmopolitan magazine.

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Black And White Illustrations Of Imaginary Environments Transformed Into Sculptures

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Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK seems to stick to illustrating, even when crafting work in three dimensions.  Like his illustrative work, the sculptures are in spare black and white and made using paper. His Object series consists of a number of electronic appliances, such as a computer, microwave oven, and a television set.  Inside each appliance is a carefully crafted home setting.  Explaining the thought behind the series Kevin says:

 

“I seeked to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.”
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Suellen Parker Digitally Remasters Clay Sculptures With Fragments Of Photography

 

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Suellen Parker builds each character from unforgettable moments of strangers or friends. First, she starts with sculpting the shape from plastiline clay before photographing it with a blank backdrop. Then, simultaneously, she scavengers for props, walls, or environments that might suit a certain character well and shoots those too. All of these images are finally loaded into a computer, where the art of merging and manipulation occurs. Skin tones are “digitally painted” and human faces technologically blend with clay while backgrounds stitch together to create a new imaginative world.

Of Letting Go, her most recent series collected here, Parker strives to twist not only mediums, but also gender roles. She suggests her characters concretely and conceptually have a fine blend of both, and states, they “are attempting to find a sacred space, a place of vulnerability, a place where they allow themselves to be really seen. By quieting one’s life, even momentarily, an opportunity is presented to learn truths about oneself. By engaging in private play, one is able to let go of expectations and rules. The result is a private and truthful moment that may be enjoyed without fear of judgment or consequence.”

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Endearing Photographs Of People Explaining And Gazing At Art

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The photographs of Matthew Monteith‘s series Guardare turn the subject back on to the viewer.  His images depict people explaining, gazing at, and otherwise admiring art.  When I first heard about the series I was prepared to be annoyed with the pedantic gestures and expressions of people acting smarter than thou.  However, the photographs are surprisingly endearing.  People are visibly moved, sincerely engaged with the work often just out of frame.  Guardare perhaps suggests that the art in a gallery doesn’t happen with the work but between two viewers discussing it.

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