Kazuki Guzmán Creates Intricate Work Out of Mundane Materials (Like Embroidered Meat!)

GuzmanSculpture10 GuzmanSculpture GuzmanSculpture6

Kazuki Guzmán‘s unique heritage (he has a Chilean father and a Japanese mother) informs the playful and fluid approach to his work. Guzmán’s creations range from toothpaste (!), nutshell, pencil, and gum sculptures to embroidered bananas and meat. For Guzmán, the essence of play is fundamental to the outcome of his work. “I equally enjoy allowing my materials to define the context of my artwork, and conversely, the challenge of letting the context of my work dictate the material execution. Most of my inspirations arise from mundane events… Most importantly, I strive for intricacy and exquisite craftsmanship in my work, while focusing on not losing my very whimsical sense of humor and play.” Guzmán lives in Chicago.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Stereoscopic GIFS Create 3D Illusion

David Alexander Slaager gif (2)

David Alexander Slaager gif (4)

David Alexander Slaager gif (5)

CLICK ON IMAGES TO VIEW GIF ANIMATION

These GIFS from David Alexander Slaager, otherwise known as General Dikki, will mess with your eyes (and possibly give you a headache if you don’t quit staring at them).  The GIFs use a technique called stereoscopy.  Stereoscopic images create the illusion of depth by presenting two images that are very slightly different from each other.  Each image is presented to each eye and the brain combines the two images to create a single image that seems three dimensional.  Slaagers GIFs quickly alternate between these two images nearly creating the same three dimensional effect.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Alicia Eggert’s Temporal Conceptual Installations

EggertInstallation7

EggertInstallation3

EggertInstallation8

Alicia Eggert creates kinetic, electronic, and interactive sculpture and installation work. With a background in interior and architectural design, Eggert builds her work with a temporal conception reflected in the stillness and movement of her pieces. Implementing a variety of objects in her designs, such as clocks, flashing LED text, a perpetually spinning bicycle wheel, and re-usable ceramic coffee cups that shatter down a perceived assembly line, Eggert uses simple ideas to convey a world of depth. Some of her work is created in collaboration with other artists, as she values sharing the creative experience with another person. She currently lives in Portland, Maine, and teaches sculpture and architecture at Bowdoin College.

Currently Trending

Whimsical Colorful Artwork Created Out Of Gifs, Intagram videos, Foil, Chewing Gum And More!

MainarInstallation MainarDesign11 MainarGif12

Ibon Mainar uses visual multimedia to create whimsical and colorful work. Whether he is creating gifs, torn cardboard designs, Instagram videos, video projections onto foil and tinsel, or sculpting gum and popcorn, Mainar’s aesthetic is contemporary and playful. His interjections into Edward Hopper’s paintings create a curious juxtaposition of modern and contemporary aesthetics. With simplicity and humor, Mainar develops a visual language across various media that feels novel and universal. Mainar lives in San Sebastian, Spain.

Currently Trending

Baroque Frames And Adornments Carved From Cardboard

Jillian Salik installation6 Jillian Salik installation3

Jillian Salik installation2

The artwork of Jillian Salik offers up understated surprises.  Her new exhibit DUEL TINT features frames, window dressing, and other wall fixtures adorned with baroque ornamentation.  However, the typically gilded and gaudy colors that typically accompany such adornments, the reflections and windows that should fit in such frames were no where to be seen.  Salik only offers the bare structure of the frames and ornamentation.  Also, Salik makes an interesting choice of material: cardboard.  She contrasts high-society trimmings and embellishments with a decidedly “low” material and digital production processes.

Currently Trending

Manmade Hermit Crab Shells Mimic Human Buildings

Aki Inomata sculpture2 Aki Inomata sculpture1

Aki Inomata sculpture3

Artist Aki Inomata asks “Why not hand over a “shelter” to hermit crabs?”  and this is exactly what she does.  Inomata carefully scanned the structure of shells used by hermit crabs and took note of their specific needs.  Then using 3D modeling software she created new “homes” for these crabs.  Drawing a connection between humans and the hermit crabs, Inomata decorated the shells with human structures and dwellings.  Somewhat similar to humans, the crabs out grow their shells and must look for new shelter.  The project underscores the basic need of a place to live, regardless of the seeming complexity behind the issue.

Currently Trending

Oil Paintings Examine The Freedom To Connect, Rebel, And Destruct

Alexander Tinei - PaintingAlexander Tinei - Painting Alexander Tinei - Painting

Living and working in Budapest, Alexander Tinei originally hails from Caushani, Moldova, and his work seems to reflect the historical and current climate of these two places– a certain transition into post communism mainstream. That said, however, I would avoid labeling his work as something political. It feels more personal or social, examining identity as it relates or responds to its fluid environment. The darkness in each image is a certain type of natural blooming that slowly corrodes. Emphasis is not on reckless destruction alone, but the cultivation and freedom to pursue it.

Currently Trending

Glitch Inspired Street Art

Krzysztof Syruc Street art6 Krzysztof Syruc Street art7

Krzysztof Syruc Street art3

The art of the glitch has made its way off the screen out of the realm of the accidental.  Perhaps it’s the aesthetic source of a new abstraction.  The form has also made its way street art and graffiti.  Polish artist Krzysztof Syruć incorporates explicit glitch stylings and subtler inspiration in much of his work.  This first piece seems to use its background as a source image.  The image is distorted, ‘corrupted’, and reduced to basic values.  Other pieces seem to reference circuitry, code, and even biological systems.

Currently Trending