Website Builder Made With Color Presents: Jonah Fernandez Olson’s Topographic Maps Of Southern California

jonah Fernandez website builder made with color

website builder made with color

website builder made with color

It’s Tuesday and time once again for our exclusive artist feature in partnership with premiere website builder Made With Color. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek websites. Website builder Made With Color doesn’t just help artists create gorgeous websites but allows them to do so in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are happy to share the multi-media work of Jonah Fernandez Olson.

Los Angeles based artist Jonah Fernandez Olson uses printmaking, rubbing, drawing, collage, and other markmaking techniques to investigate the process of landscape formation and the relationships between changing and static, internal and external personal environments. Recently he has been creating work focusing on the San Gabriel Mountains, the fastest growing and fastest eroding mountain range in the world.

“In my case, “drawing” is the formation of any object, and the object acts as landscape.  I believe land formation, at its core, is no different from drawing, and the artist forms landscapes in a way that is no different in essence from how the earth’s surface is self generating, or how anything is created.

The creation, collection, and re-appropriation of elements colliding to form a topographical object is the drawing.  The studio is the “core” containing his ephemeral detritus. Here, material has been melted down, eroded, and regurgitated into layers.  Color is used as it surfaces in availability and necessity.  Formations become descriptive or obscure.  Landscapes endure, or they die at a faster rate and re-enter the core.  The crust is fluid. “

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Lauren Semivan’s Black And White Photography Digs At Our Primitive Nature

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Lauren Semivan’s black and white photography raises the dead, feels rich with ritual, and sullen from the earth. To say it is simply an abstract psychological expression would be too easy. There’s something else happening here that is magically archaic, and it’s not just the finely tailored compositions that carefully, yet seemingly casually, dig at our remains by arranging drawn fragments, bodies, vegetation, bones, and string, against a sparse backdrop. This “something else” is movement or play not just in the environment, but as or with the environment, a dreamy surreal fade that lingers.

Technically, each image is a true representation of not just what collects, but how the collection becomes. Shot with a purist sense of photography’s past, Semivan uses an early 20th century 8 x 10″ view camera and, without digital manipulation or any touch-ups at all, develops prints from a scanned large format negative. The ephemeral result, interestingly, pushes on our own anthropological or archeological impulses as a species– asking us to engage and connect with our ancestors, creatively, scientifically, and divinely.

Of her work, Semivan states, “In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course. Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space. Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. Observatory elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds. Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings.”

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Rebecca Stevenson’s Surrealist Macabre Sculptures

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Rebecca Stevenson’s figurative sculptures are both eerie and beautiful. Using primarily polyresin and wax, her concept usually begins with a human or animal figure cast in a subdued monochromatic color that then appears to blossom or decay with varieties of multi-colored organic compounds. These blossoms almost consume the figures, resulting in provocative, surreal sculptures. Her work embodies the process of creation and destruction, revealing the beauty that emerges from this organic cycle. Some of it reminds me of walking around farm pastures when I was younger, and discovering various animal skulls that the grass had begun to climb through. If her work is disturbing, it is only because it doesn’t try to mask the macabre beauty of the growth/decay process. “My work is concerned with the visceral and the sensual. It draws upon anatomical drawing and botanical illustration, but occupies a liminal territory between scientific enquiry and the subjective, imaginary body.” (via)

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Artist Collaborates With Bees to Cover Sculptures With Honeycomb

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You could say artist Aganetha Dyck creates her sculptures as much as she fascilitates them.  Dyck uses honeybees to decorate these figurines.  The bees create graceful lines and countours that seem compliment the existing shapes of the figures.  Their honeycomb patterns don’t seem like strange additions but rather enhancements.  Dyck begins her process with figurines, often broken or damaged in some way.  Then collaborating with beekeepers and scientists, bees are allowed to add their distinctive pattern to each small statue.  Dyck describes her process:

“To begin a collaborative project with the honeybees, I choose a slightly broken object or damaged material from a second hand market place. I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail. To encourage the honeybees to communicate, I strategically add wax or honey, propolis or hand-made honeycomb patterns to the objects prior to placing them into their hives. At least I like to think my methods are strategic. The honeybees often think otherwise and respond to what is placed within their hive in ways that make my mind reel.”

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Graphic Designers Embark on Strange 40 Day Dating Project

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40 Days of Dating – All Videos from 40 Days of Dating on Vimeo.

It’s difficult to tell if it is performance art, a design project, or just a weird way to date.  However you classify it, graphic designers Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman have flung themselves into the project straightforwardly titled 40 Days of Dating.  Exasperated with the New York City dating scene, the designers turned to each other.  Each deals with the opposite problem – Jessica jumps in too quickly, Timothy’s reluctant to take the plunge.  The two good friends decided to date each other for forty days – the amount of time often thought required to quit a bad habit.  However, the dating project entails a bit more.  First, there are six rules:

  1. We will see each other every day for forty days.
  2. We will go on at least three dates a week.
  3. We will see a couples therapist once a week.
  4. We will go on one weekend trip together.
  5. We will fill out the daily questionnaire and document everything.
  6. We will not see, date, hookup, or have sex with anyone else.

The daily dating adventures of the couple were then uploaded to their in fashionable design style.  Would love and dating be redeemed or their relationship irreparably ruined?  40 Days of Dating was set to find out.

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Professor Teaches Human Anatomy By Painting Students Bodies

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At RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, lecturer Claudia Diaz has implemented an unconventional project in order to inspire her anatomy students. After teaching  human anatomy for over 20 years, Diaz decided to try something new as she found the regular routine of anatomical memorization boring and uninspired. Over the past 3 years, Diaz has explored human anatomy with her students by having them paint the bodies of 10 students, revealing tendons and bones that would be visible if the person’s skin were stripped. Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said. (via)

This project seems to follow a trend in the merging of science and art, specifically within the study of human anatomy, and the direct involvement of real human bodies in order to reveal the beauty of the human body, inside and out.

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Private Photo Booth Moments

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Charlotte Niel’s series Behind the Curtain captures the moments before, during, and after patrons’ engagements with carnival and fair photo booths. These photographs are light and fun, bright and summery. Photo booths have consistently been a place of discovery and wonder, a place to experience the excitement of pulling a curtain behind you to allow some privacy in the midst of a very public setting. In a culture where so much of our photography experience is digital, and the tangibility of the photograph does not seem to be as privileged or common as it once it was, the photo booth is a place that offers this immediate experience. I particularly enjoy the variety of color in these photographs and Niel’s captures of the bottom halves of the photo booth’s subjects. There’s a sense of mystery and curiosity that these images evoke, and I think that largely has something to do with the merging of these private moments in a public setting captured with a public eye.

Of her series, Niel explains, “How many times have we looked at an old photograph and wondered about the person in the frame? People or family members we never knew, set in places we never visited or that have changed beyond recognition. Photos are often the only means to link us to our past or the past of others. They help us not to forget. They become visual memories. For these reasons, I find it fascinating to watch what happens at photo booths at county fairs. People come with family and friends to celebrate anniversaries, birthdays, friendships or just to make an annual visit to the booths. For others, it is just a way to capture who they are or with whom they are at that moment, on their own private stage. The result is a body of work of people who shared with me moments that took place in front of and behind the curtain, documented for unknown viewers. With my camera, it became a transformation of a private moment into a public one.”

Charlotte Niel lives and works in San Francisco.

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Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present

Image by: Scott Rudd
Image by: Scott Rudd

Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present

Trailer – Marina Abramovic The Artist is Present from Show of Force on Vimeo.

Marina Abramović is one of the most compelling artists of our time. Seductive, fearless and outrageous, she has been redefining what art is for nearly forty years. Using her own body as a vehicle, pushing herself beyond her physical and mental limits, and at times risking her life in the process, Marina creates performances that challenge, shock and move us. Through her and with her, boundaries are crossed, consciousness expanded — and art as we know it is reborn.

The feature-length documentary film Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present follows the artist as she prepares for what may be the most challenging performance of her life — a new piece that will be the highlight of a major retrospective of her work, taking place this spring at The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

To be given a retrospective at one of the world’s premiere museums is, for any living artist, the most exhilarating sort of milestone. For Marina, it is far more — it is the chance to finally silence the question she has been hearing over and over again for four decades: “But why is this art?” At 63, she has lost patience with being branded “alternative.” That designation, she says, just gives people license to rip her off. What she wants now is for performance art to be legitimated. She is thinking of her legacy — and the MOMA show, as she well knows, can secure it once and for all. “It is,” she says simply, “the most important [show] of my life.””

View some of our favorite videos and interviews with Marina Abramovic after the jump.

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