Natalie Ryan’s Mysterious Blue Velvet Taxidermy

Natalie Ryan - Blue Velvet Taxidermy Natalie Ryan - Blue Velvet Taxidermy Natalie Ryan - Blue Velvet Taxidermy

Animal sculptures by Australian artist Natalie Ryan are inspired by taxidermy. While conventional taxidermy practices dictate that she preserve the skin/fur of the animal she is preparing, Ryan instead uses synthetic materials to cover casts of squirrels, bears, and monkeys. Her current portfolio cloaks these animals entirely in blue velvet.

While Ryan’s web presence is limited, her gallery representation, Dianne Tanzer Gallery in Melbourne writes about Ryan’s latest exhibition, Evanescere, stating:

Continuing to explore notions of the cadaver as a secondary form, a shadow of it’s living self, these works depict the internals of animals stripped of their dermis and identifying features. Evanescere looks at the body in a suspended state of disappearing. In conjunction with this, these works also explore the idea of the animal cadaver on display and museology as a resting place. These works combine bodies and elements of the landscape that reference the paradigm of Natural History Museum displays. They seek to question the role the body plays in the Museum and the loss of the individual as it becomes a subject to represent an entire species.

Ryan’s decision to color her work bright blue introduces a contemporary aesthetic to taxidermy. It references the trends of home decor over the past few years, in which loud, unnatural colors are applied to natural objects. When thinking about traditional taxidermy and how it uses real feathers and fur, the artist makes a statement about craft and preservation. The prevailing attitude of culture champions innovation and exploration of the new. Ryan is stripping this practice of its ritual, simply using foam casts and not real animals. She’s chosen a color and material that’s more en vogue. We are drawn to this work because it’s a twist on an old practice. She makes taxidermy fresh rather than just feeling old.

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David Szauder’s Finds Parallels Between Computer Glitches And Failed Human Memories

Digital Art

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glitch art

David Szauder, a German digital artist, takes interest in the glitch phenomenon. Failed Memory, the name of the compilation of images, showcases photographs that are purposely altered. Precisely, the photograph’s flow is interrupted by the sudden ambiguity of lines and distortions occurring in certain parts of the subject’s body.

His ‘glitch’ technique literally translates to the themes he is working with here: memory and the possible failure to reconstruct them. Much like the files on our computer’s memory, human recollection of events might get distorted throughout time.

“Our brains store away images to retrieve them later, like files stored away on a hard drive. But when we go back and try to re-access those memories, we may find them to be corrupted in some way.”

His work is more than just visual; Szauder provides text to go along with the images. On his Behance profile, the artist expresses that the images recollect failed memories related to family moments. (via IGNANT)

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Made With Color Presents: Heeseop Yoon’sTape And Mylar Wall Drawings

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"Crossing the Line" at Mixed Greens

"Still Life #11" by Heeseop Yoon at Smack Mellon

We’ve teamed up with Website builder Made With Color to bring our faithful readers yet another exclusive artist feature. Each week we join forces to share some of our favorite creatives working today who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek website. All Made With Color sites are responsive and come with a built in mobile site, which means that your portfolio looks perfect no matter how it’s viewed- from desktops to smart phones. This week we are happy to present to you the incredible wall drawings/murals of Heeseop Yoon.

Korean born, NYC based Heeseop Yoon is not scared of scale. Her impressive wall drawings cover gallery walls in a manic entanglement of line and form, swaying back and forth between abstraction and representation. From afar the drawings resemble a mass of scribbles weaving through one another but as you get closer you realize that the dense drawings are actually layer upon layer of furniture, clothing, objects, and other household items. What’s even more impressive is that Yoon’s drawings are not created with paint or ink but are in fact “drawn” with hundreds of feet of black tape that are cut into pieces. Other murals are created with cut Mylar layered on top of each other to create ghostly images that resemble X-rays.

Yoon states about her work:

My work deals with memory and perception within cluttered spaces. I begin by photographing interiors such as basements, workshops, and storage spaces, places where everything is jumbled and time becomes ambiguous without the presence of people. From these photographs I construct a view and then I draw freehand without erasing. As I correct “mistakes” the work results in double or multiple lines, which reflect how my perception has changed over time and makes me question my initial perception. Paradoxically, greater concentration and more lines make the drawn objects less clear. The more I see, the less I believe in the accuracy or reality of the images I draw.

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Banksy Pieces Transformed Into GIF Animations

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Serbian Tumblr gif artist ABVH has created animations based on some of Banksy’s iconic street art. These animations give life to Banksy’s poignant (but static) images by enlivening the experience of humor and absurdity that accompanies much of Banksy’s work. These gifs first began to appear in September of last year. Since then, ABVH has created a few more images, the latest of which was posted just last week. Be sure to follow the artist’s Tumblr page to check out more of these gifs as they appear.  Made By ABVH also features other animated gif work, included some rendered in 3D, requiring the use of proper glasses. (via we the urban)

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Nobuhiro Nakanishi’s Mesmerizing Layered Landscapes

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Nobuhiro Nakanishi - sculpture

Nobuhiro Nakanishi produces beautifully mesmerizing atypical landscapes.  The Osaka, Japan-based artist creates the works, which he called “Layered Drawings,” by photographing a scene over a period of time.  He then laser prints each image and mounts it to acrylic.  Subtle changes emerge in each frame, and once they are layered they portray an untraditional landscape.  As a viewer walks passed the work he or she experiences, to some degree, the passing of time within this particular place.

Interested in the way sculpture is defined by the thought, awareness and the method it employs, Nakanishi seeks to analyze the way we perceive the world.  Experiencing a photographic landscape is generally a two-dimensional process whereby a viewer stands in front of an image.  She can then empathize with the artist, seeing what he saw in the captured scene, but the experience is always a viewer looking at a flat surface.  With Nakanishi’s works, the results are wholly different.  The more physical, dimensional aspects of Nakanishi’s sculptural landscapes contain infinitely more detail.  The effect is a richer experience.  Our minds momentarily transport us to Nakanishi’s foggy forest in the morning, or to his hill overlooking a gorgeous sunset.  Nakanishi’s landscapes trigger our memories and senses in a way traditional landscapes cannot.

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Lexus Creates Car That Paints Your Portrait While You Drive

Lexus IS 300h - Digital Painting

Lexus IS 300h - Digital Painting

Luxury car brand, Lexus, has figured out a way to transform driving into art. Literally. In a new project titled Art Is Motion, the company combines art, software, and driving as a way to produce a painting as you commute to work. Lexus gave long-time art collector Walter Vanhaerent a new Lexus IS 300h hybrid vehicle that creates auto-generative portraits of the driver. As Vanhaerent drives, the car paints. Art Is Motion is part marketing and part art experiment.

The software used for Art Is Motion measures Vanhaerent’s speed, acceleration, and hybridity. It takes this data and converts it into brush strokes, which are modeled from the style of Spanish multi-media artist Sergio Abilac. The artist is really enthusiastic about this new technology. In a video interview, Abilac refers to the software as cloning his creative process. It’s not meant to be derogatory, and he seems genuinely excited at the prospect of this new technological assistant generating his work. It allows him to make things he would never had time to make otherwise.

The way the software renders a portrait is all based on how Vanhaerent drives. If he feels like speeding (using the gas engine), then the portrait is going have a lot of warm colors with abstract brush strokes. If Vanhaerent decides to relax and enjoy the scenery (using the hybrid engine), then that too will be reflected. His portrait will have smaller, detailed strokes with blues and cool greens.

The car features a large LCD display that dynamically paints Vanhaerent’s face as he drives. On the Art Is Motion website (www.artismotion.com), Lexus has recorded a few trips. In 2 minute long video segments, the portrait is recreated, showing us the speed the car was traveling, and more. By watching it, you really start to understand how much the style of driving affects the outcome of the portrait. (Via Gizmodo.)


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Ben Sandler Transforms The Painted Desert Into Futuristic Architecture

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painted desert

Photographer Ben Sandler (previously here) has applied his fascination with the desert landscapes outside of Phoenix, Arizona into an unearthly yet oddly remindful new photoseries titled Badlands. Conceived with and digitally constructed by Zeitguised, the photographic images of Sandler are transformed into something otherwordly. According to Sandler’s statement of the Badlands project, “The Painted Desert – as it is known – is a land full of the remnants of a previously lush and fertile environment, now dried up and succumbed to the harshness of the arid atmosphere and unforgiving sun. The sweeping colors, immense spread of land, mountains eroding into flowing waves of sand and pebble – indeed, it seems that it is a glimpse from another world.”

The photoseries, made in collaboration from Arizona, Berlin and Paris, combines simulated digital models which further explore the haunting landscapes, reinterpreting the “the geologic phenomenology of the fantastical land“. This collaborative process seems imperative to both the blended natural and unnatural aesthetic of project, as well as the message developed from it. “Within this process, an aesthetic language is developed – one that interpolates between the inorganic substrates of the prehistoric landscape, with the organic and tectonic structures embedded within. Based on image analysis and observation, the project circumvents the dichotomy of the real and the fake, as it combines the two in imagery that is taking cues from itself – iterating an image transformation based on its original recording.”

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Rim Lee’s Paintings Of Human Emotion

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Korean artist Rim Lee creates The Mess of Emotion, a haunting series of oil paintings that combine performance, photography and oils. The multi-faceted paintings work well within the themes the artist plays with, as they literally show the woman’s tortured yet delicate  essence driven by emotional distress quite beautifully.

Lee plays model for her photographs; these [photographs] are then referenced in her paintings. The act of transferring the realistic image onto a canvas [a surface which usually allows for unworldly expression] indicates an unyielding desire to break free from the idea that judging character solely based on interpretations of physical characteristics and movements is in part, wrong.

Aptly so, the paint acts as a conduit for emotion and expression; the paint washes over Lee’s hyper-realistic physical portrayal, creating a dialogue between the two polarities.

The heavy-expressionistic brushstrokes fill the canvas with texture; they rise above anything else, as to indicate relevance on behalf of the otherwise invisible mental anguish she is going through. [via My Modern Met]

 

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