Three Artists Who Transform Origami Into Incredible Fine Art

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Russian artist Pavel Platonov experimented with origami because of his inclination toward sharp, angular, geometric forms.  Better known as a photographer who works with a unique and surreal type of portraiture, Platonov’s sculptures have a reflective quality to them, allowing a viewer to learn something about himself while observing the work.  Bizarre and often placed in natural settings Platonov’s pieces allow a viewer to encounter and react to discovering something strange and out of place.

Interested in the idea of a final image juxtaposed with the process of achieving that final image, artist Marc Fichou experimented with the conceptual process of folding, and unfolding, origami forms.  Drawing attention to the way our mind makes the connection between the two contrasting images, which don’t directly or immediately resemble one another, Fichou creates works that are visually compelling, and intellectually engaging.

Born to teenage, Mexican-American gang members, artist Gerardo Hacer escaped to fantasy worlds via the art of origami.  Learning to make paper cranes at some point during his stay in a string of foster homes Hacer combined that outlet with an inspiration found in Calder’s Los Angeles sculpture, “The Four Arches.”  Hacer decided to become an artist and even changed his name, “Gomez-Martinez,” to “Hacer,” which means “to make” in Spanish.  Hacer became a sculpture who creates large-scale origami forms, engaging his original love for origami with his desire to create substantial and impressive works of art.

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer