Zachari Logan Depicts Hybridized Nature In The Exploration Of Masculinity And Queer Identities

Eunuch Tapestry 5 (detail) (2015).

Eunuch Tapestry 5 (detail) (2015).

Leshy 2 (2014).

Leshy 2 (2014).

Fountain 1 (2013).

Fountain 1 (2013).

Root 2 (in progress).

Root 2 (in progress) (2015).

Zachari Logan is a Saskatoon-based artist who creates stunningly detailed drawings, installations, and ceramic works that explore representations of masculinity and queer identities. Proliferating throughout his works are thick amalgams of nature; beards and hair sprout into lush habitats for various animals (see the “Wild-Man” series); ceramic petals cluster together like piles of delicate, bleached bones (“Fountain 1”); and elsewhere, a mythological body composed entirely of flora and fauna melds with the surrounding forest (“Leshy 2”). Interestingly, the plants depicted are of diverse origins, sourced from images collected by Logan in North America and Europe. These beautifully-woven hybrid landscapes represent the liminal spaces inhabited by queer identities — that is, those vital spaces between “here” and “there” that unsettle the restrictive binaries of heteronormative gender and sexuality.

Many of these works are interpretative self-portraits of Logan, created in the exploration of his own body, memories, and sense of place. However, in his more recent works, Logan has portrayed the body more as a “catalyst,” thereby allowing him to “re-wild his body as a queer embodiment of nature” (Source). One of his most spectacular and ongoing works, the Eunuch Tapestry Series, exemplifies this shift from self-portraiture to a more objective exploration of identity, both corporeal and incorporeal. Based on the fourteenth-century Flemish Unicorn Tapestries, the Eunuch Tapestries feature camouflaged bodies (self-representations of Logan) crouching and searching amidst walls of dense, dark foliage. The newest work, “Tapestry 5” (shown above), features a nude, shadowy figure moving quietly through the hybridized forest. Whereas the Unicorn Tapestries represent a search for a mythical creature, Logan’s works metaphorically explore the liminal terrain of queerness, discovering new bodily narratives infused with history, myth, and presence.

Always investigating and expanding the boundaries between the physical and metaphysical, Logan’s ceramic works draw these two realms together. “Fountain 1,” for example, is a time-based installation whose bone-like flowers accumulate every time it is shown, proliferating like a living thing despite its sterile, ceramic composition. The Root Series also represents a philosophical blending of physical body and metaphysical time, place, and memory; detached body parts surrealistically sprout flourishing weeds. In these works, the body is both the adornment and the catalyst, the tangible and intangible vessel through which we derive personal meaning and identity.

Logan is currently attending the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) in Brooklyn (ending this month). His “Eunuch Tapestry 5” is on display at the Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art until Tuesday, June 23rd. He is currently exhibiting at Paul Petro Contemporary Art in Toronto until July 11th, and is also featured this month at Western Project in Los Angeles. Keep an eye out for Logan’s upcoming projects in in Atlanta, Seattle, Regina (Canada), and Verona, and visit his website and Facebook page to see more beautiful and exploratory works.

Fountain 1 (2013).

Fountain 1 (2013).

Root 1

Root 1 (2015).

Dandelion Teapot (2014).

Dandelion Teapot (2014).

Eunuch Tapestry 3, Fugitive Garden installation.

Eunuch Tapestry 3, Fugitive Garden installation.

Eunuch Tapestry 5 - installation

Eunuch Tapestry 5 – installation.

Datura from Eunuch Tapestry Series (2013).

Datura from Eunuch Tapestry Series (2013).

Wild Man 4 (2015).

Wild Man 4 (2015).

Wild Man 3 (2013).

Wild Man 3 (2013).

Wild Man 3 (detail) (2013).

Wild Man 3 (detail) (2013).

Wild Man 5 (2015).

Wild Man 5 (2015).

 

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  • susan.thomas32

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