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Robin Moore’s Four Year Quest To Find Frogs Last Seen 160 Years Ago

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In 2010, photographer and conservationist Robin Moore set out on a global quest in search of frogs and salamanders that were last seen between 15 and 160 years ago. The undertaking was accompanied by over 120 scientists in 21 countries and took four years to complete.

It was worth the time and effort, however, and Moore’s journey produced some incredible rediscoveries, such as: the Ventriloquial Frog from Haiti, capable of throwing its voice, and the Borneo Rainbow Toad, which was unseen in 87 years. And, amusingly, a new species from Colombia was introduced called the “Monty Burns Toad,” which is reminiscent of the cartoon villain from The Simpsons.

From this quest came a book titled In Search of Lost Frogs, which includes information about the project and shows over 400 gorgeous photos of Moore’s findings. The sizes of each creature, their variations in color, and image quality are crystal clear. When you compare all the different frogs and salamanders, it’s remarkable just how many variations there are. It is that sentiment- one of hope and wonder – that Moore wants you to feel; to motivate you to care about the amphibians and the potential loss of their species. He explains:

As conservationists we often get so caught up in communicating what it is that we are losing that we forget to instill a sense of hope,” Moore says. “We need to revel in the weird and the wonderful, the maligned and the forgotten, for our world is a richer more wondrous place for them. Stories and images of discovery and rediscovery can help us to reconnect with our inner explorer – they can make us feel part of a bigger, wilder world. Rekindling a connection with the world beyond our concrete boxes is the key to caring about the way we are treating our natural world.

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Heather Marie Scholl Proves “It’s Hard Being a Woman” Through Feminist Embroidery

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Merging art, fashion, and feminism, Heather Marie Scholl uses hand-embroidered textiles and knit works of art to make social statements. In her latest project, “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman,” Scholl combines her own “personal narrative with larger conversations about the body, women, feminism, identity, and sexuality” to address male-on-female domestic violence and empower its victims.

Ironically alluding to Tammy Wynette’s song, “Stand by Your Man,” and imagined as a means of visual storytelling, the fashion installation project will present several of Scholl’s creations, spanning embroidery, clothing, and sculpture. The subjects of the garments and textiles featured in “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman”—which Scholl playfully refers to as her “second coming out”—range from portraits of women to quotations both empowering and unsettling. Given its highly potent and deeply personal content, it is no wonder that Scholl describes the sentiment behind the project as “an amazing ‘fuck you’ attitude.”

Be sure to check out Scholl’s intricate and empowering pieces at FiveMyles Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman” will be on view through November 7.

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Carolyn Lefley’s Narnia-like Scenes Bring The Outdoors Inside

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Carolyn Lefley uses photoshop to superimposes her photos of the outdoors on her photos of the indoors, creating hybrid images that combine our constructed environments with our natural environment. Lefley’s artist statement reads:

I make photographs that depict a world that floats between reality and fantasy, between believable spaces and sites of make believe.  I am interested in the relationship between literary fiction and fantasy stories and the inherent make-believe qualities of a photograph.  Photographs are windows to another world and as such have a magical quality to them.   In my new work ‘Realm’ I have created digitally altered photographs, where the familiar place of the home becomes a portal into mythical realm.  This fascinated authors such as C S Lewis and George MacDonald.  The realm of Narnia is entered through a wardrobe and the layers of fur coats inside which become trees.

Although she doesn’t state it herself, her images seem to be searching for the link between our place in nature and our feeling of belonging in our home. At this point, humanity has all but detached itself from our natural habitat, fighting to block out the chaos of the natural world with walls, ceilings, and floors. As she states, her photographs act as a window to a fantasy where we can feel at home in the natural realm, and reconcile our longing for reassurance in a world that is in reality, beyond our control. (Via I Need a Guide)

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Fabian Rook Compiles His Holiday Photo Album With The Help Of Google

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Instead of traditionally traveling the world, photographing the sights with a camera as he roams, Fabian Rook accumulates different snapshots via the comfort of his own home – with the help of his computer and Google. His photographic series is the result of entering key place names into his search bar and documenting where he ended up. By using the online digital tools of these search engines and satellite images to produce Fine Art, Rook is questioning the role of authenticity in image production and selling.

His photos are not dissimilar to those of landscape photographers Stephen Shore and Joel Sternfeld, but have a much different intention behind them, and another way entirely of being produced. Rook says this regarding his purpose:

“By reverting to the auto-produced landscape images taken by Google Street View and by not putting in an appearance of myself either as the author of an image or as an eyewitness, I highlight the meaning of the authorial and witness role in the production of photographic images.” (Source)

He not only exhibits Google-sourced landscape images as the finished project, but also superimposes elements from photojournalism and changes our understanding of what a place is. For example, he takes scenes of protesters from Iran and Greece and replaces them in a new setting of Sao Paulo. Or the street kids we see could either be playing together on the street, or running away from some authoritarian figure. Rook goes on to say:

“The locations and details converge and are exchangeable, while the pictures have the same variability and arbitrary quality that enables the user to switch continent in Google Streetview with a single mouseclick.” (Source)

His images are questionable and ambiguous, and this is his main aim – to point out how untrustworthy these sources are that we take at face value.

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Eugenia Loli’s Psychedelic Interdimensional Collages

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Illustrator Eugenia Loli assembles interstellar collages that are truly out of this world. A terrestrial globetrotter, Loli has lived in Greece, the UK, and the United States; her career has also spanned everything from computer programmer to nurse to filmmaker. Likewise, she seems to utilize disparate jigsaw pieces in her art and assembles them in ways that form a flawless whole.

The execution is truly flawless: whether it’s a woman driving into a galactic sunset or a jewel-encrusted roast beef dinner, Loli’s collages are transformative and transport the viewer into another universe. There’s also a vintage quality to the images, freezing them in time and space. In her artist’s statement, she says:

“Her collages, with the help of the title, often include a teasing, visual narrative, as if they’re a still frame of a surreal movie. The viewers are invited to make up the movie’s plot in their mind.”

There does indeed seem to be a sort of in media res quality to her illustrations, though it would seem that they would be just as inexplicable and magical even if the viewer had some inkling of how it all began. (via This Is Colossal)

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Iiu Susiraja, Her Mysterious Self Portraits, And The Argument Of The Anti-Selfie

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Finland-based artist Iiu Susiraja has an interesting array of conceptual self-portraits featuring her posing, in an unorthodox manner, with household items. Shot in domestic settings, Susiraja seems to be mocking domestic lifestyle, or possibly mocking the framework we feel we must live within: the operative chores and habits that are considered normal. The work is silly but layered. Susiraja wears items in the wrong way; leggings on her breasts, or taping high heels around her knees, the images are reminiscent of a childs brash reaction to something that makes no sense, but is so ritualized we stop questioning the absurdity of something like the discomfort of tall heels. Why do we wear them?

Certain blogs on the internet have been deeming this the “anti-selfie”, although, conceptual portraits have been around for nearly as long as photography has. We all remember Cindy Sherman, don’t we? It seems attaching a hyped up word such as selfie, which the encompassing item we have thrown today’s self aggrandizing

A selfie is a shot of one’s self, yes, but it is characterized by the blatant self-importance of it, the self-promotion, the self-self-self. It is, generally, a tactless and shameless documentation of ME. The only statement being made, if any, is a call for attention. We have only recently, as a society, begun to feel comfortable enough to do something once considered impolite or, selfish. While art could easily be argued to be some of these things, such as egomaniacal (and this would be an eternally long argument), you could hardly consider a conceptual portrait to be in the same ballpark, or game, as a selfie. Susiraja’s work is not an anti-selfie, it is simply art. If we compare her work with a generic selfie, there are some major differences in intention, audience, and presentation. What is the intention behind the piece; is the artist working as a medium to transmitting a message that reaches beyond the mere documentation of her own existence, or is it tepid self-promotion? Is the audience Instagram? And finally, was it shot on an iPhone? Taking these things into account, it appears calling work like this an “anti-selfie” would be like calling a letter an “anti-email.” Are we in a place to recategorized “art” and limit it by simply referring to it as an antithesis to a trendy movement it predated?

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Zhe Chen Documents Her Own Self-Harm

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Zhe Chen‘s confessional photographic series “The Bearable” has spanned a few years (2007 – 2010) and is a deeply personal journey of her own experiences with self harm. Her frank photos are very confrontational as she forces us to examine our own comfortability with such a terse subject. The close ups of bruised and battered skin, weeping nipples, bloodied and soiled sheets are not easily digestible images. In fact they are so hard to ignore, and are so powerful, that they immediately break down the taboos of any open discussion surrounding this subject. She says this about her work:

‘I hope my photographs inquire upon society’s prejudice and preconception towards this community, and not become illustrations or pictorial evidence for the topic at hand: every subject is an individual, not just ‘one of them’ – his or her life cannot be predicted or dictated by any constructed social code or notion. Depression plants the seed of introspection. I hope a first glance of my work conveys the idea of secrecy and sentiments, under which lies information awaiting exposure and recognition: like an index page pointing towards all the unanswered questions.’ (Source)

The L.A. based, Chinese artist teamed “The Bearable” series of her own self-mutilation with another, titled “The Bees“. Approaching the same subject from a different angle, she features a marginalized group of people in China who are so downtrodden and alienated that they feel the need to express their emotional oppression outwardly on their own bodies. Understanding the need for self-harm is such a complex story that most people tiptoe around, Chen wants to put it directly in front of us and see how we react.(Via Feature Shoot)

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James Viscardi’s Fashion Forward Stretcher Bars Wear Clothing

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James Viscardi’s current painting series at The Sunday Painter gallery has art engage with fashion in a way rarely seen. Art and fashion overlap on so many levels, whether it is a designer creating preliminary drawings for a dress or an artist incorporating the style of an era into their portraiture to record that point in time. Fashion is a form of visual expression as painting, drawing, sculpture, etc. Even the commodification of fashion can barely differentiate it from art, as portions of the art community become increasingly concerned with haute brand name artists like Jeff Koons or Damien Hirst that can easily be compared as the Karl Lagerfelds and Marc Jacobs’ of the art world.

It can’t be denied that art and fashion go hand in hand, though often it is fashion photography that will take on themes relating to art rather than artists referencing fashion. Viscardi’s artwork recognizes the expressive potential of a piece of clothing, as well as its affinities with painting materials. After all, canvas is cotton, as is your shirt. In an interesting reversal, Viscardi literally stretches the fashion element over an art structure, to repurpose fashion for art. Fashion is much more present in the general public consciousness than art is. Every person has some opinion on fashion, not every person has engaged with art. Viscardi uses both art and fashion elements to inform each other, and the result is a seamless union (pardon the pun). (Via i-D)

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