Stephen Orlando Records Motion In Light To Stunning Effect

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando uses LED light to track all sorts of movements from recording kayaking, canoeing, whitewater kayaking, swimming, and other sports. The images of paddle sports are stunning, like light skipping across water as a stone does. It’s fascinating how regular the strokes can be, but the most interesting are when they’re over uneven waters and the kayaker had to compensate. The pink, purple, and blue traces that are particularly nice because you can sense the slow stroke of the canoe paddle. The reflections of the light in the water are quite surprising as well.

Orlando explains his interest in recording these motions in light:

“I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph. Using LED lights with custom color patterns and long exposure photography, I’m able to tell the story of movement. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.

My photos focus on motions in nature and in urban landscapes, as well as human movement. I am inspired by the works of Étienne-Jules Marey, Anton Giulio Bragaglia, Gjon Mili, and Frank Gilbreth and their pioneering techniques.” (Via Colossal)

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Elly Heise’s Humorous Photographs Of Daughters Applying Their Mother’s Makeup

Elly Heise - Photography Elly Heise - Photography Elly Heise - Photography Elly Heise - Photography

Elly Heise is a commercial and fine arts photographer who’s created a series where daughters do their mother’s makeup. Some of the results are close to conventional makeup application, but for the most part the girls were very creative. Children, in art and evidently makeup, are always able to think outside the box. It’s exciting to see what they can come up with.

What’s a bit strange about the series is that the portraits are quite serious. In many the mothers look sad, and in combination with makeup that in some cases resembles bruising, it sends a mixed message.

Heise states of her fine art photography:

“My artistic practice often involves psychological inquiries I make concerning our identities. I see photography as a potential medium that can represent the outer physical identity of a subject while simultaneously expressing their natural drives. I hope that my work will cause my audience to consider the natural and unnatural influences that affect the formation of their own identities. I aspire to make images that give voice to the photographic subject’s realism and the humanity existing behind their masks.”

The #daughterdoesmymakeup series deals with themes of mask and identity. It highlights the absurdity of makeup as a mask with which to hide our natural beauty. It also demonstrates the creativity of a mind not yet strongly influenced by standardized beauty.(Via 123 Inspiration)

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Dean Bradshaw’s Senior Citizen Athletes Are Young At Heart

Dean Bradshaw - Photography Dean Bradshaw - Photography Dean Bradshaw - Photography Dean Bradshaw - Photography

Dean Bradshaw is an advertising photographer based in LA who’s created an entertaining series of portraits of senior citizen athletes. Their characters are hilariously over the top, though his attention to detail keeps them from being tacky. The colours are vibrant and youthful, and photos crisp to match the playfulness of the subjects. It’s obvious that the project was fun to put together.

Bradshaw says of his work:

“I’m drawn to storytelling, character and well-crafted, stylized imagery.

 

I’m attracted to the ‘why’ of things, the essential ingredients that comprise a story, a brand or a character – those elements below the surface which define the exterior. I enjoy immersing viewers in imagery that takes them into a world outside the ordinary. I’m fascinated by narrative, but find inspiration in the real world where things can be equally, if not more, peculiar. More than anything, I enjoy ideas – but realize that they are nothing without equal part execution.”

The images knock the severity out of sport imagery. The idea of an athlete is often limited to someone in peak physical condition, and necessarily younger. Though lifting a massive dumbbell may not be an activity recommended to the average senior citizen, sports are not exclusive to young people. Bradshaw’s series helps to broaden our perceptions of an older generation.

Check out his Instagram for more of his photography! (Via Design Boom)

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Ra Paulette’s Incredible Hand-Carved Caves

Ra Paulette - Permanent Installation  Ra Paulette - Permanent InstallationRa Paulette - Permanent Installation Ra Paulette - Permanent Installation

Ra Paulette has a very intimate relationship with the New Mexican mesas into which he carves intricately embellished caves. He does the work entirely on his own, and walks a mile just to reach the destination. The caves are overwhelmingly beautiful, especially when you imagine the process used to make them.

“My final and most ambitious project is both an environmental and social art project that uses solitude and the beauty of the natural world to create an experience that fosters spiritual renewal and personal well being.  It is a culmination of everything I have learned and dreamed of in creating caves.”

Paulette is concerned with social change. He tries to stir deep emotions to instigate that change instead of forcing it through direct confrontation.

“How can we change what we do before we change how we feel?”  Its underlying premise is that when through wonder and the sense of beauty we move from the emotional realm of our desires and fears to the more expansive and deeper feelings of thanksgiving and appreciation of life with a sense of its sacredness, our actions will automatically be modified, creating a better world – ‘like magic’.

 

This is the magic of art, music, theatre, and of the beauty of the natural world. We need for that magic to play a more direct role in our lives.”

He also speaks about his relationship to his process.

“Manual labour is the foundation of my self-expression. To do it well, to do it beautifully… engaging mental and emotional strengths as well as physical strength… Like a dancer, I ‘feel’ the body and it’s movements in a conscious way. I’m fond of calling it ‘the dance of digging’, and it’s the secret of how this old man can get so much done.”

Although the caves are not open to the public at the moment, there is a documentary called Cave Digger. (Via Juxtapoz)

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Nasa Funahara Recreates Famous Artworks Out Of Masking Tape

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Nasa Funahara recreates iconic artworks, like The Mona Lisa, and Girl With A Pearl Earring out of masking tape. The Japanese artist, who attends Musashino Art University as a painting Major, boasts a collection of around 450 rolls of masking tape. The series originally began as an art project for school, and she received a very good reaction to the work.

The artworks are well-detailed recreations. The patterns of the masking tape create a stimulating visual experience for the viewer. It is surprisingly not overpowering to see tons of brightly coloured roses and polka dots all in such close proximity. What’s astounding is that Funahara is able to find so many different types of tape. Apparently, masking tape in Japan has become an ornamental media, rather than just a tool to block off sections of a painting. According to Spoon and Tamago, each work is around the size of a tatami mat, and each takes about a week to make.

The Van Gogh reproduction of Sunflowers is the most successful work. The tape works well to imitate Van Gogh own style of brushstroke, and the colours are close to the original ones. Even the texture of the tape, sticking slightly out from the canvas, maintains a painterly effect and a kind of weight to the image. (Via Bizarre Beyond Belief)

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Pierre And Gilles’ Pop Icon Portraits Made With Sex And Glitter

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Pierre Commoy and Gilles Blanchard – Pierre and Gilles – have made portraits of Madonna, Jean Paul Gaultier, Andy Warhol, and Iggy Pop, just to name a few. The portraits are sexually charged and totally fantastical. Their subjects are placed under water, surrounded by flowers, or in what looks like a McDonalds ball pen (a not so subtle reference, in the tradition of most of their portraiture). Their kitschy and outlandish aesthetic has had them attain international recognition; they’re included in collections like the MoMA’s and have had a major retrospective at the New Museum in 2000.

Not only do they work together professionally, they have also been together as a couple for the duration of their shared career. Pierre is the photographer, and Gilles does the painting afterward. According to a VMagazine interview, the entire process of one portrait takes them about three weeks:

“We do everything from creating the décor to taking the picture to constructing the frame. We are always inspired by the person’s personality.”

Although their sexual orientation is a large part of their public persona, they say they are cautious not to pigeonhole themselves into what they call the “gay ghetto” and for this reason take portraits of a variety of celebrities they admire, while maintaining their own distinct style.

Their aesthetic is whimsical and edgy. Certainly setting a man up fully nude peeing into a garden of flowers is not an image you will see every day. It’s provocative, but not aggressive, probably because of the teasing, over-the-top nature of the accompanying imagery. They find a way to playfully bring the mainstream out of its comfort zone so it seems like every day should be filled with sexy nuns riding bedazzled horses!

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Sean Landers’ Sexual Characters And Rants About The Art World

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Sean Landers creates sometimes proud, other times dejected characters with oddly proportioned or placed body parts. Their exaggerated features help to communicate the absurdity Landers seems to see all around us. For instance, the tiny naked butterfly-eared man that stands in front of a microphone as if to try to be heard. It’s a strange proposition.

Much of Landers’ work is covered in handwritten text. It’s difficult to discern in the digital image, but the breasts with rabbit ears, aptly titled “bunny boobs” begins:

“This is preposterous, this Landers is an outrage does he expect us to take him seriously? Not only does he mock modernism but he also writes his mindless drivel all over each of his abominations. I have never read such vapid writing in my life, and his paintings are bad student work. I look at his resume and find he’s been exhibiting all around the globe for the last decade. Has everyone gone mad? Or is it that our standards have been eroded to the point that a hack like Mr. Landers is a celebrated international art star.”

The outraged tone of the fictional art critic is Landers’ response to reception of his work. He ends by saying:

“I get to vent, my paintings get better, they sell, I get confident, bash critics, they bash me back, sales stop, then I have to start over again.”

It’s not clear if this is an invented scenario, or a pattern that Landers often experiences, but certainly this kind of self-deprecating voice flows through his characters as well as in his text. Still, “bunny boob” is smiling out at the viewer (or critic) which makes it seem that it’s ultimately teasing, and maybe more lighthearted than the attitude the text sets.

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Damien Hirst Made Artwork That’s Actually Good

Washington

Washington

Paris

Paris

Detail

Detail

Rio

Rio

Damien Hirst’s exhibition at White Cube Sao Paolo, called Black Scalpel Cityscapes, is surprisingly compelling conceptually and technically intriguing. Hirst, though I’m sure I don’t really need to tell you this, reader, is a very divisive artist. His practice is a slippery one. It’s difficult to dismiss him, because he’s carved out a big space for himself in commercial galleries, but to some work, in example his spot paintings, feel a bit like an emperor wears no clothes scenario. It’s easy to argue that Hirst’s legacy is the success of his practice itself as a sort of art piece, and it would be true that he’s figured out some notable strategy for success, but whether it’s particularly honest or admirable is a question often dismissed by the powers that profit from Hirst or uphold his ideology.

In contrast to all this, Hirst’s most recent series is unexpectedly insightful. He recreates bird’s-eye view images of international cities using paint, surgical tools, and other industrial instruments. The materials for the Rio painting consist of Scalpel blades, skin graft blades, zips, stitching needles, aluminum filings, pins, stainless steel studs, fish hooks, steel wire cutting spool and gloss paint on canvas. On the White Cube website, Hirst’s statement reads:

Hirst investigates subjects pertaining to the sometimes-disquieting realities of modern life – surveillance, urbanisation, globalisation and the virtual nature of conflict – as well as elements relating to the universal human condition, such as our inability to arrest physical decay.

In the paintings, manmade features and natural elements such as buildings, rivers and roads are depicted in scalpels as well as razor blades, hooks, iron filings and safety-pins, all set against black backgrounds. For this exhibition, Hirst selected 17 cities, which are either sites of recent conflict, cities relating to the artist’s own life, or centres of economic, political or religious significance

What’s exciting about this series is that the themes Hirst claims to be examining are clear and his execution is effective. The paintings are visually impressive and also hold up conceptually, and most importantly, they tackle relevant political issues. Basically, it’s not bullshit. Congratulations, Damien Hirst. (Via The Fox is Black)

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