Read Between The Lines: Carl Krull’s Infinite Lines Reveal Hidden Faces

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull uses repetitive lines to form hidden faces revealed between the lines. Each drawing contains endless line after line that flows across the composition in waves, drips, and swirls.  The organic rhythm created is quickly interrupted by different shifts in its pulse, not unlike a line in a heart rate monitor. It is incredible how the orientation of the lines create such different effects, resembling the texture in tapestries or the grooves and patterns in a topography map… but only if the hills and mountains depicted were in the shape of faces! In fact, Krull’s large-scale drawings have been referred to as “human seismographs.”

Amazingly, the Danish artist came up with this technique by drawing lines during a road trip across the United States with his wife, acting as a “seismograph” would. Each bump, twist, and turn of the drive was incorporated into drawings, which are included in his series Scroll Drawings.

Krull’s work, created entirely from graphite lines, takes the human body form to a whole new level by letting the negative space between his lines to let the eye create the shape. Each bend in the line creates a rift in space in which you cannot tell whether the form is concave or convex. His drawings are as mysterious as they are intriguing, as they defy laws of space and gravity. The faces and appendages emerging from a sea of graphite mesmerize you while you search for more figures amongst the methodical chaos. The massive size of Krull’s drawings further pull you into the hypnotic repetitiveness of each composition, with figures that materialize right before your eyes.

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15 Examples of How Modern Hip Hop Artists Borrowed Fashion Styles From 16th Century Paintings

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

The tumbler B4-XVI berforesixteen has made a hilariously clever and all too accurate comparison between contemporary Hip Hop artists and paintings made before the 16th century, making everyone involved look quite ridiculous. When you first look at the fashion styles of centuries old paintings, you would not think anyone today would ever dream of looking like that, let alone a celebrity. However, if you think about it, what kind of person would wear flashy jewelry and frivolous fur coats? Well, Hip Hop artists! Their extreme amount of “bling” and often baggy clothing somewhat resembles the capes and jewelry of royalty depicted in classic paintings.

What makes the comparisons so on point is not just the uncanny similarities of clothing and accessories, but the position, stance, and even the facial expressions of both parties. I mean, what a lucky coincidence that Kanye West happened to be standing next to a priest for a hilarious comparison between himself and a painting of saints! Not to mention this goes perfectly with his infamous “Yeezus” complex. One aspect of Hip Hop style is missing from the series of 16th century paintings is the notorious “grill.” But don’t worry; there is instead a painting of two men proudly displaying their teeth while “mean-mugg’n” the viewer. This series of entertaining resemblances just goes to show you that every fashion style will make a comeback! (via Fubiz)

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Ari Weinkle’s Squirming Typography Made From Animal Appendages Will Make Your Skin Crawl

Ari Weinkle - Digital TypographyAri Weinkle - Digital Typography

Ari Weinkle - Digital Typography

Ari Weinkle has created an extremely unique and bizarre typography, titled Feelers, that moves and squirms with each carefully constructed letter. This is no ordinary alphabet; each letter is formed from different animal appendages. Weinkle designed his somewhat creepy typography to be explore and interpret the movements of animals and their body parts. It is hard to believe that these odd colored squiggles were once part of animals, especially since they look like amoebas, worms, or insect parts. The way the ends of the letters taper in at each end and sways back and forth closely resembles aquatic life such as seaweed moving in the water.

One aspect of this typography project that makes its concept so interesting, is trying to determine what appendage could have possibly made the type of movement that the individual letter is making. Even more intriguing, is that not every part of the letter moves. Some stand still while others whip back and forth, spread apart, or jump quickly away from the viewer. The movement is so organic, it is almost as if these alphabet creatures are pinned under a microscope and we are watching them squirm. Although the letters are hard to determine once they begin to wiggle, you cannot deny the unique creativity behind this mesmerizing typography. Make sure to check out Ari Weinkles Tumblr to see every single letter of his alphabet in its still form, and then again as 26 organically moving organisms.

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The Perfectly Grotesque Paintings Of Peter Saul: Shaking Down Politics Since The 1960’s

Peter Saul - Acrylic on Canvas1

Peter Saul - Acrylic on Canvas2

Peter Saul - Acrylic on Canvas

Peter Saul’s perfectly grotesque; strangely cartoonish paintings are filled with political and anti-political content. Having been born in the 1930’s, he has lived through an immeasurable amount of political turmoil. His highly illustrative paintings come bursting with endless social commentary, with more than just a bit of humor. Associated with the Chicago Imagists and the west coast Funk Artists, Saul’s style contains heavy influences from pop culture and surrealism. His distinctive style is harshly cartoonish due to the brilliant colors and flattened space. The characters in his paintings have bizarre, exaggerated features such as big, bulging eyes that pop out of the person’s skull, and tentacle-like appendages that bend and stretch clear across the composition. Although this may remind you at first of the cartoons you watched as a kid, examine the paintings longer and you will see enormous nude body parts and plenty of oozing bodily fluids. These hilarious and misshapen characteristics further express his thoughts on these characters; some real, some fiction.

Although Saul’s style is derived from sources many may see as lowbrow, his skills as a painter and an artist cannot be denied after seeing his complex, multifaceted compositions. Saul is a master at taking silly, iconic imagery from pop culture and mixing it with the grim, violence of reality. Experiencing his paintings is a journey through time, as they include imagery of the Vietnam War, Martin Luther King Jr., and Ronald Reagan. However, the messages and situations depicted in these scenes still ring true today. Peter Saul’s long art career is memorable to say the least. You can see his powerful work in person at Venus Over Manhattan gallery in NYC where his exhibition From Pop to Punk will be on display until April 18th.

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The Incredibly Sad Spaghetti Monster Of Artist Theo Mercier

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Internationally renowned artist Theo Mercier has created an incredible monster of a sculpture made entirely of spaghetti! This textural, monumental piece is around 10 feet tall, and that’s when it is sitting—which is all the time. The spaghetti monster sits upon a small chair that is way too small for him as he stairs sadly down at the ground. Titled Le Solitaire, or, “The Loner,” this creature looks isolated and alone in a world where he is the only spaghetti-creature. Although the colossal sculpture seems very melancholy, Mercier’s work tend to not be without a bit of humor. A monster made of spaghetti is an absurd and silly creation, so why is it so glum? Maybe it is afraid that us humans will eat his spaghetti!

Mercier’s work is often large and textural, as Le Solitaire’s tactile spaghetti-skin begs to be touched. The noodles form an endless series of lines bending and forming across the body of the creature. They imitate scribbles of continuous lines doodled on a piece of paper. A self-taught artist, Mercier is an expert at inducing strong emotions with such a bizarre and surreal sculpture. We cannot help to feel sorry for this dripping, sorrowful beast. Its wide, striking eyes that stare directly at the viewer are also in other works for Mercier’s. His other installations include funny creatures made by adding these same bright eyes onto cars, piles of hay, and even smoke seeping out from a fireplace. This French artist’s unusual and mysterious sculptures give inanimate objects such emotion and personality that steal our hearts and earn our love.

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David Emitt Adams Creates Photographs Of The Southwest On Tin Cans Found In The Desert

David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object

David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object

David Emitt Adams beautifully captures the landscape of the Southwest on the surface of discarded tin cans along with other debris he finds in the desert. Growing up in Yuma, Arizona, he is no stranger to the desert and the objects inhabiting it. Adams explains that deserts, naturally being so barren, are often used as a dumping site for garbage. This is where he finds all of his materials, with some tin cans being up to four decades old. He combines classic and iconic Southwest imagery with the reality of the state of the land today. Although the present day desert still holds immense and vast beauty, it is not without the remnants of urban sprawl left behind.

Throughout history, the West has long been photographed and documented due to its breathtaking and often unbelievable, natural landscapes. Adams not only pays homage to this tradition, but to its traditional processes as well. Inspired by the history of photography, the process he uses was one of the first methods of photography invented. Adams chosen method of photography is not your everyday digital photograph. He uses a labor intensive process invented in the mid-19th century called “wet-plate collodion.” This complicated process not only takes time, but an impressive amount of skill. Adams’ technical talents are only matched by the creativity of his body of work. Each tin can’s rich, red patina is still intact as they bend and twist around their lids, which hold the delicate image of the desert. This series, Conversations with History, is just one of several series in which Adams uses this traditional method of photography to express his artistic vision.

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Javier Galindo Questions The Idea Of Mementos By Altering Classical Antiquities

Javier Galindo - Cast Resin

Javier Galindo - Paint on Found Plaster

Javier Galindo - Cast Resin

Javier Galindo - Painted, Found Ceramic Set Into Cast Resin

Javier Galindo, an artist of many talents, uses ready-made objects to create an interesting narrative that comments on possessions we value. By nature, humans are collectors. So much so, that we even have an entire T.V. series dedicated to this hoarder phenomenon. In Galindo’s series The Incomplete Tour, he creates objects that mimic, question, and alter keepsakes and mementos often collected by travelers and tourists. Specifically, he references “The Grand Tour,” a trip that many youth would take during the 18th century across Europe. The purpose of this journey was to gain knowledge of the Western world’s cultural history and to be exposed to its many treasures, such as classical antiquity. To preserve their memories, as we often do today, they would collect souvenirs. Galindo’s question is, what is this memento actually worth? It is by no means an original; it is just a fragment or a trace of what was experienced.

Influenced by classic antiquities, Galindo’s series transforms and skews these fractures of remembered treasures. The series is comprised of a wide variety of mediums including cast plaster and oil paint, as it also is included two-dimensional and three -dimensional works. Focusing on portraiture, the once traditional portraits and busts are now sliced and stacked, skewed by paint, or literally cut out of their frame. In a world where we are obsessed with documenting every moment through digital photos, it is interesting to see a reference to a time where the only way to keep the moment with you, was through collecting physical souvenirs. A photograph is like a still memory, a fragment of an event that can often warp the true memory. Just like a photograph, Galindo’s mementos are just fragments of the whole; they are hints of a narrative further skewed by Galindo’s artistic eye.

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Slinkachu Reminds Us Of The Little Things In Life In His Photos Of A Miniature World

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

miniature installation

miniature installation

A person’s a person, no matter how small! Creating work under the name “Slinkachu,” this artist reminds us to pay attention to the little things in life in his miniature scenes. Photographed in London, Slinkachu constructs clever and irresistibly tiny scenes of people living their lives in the cracks of urban life. One small girl is swinging from a bent weed while other little people are diving off a Popsicle stick to swim in its melting juices. These photographs seem to capture a secret, pocket-sized world that exists right under our noses, reminding us to stop a while and take in our surroundings. This series also includes photographs of the little scenes in its real surroundings, giving it a sense of scale, revealing how small they really are.

These inch-high people are somewhat like the normal-sized urbanite, living in the shadows of tall buildings, just as Slinkachu’s people live in shadow. They are playing, swimming, and horseback riding in a concrete jungle, commenting on our own detachment from nature. However, this does not deter us from searching for it. We create our own nature in the form of city parks, just as Slinkachu’s playful little people find nature in a spilled soda pop, which they hop over like a pond. These hopeful scenes of miniature realities might criticize our separation from the natural world, but humorously point out our optimism and resourcefulness.

An exhibition of Slinkachu’s photographs titled Miniaturesque will be opening March 13th at Andipa Contemporary, located in London.

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