Rotganzen’s Melting Disco Balls

These melting disco balls are the work of German collective Rotganzen.  The installation,  titled Quelle Fête, features scattered disco balls in various stages of melting.  No longer operable or spinning, they lie lazily on the floor. Regarding the concept, Rotganzen says:

“Our conscious choice of the material and form contains a contrast to the message. It’s a reminder of the momentousness of glamour and swiftly passing glory. What once may have been a perfect shape takes on a new character and meaning. However, rather than a cynical take on reality, our intention is to offer a playful approach to observing our object of depiction.” [via]

Daan Botlek’s Street Art Of Figures Crawling Out of Their Skin

Dutch artist Daan Botlek creates commissioned murals and work for the street.  His art makes use of simply conveyed bodies often contrasting the inside with the outside.  Many of Botlek’s pieces illustrate a sort of literal introspection, looking inside each character.  The characters peel off, crawl out of, and smash off outer layers to expose the inner person.  Botlek works both in the gallery and on the street, his figures populating walls through out the city inside and out. [via]

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The Paper Art and Design of Maud Vantours

Designer and artist Maud Vantours works primarily in paper.  Using intricate cutting and layering techniques Vantours creates highly detailed pieces.  In this way, she also transforms an especially two dimensional medium into a three dimensional work with depth.  In addition to her paper art, Vantours has worked with high-profile clients such as Yves Saint Laurent, Lancôme, and Guzzini.  She’s incorporated her elements of her paper art work into designs ranging from food presentation to home decor.

A New Still Life from David Brandon Geeting

The photography of David Brandon Geeting is a new kind of still life.  His photographs capture everyday objects, found or arranged.  The compositions of the pieces almost seem to reference classical art.  However, the content reflects an ultra-modern obsession with objects, picture-taking, and boredom.  His pieces have a definite fine art aesthetic though they’re populated with banal household items.  Geeting’s work reflects a new kind of still life, that in turn reflects a new kind of modernity.

James Boock’s Machine Transforms Earthquakes Into Art

Industrial designer James Boock, along with the design team of Josh Newsome-White, Brooke Bowers, Hannah Warren, George Redmond, Richie Stewart and Philippa Shipley designed and built the Quakescape 3D Fabricator.  The fabricator uses earthquake data to visually represent the natural disaster.  The machine retrieves the earth quake data which is then transformed into paint formations.  Different color paint (representing different intensities of an earthquake) are poured onto the appropriate locations of a cross section of Christchurch, New Zealand.  The wet paint flows down mountains, pooling in valleys, further transforming the raw information into art.

Pixels and Blocks in Real Life from Pard Morrison

The work of artist Pard Morrison seems to reference both the analog and the digital at once.  His hard edged fields of color are reminiscent of image pixels or two dimensional mock ups of some sort.  Morrison often contrasts these blocks of color with a natural landscape barely touched by technology.  His work addresses how experience is increasingly mediated by technology – how a three-dimensional landscape is increasingly lived in two dimensions.  While these pixels and blocks build many images we experience everyday, they also can hide and obfuscate them. [via]

The Abstract Street Art of MOMO

MOMO is a street artist working internationally.  His pieces can range in size from relatively small to the size of city blocks.  It is his style, though that is peculiar.  His murals forgo text or figuration in favor of an abstract form.  His work often has a deceptively simple composition.  MOMO’s technique resembles simple print aesthetics while even referencing mid-century abstract painters.

Carlos Cruz Diez’ Ultra-Colorful Light Installations

 

Carlos Cruz Diez‘ choice medium in his installation Chromosaturation is simply color.  While we’re accustomed to seeing many different colors constantly and simultaneously, Diez uses only three colors presented one at a time as a departure point: red, green, and blue.  Diez saturates a room with one of these single primary colors of light.  The color floods from room to room, interacting with other colors, creating entirely new hues.  The light immerses the gallery space so thoroughly that the color almost takes on a physical aspect.  In his statement, Diez says:

“The Chromosaturation can act as a trigger, activating in the viewer the notion of color as a material or physical situation, going into space without the aid of any form or even without any support, regardless of cultural beliefs.”