The Laser-Like Thread Installations of Sebastien Preschoux

These photographs depict the carefully constructed installations of artist Sebastien Preschoux.  Preschoux installs his work on location – both in urban and forested settings.  He constructs intricate structures of thread that beam from and through the surroundings.  Through careful lighting, the pieces resemble lasers scanning the area, or giant spider webs strung across branches.  The mathemetical precision of Preschoux’s work contrasts with the unpredictable natural settings they fill.

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Joakim Ojanen’s Hallucinatory Mass Paintings

Stockholm, Sweden based artist Joakim Ojanen works in mediums as diverse as sculpture and zines.  His paintings, however, particularly standout.  Familiar snippets of cartoon characters, body parts, and shapes congeal as a hallucinatory mass.  Normally lighthearted characters appear to be in a paranoid panic or a manic giddiness.  Eyeballs peek from oddly placed holes or simply roll on the ground.  Ojanen’s portraits don’t seem to depict monsters as much as characters mutated by abstraction.

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The Dance of Undressing

Swiss/Danish art duo known simply as PUTPUT blurs the lines between photography, design, and conceptual art wonderfully.  For their series of photographs titled Undress, PUTPUT isolates a daily dance.  On the series, the duo comments:

” The ‘Undress’ series highlights an everyday choreography undertaken by the majority of people on a daily basis. The garment becomes central and embodies the movement.”

The photographs transform a mundane task into a beautiful flash of time.  Undress further presents an especially intimate and unguarded moment with the attention of an abstract artist.

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Anne Ten Donkelaar’s Delicate “Repaired” Butterflies

Artist Anne Ten Donkelaar‘s series Broken Butterflies takes its inspiration from a children’s book.  According to the story, because of his dream to create a mix between a flower and a bird, the protagonist Arno is banished to an insect workshop.  In a way, Donkelaar works from her own insect workshop.  She says:

“I had my own collection of damaged butterflies, so I decided to repair each one differently according to their needs. So in a way, I now have my own workplace with butterflies and give the butterflies a second life.”

Much of her work begins with objects that are often overlooked.  Infusing them with renewed attention and narrative, Donkelaar then reintroduces the object to the viewer.

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Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam’s Hand-Knit Playground

Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam began her career as a textile artist.  While exhibiting a piece titled “Multiple Hammock No. 1″ a couple of children in the gallery asked if they could use it.  Surprisingly she allowed the children to play on her sculpture.  The amusing incident led to an idea, and her work has since become much larger and fun.  Adding color, size, and interactivity, her work soon transformed from sculpture to public art and finally to playground.  The playground pictured here is hand knit by MacAdam and located in Tokyo.

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The Haunting Paintings of Maja Ruznic

Artist Maja Ruznic paints what she remembers.  Ruznic acts in a literal way on the idea that remembering is a creative process.  Painting from experience and filling in the unknown, her paintings feel like their plucked directly from the middle of a narrative.  Speaking of the way past experience plays into her creative process Ruznic says:

“Sometimes I am drawn to someone’s hands, to one’s rhythm of speech, to one’s constant checking of their cell phone.  This interest usually serves as an incentive to begin a painting.”

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Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

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The Sensual Ugliness of Brendan Danielsson’s Portraits

Brendan Danielsson‘s portraits are wonderfully ugly.  Though each piece incorporates the image of a sole person, there is plenty of conflict.  The pieces easily explore ideas of beauty and ugliness; they are at once sensual and repulsive.  While appearing almost alien each portrait is somehow still strangely familiar.  Danielsson is able to portray each ‘character’ as clearly part of a larger hidden narrative.

If you can’t pull your eyes away from Brendan Danielsson’s work, make sure to check out the Beautiful/Decay Book: 9.  The book features the paintings and drawings of Danielsson along with many other artists, designers, illustrators, and writers.

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