Banksy Pieces Transformed Into GIF Animations

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Serbian Tumblr gif artist ABVH has created animations based on some of Banksy’s iconic street art. These animations give life to Banksy’s poignant (but static) images by enlivening the experience of humor and absurdity that accompanies much of Banksy’s work. These gifs first began to appear in September of last year. Since then, ABVH has created a few more images, the latest of which was posted just last week. Be sure to follow the artist’s Tumblr page to check out more of these gifs as they appear.  Made By ABVH also features other animated gif work, included some rendered in 3D, requiring the use of proper glasses. (via we the urban)

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Human Organs Created Out Of Flora

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Human Organs sculpture

 

Bristol artist Camila Carlow creates these lovely renderings of human organs by foraging for wild plants, weeds, and the occasional animal part and then sculpting and arranging these various bits of flora. Her series, entitled “Eye ‘Heart’ Spleen,” recontextualizes images of organs such as a heart, lungs, stomach, uterus, liver, and testicles, demonstrating the reflection of internal biological structures with external natural structures. From Carlow’s site, “This work invites the viewer to regard our vital structures as beautiful living organisms, and to contemplate the miraculous work taking place inside our bodies, even in this very moment.” You can order prints and keep up with this particular project’s developments via its Facebook page. (via unknown editors)

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May Sum’s Finely Detailed Sculptures Carved Into Lipstick

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Hong Kong artist May Sum sculpts figures out of lipstick. While she sculpts animals and other objects, most of her figures are modeled on influential women in a series titled “Woman Power.” Lipstick comes in various shades, packaging, and shapes, and Sum uses this variety to her advantage creating a series of finely detailed iconic busts. The medium used to sculpt these women is fitting as powerful women are often judged against cultural ideals of beauty and image.

Sum doesn’t just limit herself to iconic women as subjects for her sculptures. She also takes custom orders. If you send her a photograph of what you’d like sculpted, she’ll create a miniature lipstick sculpture in its likeness. (via design taxi)

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Zack Seckler’s Humorous Photography

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Zack Seckler photographs

Photographer Zack Seckler‘s “Humor” series captures moments of absurdity and whimsy with a subtle aesthetic. His muted color palette and compositions often feature a single figure placed within a humorous context. The effect of the humor is subtle partly because of the color palette and also because it’s often just a small detail that catalyzes the humorous story in each photograph – one that is up to the viewer to interpret. Most of his photographs are composed of absurd juxtapositions and placements, recontextualizing activities or objects in order to point out some aspect of absurdity.

Seckler says, “People view life through their own lens. I enjoy refocusing that lens and playing with our expectations of the world. By putting an uncommon twist on common experiences, I create images that inspire humor and imagination. With that, I hope to expand each person’s view -– for at least a moment.”

Seckler lives in New York City.

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Haunting Photographs Of Jakarta Street Monkeys Wearing Dolls’ Faces

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Finnish photographer Perttu Saska has created this unsettling series of Jakarta street monkey photographs titled “A Kind Of You.” These monkeys are captured as they are: dressed in children’s clothes and wearing doll faces, their chains often visible. Apparently, training and dressing monkeys to act like humans to ask for money is an Asian tradition – one that has escalated to dire conditions and circumstance for these poor creatures.

Thankfully, upon searching for more information about these monkeys and this tradition, I stumbled across a BBC article published yesterday that cites the removal of the first 11 out of 350 monkeys from Jakarta streets. They have been quarantined where they will likely remain for a few months before they can be released back into the wild. Since 2009, animal rights activists have been campaigning against this cruel tradition, and hope that this initial removal will set the stage for complete banishment of this cruel practice.

Of his series, Saska writes, “Modern city culture has turned the old tradition in to eerie and haunting act of cruel street theatre where animals become something else, never able to reach our expectations.” With the awareness created by people like Saska and animal rights activists, these Indonesian monkeys hopefully won’t have to be subjected to the unreasonable expectations of their human handlers any longer. (via ufunk)

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Parastou Forouhar Covers Gallery Walls With Persian Calligraphy

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Persian Calligraphy

After her parents were murdered in Tehran, Parastou Forouhar was exiled to Germany. Just like her parents, Forouhar is critical of the Iranian government, and it is with this adherence to and separation from her Iranian identity that her work is based. Forourhar says, “The production of identity, and the repressive mechanisms by which it is reified, comprise the focus of my work. My homeland, Iran, is a constant theme in my artistic practice, but the conception is complex and continuously in flux. Beyond Iran, there is also the collective memory of Germany, where I have lived since 1991. When I arrived there, I was Parastou Forouhar, but I have since become ‘Iranian.’ Every space I inhabit is accompanied by a feeling of displacement.”

For her “Written Room” project, Forouhar covers the blank surfaces of gallery and museum spaces with Persian calligraphy. This creates an elegant aesthetic that is fragmented and fluid. “Whereas the white walls of the gallery room are raised to a universal norm and an unmarked instance, the Oriental ornament stands for difference or the deviating.The writing is also strange, if not alien, because it is illegible for Western visitors – as an ‘incomprehensible’ text it becomes a pure ornament. In defying attempts by Western visitors to assign it meaning, the script remains locked into its irreducible pictorial graphicness and indissoluble representation.” Even if one had a grasp of the Persian language, they would only be able to decipher fragments and syllables of the language that are not part of any linear order. Forouhar’s work ultimately seeks to bridge the gaps in her identity as an Iranian and German. (via fubiz)

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Justine Khamara’s Warped Photograph Collage Sculptures

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The work of Melbourne based artist Justine Khamara may at first appear to be digital manipulations, but these sculptures are in fact photographs that have been physically manipulated. By cutting, shredding, and shaping pieces of mostly portrait photographs, Khamara creates these absurd and warped images. She sculpts some photographs into spheres or other three-dimensional forms, others she weaves or skews but maintains more of the image of the original photograph, only with a warped effect. In some of her work, she has copied the image of a single body part multiple times, and sculpted fractal-like shapes that give an appearance of continuity. The hand-cut precision of these constructions demonstrates Khamara’s fine attention to detail and use of a medium that usually utilizes a broader variety of images. (via skumar’s)

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Endia Beal’s Portraits Of White Women With Black Hairstyles

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Photographer Endia Beal has created corporate-style portraits of white women with hairstyles often worn by black women for her series, “Can I Touch It?”. Beal was first inspired to do this project after interning in the IT department at Yale while she was there earning her M.F.A. At the time, Beal, who is tall and black, was sporting a large red afro. She stood out among her mostly shorter, white male colleagues, and one even mentioned to her that a rumor was circulating around the office that the men were curious about her hair and wanted to touch it. She eventually asked some of her male colleagues to touch her hair, and even pull it. A week later, she recorded their reactions. She wanted the men to experience something new, and they were admittedly uncomfortable.

She next sought out middle-aged women who work in the corporate world for “Can I Touch It?”. “I wanted people that had a certain idea of what you’re supposed to look like in the workspace, because it would be a challenge for them to understand what I experienced in that space…And to a degree, many young white women have shared that experience, but for older white women it’s an experience they haven’t necessarily had.”

“I said, ‘I am going to give you a black hairstyle,’ and they were like, ‘You’re going to give me cornrows?’ ” Beal recalls. “And I said, ‘No, we’re going to do finger waves.’ ‘Finger waves? What’s that? You mean from the ’20s?’ And I said, ‘These are a little bit different type of finger waves!’ ”

She says the women were excited to learn something new and to show off their hairstyles. Through this project, Beal hopes to start a conversation among people who come from various gender, race, and generational backgrounds, especially within the rigidity of a corporate environment. She is currently in North Carolina continuing this project, and is considering having the women enter and work at their offices with these new styles, after which she would record their experiences. (via slate)

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