Zadok Ben-David’s Hand-Painted Metal Meadows

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The installations of London-based artist Zadok Ben-David‘s miniscule metal flowers are detailed, dense and mesmerizing. His travelling series of the work (called Blackfield) appeared in London, Portugal, Sydney, Singapore, Berlin, Linz, Untergroningen, Seoul, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Derived from illustrations appearing in 19th century Victorian encyclopedias, each iteration contains nearly 20,000 delicate 3-D floral etchings.

Each individual flower is crafted from metal and each side is hand-painted with either a stunning meltdown of color—or a heavy coat of black. Hovering between breathtaking and completely disturbing, the flat, sketch-like sculptures seem ominous as they stand in perfect rows, tucked into a massive bed of white sand.

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Smart Billboards That Lend A Hand And Interact With Passerby’s

Ogilvy & Mather for IBM Ogilvy & Mather for IBM

Ogilvy & Mather for IBM

Rarely does advertising serve up such a smart, practical use of media like the new IBM campaign (designed by Ogilvy France). The intriguing billboards incorporate flat design in a 3-Dimensional capacity, building benches, awnings and helpful ramps to make the urban landscape a little bit “smarter.” By rethinking this simple medium, their message links the tech giant with innovation, intelligence and ingenuity in the physical world—a major feat of creative strategy. [via]

Watch a video of the billboards in action after the jump.

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Berndnaut Smilde’s Indoor Cloud Collection

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde – Making Clouds from The Avant/Garde Diaries on Vimeo.

When viewing (usually photographic) evidence of Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde‘s  fantastical cloud works, the first question is usually: “Is it real?”

Yes, it’s actually a small, perfect indoor cloud.

The next question you might have is “How?” The answer is shrouded in Smilde’s process, which requires deftly precise observations of humidity, temperature, air movement and lighting. Existing for just one perfect moment, then slipping away, his clouds are carefully documented via photograph, but in the video above—the viewer gets a glimpse at the cloud-making event, narrated by the artist. The strange, beautiful creations appear and fades, serving as both a physical phenomena and a lilting metaphor for grasping at the ephemeral.

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David Marc Grant’s Painted Collisions Of Pattern And Color

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Painter David Marc Grant‘s fantastical, somewhat neo-surrealist paintings on panel showcase a sophisticated sense of both color and composition. The layers of each piece seem to prop up the next, leaving plenty of corners and pockets for Grant to explore his interest in small detail and pattern. Although the compositions are mostly abstract collisions of geometric shapes and thick, viscous liquids—the artist positions the work as a mirror for the collapse of contemporary society. Grant’s inclination for abstraction disguises these artistic intentions in an attractive blend of quirkiness and color, leaving the viewer with a candy-coated version of dystopian landcape.

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Dillon Marsh Investigates South Africa’s Cell Phone Towers Disguised As Trees

Invasive Species, Kraaifontein (2009) Dillon MarshInvasive Species, Athlone (2009)

Using photography as a tool for generating evidence, South African artist Dillon Marsh approaches the creation of his serial landscape works with the methodology of a researcher. Marsh is constantly looking to capture his subjects “in the wild,” and his watchful eye has yielded a variety of interesting results—with some topics touching on landscape, ownership and disruption in both realms.

For his “Invasive Species” series, Marsh captures instances of oddly jarring, slightly unapologetic occurrences of poorly disguised cell phone towers as they dot the South African landscape. He notes: “In 1996 a palm tree appeared almost overnight in a suburb of Cape Town. This was supposedly the world’s first ever disguised cell phone tower. Since then these trees have spread across the city, South Africa and the rest of the world. Invasive Species explores the relationship between the environment and the disguised towers of Cape Town and its surrounds.”

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Illustrator Mr. Kiji’s Advice For Young Guns

Mr. Kiji

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Artist/designer Mr. Kiji has already had a prolific career for someone so young, but his work across mediums and markets (ranging from paint to pixels) is all part of a much bigger vision he has for living a wholly creative life. In this video, he gives some sage advice to young upstarts, and discusses how he pulls inspiration and enthusiasm into every single project—whether it’s art or advertising creative for giants like Google and Converse.

 

 

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The Lustrous Language Of Ben Skinner

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It’s a tricky thing, viewing the work of artist Ben Skinner—you catch yourself reading, absorbing, appreciating and simultaneously fighting the urge to snap a photo and immediately re-appropriate his multimedia text works to your own blog/Instagram/Twitter. Using an intriguing selection of materials (ranging from gold foil to neon to sprinkles), Skinner elegantly spells out heartbreaking phrases ripped from the Zeitgeist, with a little extra flair. The witty, multicolored multimedia works tow the line between design and art, with a little extra emphasis on drawing, craft and the making of an actual object. Many of his works could easily find a life as a piece of printed design, but it’s Skinner’s willingness to experiment with materials that allows his flat, graphic works to go one step further into the realm of something more substantial.

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Jay Shinn Applies Projected Light To Painted Forms

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Staring at the solid blocks of color, the light shifts and patches of bright light begin to pull forward from the wall—where works by artist Jay Shinn exists with perfect geometric precision. Angular and illuminated by a small overhead projector, the pieces seem to float just above the surface of the wall, feeling simultaneously tangible and ethereal with their reflective, neon-like rays. Shinn has previously worked with elements of symmetry, suspended light, and illusion with his varied serial investigations in mirror, pencil-on-paperneon and paint. He experiments with placement, perception and disorientation in these works, paying careful attention to color selection, form and relative scale. The result is slightly mesmerizing, if not entirely hypnotic.

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