About Nathaniel Smith

s00ry$%br0

Phillip K. Smith III Transforms Abandoned Cabin In The Desert Into A Reflective Beacon

lucid-stead-mirrors-the-joshua-tree-desert-designboom-03

aqtm8gbyw4u3hsf0

lucid-stead-mirrors-the-joshua-tree-desert-designboom-05

American artist Phillip K. Smith III found inspiration from the most basic of places in his recent project, Lucid Stead. Taking a small cabin which had been slowly eroded by the harsh environments of the Joshua Tree Desert for seventy years, Smith III modified the existing structure, adding mirrors between aged wood slats and changing LED panels to the door and window frames. By day, the desert scenery is reflected upon the modified mirrored slats, while the piece illuminates the desert landscape by night. The artist explains Lucid Stead,  “This project is about tapping into the desert, into the pace of change, and is about responding to the quiet of the place. And ultimately, in that quite, the project begins to unfold.” 

While the piece has a decidedly aesthetic-first quality, Smith explains that there are four ideas at play in Lucid Stead - “Light and Shadow” (the interaction with the sun, and changes in the reflections of its light), “Reflected Light” (within the mirrors, using the desert as a medium placed on the shack), “Projected Light” (the LED lights within the shack, pure color illuminating the cracks and openings of the structure), and “Change” (the shifting colors of the lights, which change so slowly as to be almost unnoticed). Smith III continues, “The project really is about slowing down…stopping and being quite so you can truly see and listen.” (via from89 and designboom, additional images via Kevin Smith, archinect)

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Chris Labrooy Stretches Reality With ‘Auto Aerobics’

Chris Labrooy

Chris Labrooy

Chris Labrooy auto aerobics

Chris Labrooy (previously featured here) is United Kingdom based artist and graphic designer who thrives in small projects which take a small idea and run with it. His most recent project, Auto Aerobics began as an exercise in place and context. Inspired by a winter trip to Brooklyn, La Brooy began to manipulate a Pontiac car which originally only served as a background object, but became the focus of the entire series.

By taking the familiar shapes and forms of the American Auto’s chassis, La Brooy digitally manipulates them by bending, stretching and combining, and seemlessly building them into the landscapes which they were inspired by. The bizarre, impossible, and totally impracticle images result in strikingly memorable floating sculptures that feel both alien and familiar. (via ignant)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ulrich Collette’s Spliced Portraits Shows Incredible Genetic Similarities In Relatives

Ulrich Collette

Father / Son: Denis, 60 & Mathieu, 25 years

Ulrich Collette

Grandmother / Granddaughter: Ginette, 62, & Ismaëlle,12

Ulrich Collette

Daughter / Mother: Marie-Pier 18 & N’sira, 49

Ulrich Collette

Father / Son: Denis, 53 & William, 28 years

Photography has long been used to document the scientific process and display visual evidence, so when Ulric Collette began to use the medium to show how genetics can exhibit itself, it was both the obvious similarities, and differences, that caught everyone’s attention. Working out of Quebec, Canada, Ulric, a self-taught photographer and graphic designer, began the photoseries in 2008 where family member’s faces were spliced together to create portraits that compared physical appearance with contrasting ages. The process seems like a no-brainer, but it was truly born from an accident. The photographer explains, “I was attempting to create something totally different with another project, and in the process I came up with the first picture, me and my then 7-year-old son,”. Realizing the easily viewed comparison between generations when shown spliced together, Ulric began to enlist the help of others to show the effects of genetics. He continues, “I decided to try the same process with a few family members and the project was born.”

Collette uses specific portraits edited down from hundreds of tightly-controlled photos, to create his finished works. Acknowledging that even with the advances of editing software, it is still very difficult to find an appropriate match that works, he explains the difficulty of the project, “I need to take a lot of pictures in a controlled environment of each model, compare the picture to one another, chose the right ones and stick them together in Photoshop” .

The photographer used many of his own family members to investigate these connections, including his daughter and mother (above, Ginette & Ismaëlle), and even himself and his own brother (below, Christopher & Ulric). Collette explains, “The reaction to the project never ceases to surprise me…A few of the ones I’m in shocked me – me and my brother Christopher, for example, we totally look the same!” (via huffington post and bbc)

Currently Trending

Patrick Martinez’s (Pop) Culturally Poignant Neon Signage

a dream deferred

A Dream Deferred

American Melting Pot 1 Chinese Mexican

American Melting Pot 1 Chinese Mexican

shit is sweet

Shit is Sweet

 

Los Angeles-based artist Patrick Martinez (previously featured here) not only works with the messages that are seen daily on Any Major Inner City Street USA, he also uses the favored communication method of the majority of these messages to give additional contextual weight to his artistic turns of phrases. While Martinez has been lauded as The Man in Art & Design 2013 (Complex Magazine), Latinos on the Rise as well as Artist on the Rise at Scope Miami, it seems to sell the artist’s work short by boxing it in to an ethnic or inner-city-only messages, considering the crux of his work focuses on themes (consumerism, globalism, mental and physical health, violence, money, race, and a multi-cultural future) which effect the broadest ranges of a global society. To simply state that he uses the vernacular of the disenfranchised would be limiting the unique, darkly-egalitarian perspective Martinez brings to his work, as well as the implication against an unnamed force that keeps the Everyman (no matter their ethnicity or background) from achieving the most basic of human goals. Martinez expands on this idea, “People feel it’s accessible, complex but it still invites. It’s like a kiss on the cheek and a punch to the gut all at the same time.  It’s not elitist, but relatable.”

While many of the artist’s works freely delve into multimedia (the combination of still-life realism painting with neon sign craftsmanship), Martinez’s works statement claims a simpler message. “Patrick focuses on the phenomenology of his surroundings. He brings sublime beauty to things that aren’t thought of as conventionally beautiful. He uses subject matter such as everyday people that aren’t usually painted into the limelight and elements of the city that would be thought of as objects we take for granted.”

Martinez’s upcoming exhibition, Buy Now, Cry Later at Public Functionary in Minneapolis, MN, promises to continue this tradition simultaneous cultural exploration and criticism. By focusing a glowing eye on the viewer, Martinez builds metaphors of consumption and the unending needs of Capitalism and the Human Spirit in the modern world. Buy Now, Cry Later opens Friday, November 15th and runs through Friday, December 20th.

Currently Trending

Akane Moriyama’s Beautifully Chromatic ‘Cubic Prism’

akane-moriyama-cubic-prism-designboom01

akane-moriyama-cubic-prism-designboom02

akane-moriyama-cubic-prism-designboom03

akane-moriyama-cubic-prism-designboom04

By all accounts, particularly documentation photos, Akane Moriyama’s newest installation appears to be nothing more than floating colors. The piece, titled Cubic Prism, is actually large skeins of prismatic and semi-transparent polyester fabric, ethereally suspended between two buildings in the courtyard of Goldsmith Hall at the University of Texas, Austin. Cubic Prism shows both rigid characteristics (the ‘skeleton’ of the piece holds it’s cubed shape) as well as the looseness of flowing fabrics.

Akane Moriyama, a designer who was born in Japan and is currently based in Stockholm, Sweden, uses her background in textile design to create such works. By hanging more than 150 large pieces of sewn fabric, the cubed form resembles a canopy (or hammock) shape. Natural elements such as wind obviously effect the installation, though perhaps the most interesting reaction is the natural color play of light and sun when seen between the almost translucent fabric layers. This colorplay activates the entire courtyard, buildings and natural environment for viewers, giving off gorgeous multi-colored glows. (via from89 and designboom)

Currently Trending

Joe Black’s Pop Art Portraits Created Out Of Thousands Of Small Items

d1-638x10249tif-682x1024

MOa-728x1024

moa2-1024x682

Joe Black is an artist who uses Pop Art against itself. Collecting iconic imagery (often choosing those which have already been famously exploited by other artists), Black creates large-scale hued portraits using copious amounts of consumer items. One of many artists using collected masses of materials into larger mosiac-style works, Black claims that he is open to using any material as long as it is small and plentiful (past pieces have used Lego pieces, toy soldiers, pins, ball bearings, badges) and relates to the source image. These images, which are best seen from a distance of fifty feet, offer a contextual surprise for viewers upon closer inspection.

Though trained as an artist and painter, Black claims to be uncomfortable labeling himself a professional artist, preferring to consider his work more based on image-making and craftsmanship. One such aspect is the time-consuming application of several thousand smaller pieces which make up his whole images, which Black hand-alters by using aerosol to add tones that give gentle gradients which become the lines and shading of the portrait.  (via u1u11)

Currently Trending

A Sculpture That Breathes- John Grade’s Weather-Reactive ‘Capacitor’

John Grade Capacitor1

John Grade

John Grade sculpture

John Grade’s Capacitor is a site-specific installation which reacts to the climate of the site it inhabits. Located within the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, this enormous coil is roughly 40′ x 20′ x 20′ and slowly reacts to the changing wind directions and temperatures of the outside environment. Physically behaving according to statistics collected outside the institution, a mechanized controller within the installation powers the enormous coil’s shape. According to Grade, “the whole of the sculpture will appear to be very slowly breathing”. Capacitor also changes the brightness of the lights within the construct, giving an entire reaction to outside elements. (contemporist and artist’s site)

Currently Trending

Sophia Chang’s Architectural Boundary Blending Installation ‘Suspense’

sophia chang sophia chang installation sophia-chang-suspense-designboom01

sophia-chang-suspense-designboom02

The work of architect and designer Sophia Chang, Suspense is a site-specific installation that blends the inner and outer environments of a gallery space. A recent graduate with distinction at Harvard Graduate School of Design, Chang created Suspense at Invivia Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

By pulling large sheets of Lycra between rectangular frames, her work creates an interactive, suspended environment which both blurs yet highlights the building’s pre-existing architectural features. Some rooms are completely explorable, while others remain visible yet restricted by the installation. Says Chang, “The whole piece holds itself in shape under the tensile forces of being stretched without any extra pneumatic input – except perhaps the breeze flowing in and out of the two doors!” (via designboom)

Currently Trending