Andrew Scott Ross’ Elaborate Paper Dioramas Recreate Ancient History

Paper Diorama's

Paper Diorama's

Paper Diorama's Paper Diorama's

Artist Andrew Scott Ross is interested in the ancient past, and uses it to better understand the present.  Curious about the way museums present items from the past, Ross creates paper-dioramas, drawings and sculptures to display his own versions and representations of history.

In his 2013 work Tilden and the Theban Hero, for instance, Ross used photographic reproductions of Greek and Roman art from the Michael C. Carlos Museum near Emory University’s campus as a point of departure.  He then cut by hand several elements and combined them to create an imaginative, large-scale installation.  The piece employs Greek mythology as well as elements of Ross’s personal history.  Informative, fun and engaging, Ross’ installations almost come to life before a viewer’s eyes.

See his work later this summer at the Winter Gallery at Millersville University in PA.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Peter Chinn’s Impressive Images Of Baby Animals In The Womb

Elephant

Elephant

Horse peter chinn

Horse

Bats peter chinn

Bats

Dolphin peter chinn

Dolphin

Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

Producer Peter Chinn used a combination of dimensional ultrasound scans, tiny cameras and computer graphics to create these photographs of baby animals.  Chinn made the images for a National Geographic documentary called Extraordinary Animals in the Wombwhich tracked the process of growth, from conception to birth.

Aside from being scientifically interesting, these images are visually engaging.  We (or at least I) rarely imagine what different animals look like inside the womb, and beyond being informative Chinn’s photographs are actually kind of beautiful (if you don’t over analyze the blood and guts).  Except for the shark, that one is still kind of scary.  (via viralnova)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Valerie Hegarty And Three Other Artists Who Have Mastered The Art Of Illusion

Valerie Hegarty

Valerie Hegarty

Fanette Guilloud

Fanette Guilloud

Kyung Woo Han

Kyung Woo Han

Thomas Quinn

Thomas Quinn

Valerie Hegarty’s Alternative Histories was installed at the Brooklyn Museum in one of their Period Rooms.  Hegarty’s site-specific installations toy with a viewer’s perception—they create the illusion that the process of destruction or decay has been accelerated and what we see are the remains of the real artwork.

Thomas Quinn is a Chicago designer who experiments with something called “anamorphic typography.”  When viewed from a certain angle the text looks just right, but when one moves around the text morphs and warps.

Fanette Guiloud is also interested in anamorphic projection and used the method to create a series of photos titled Géométrie de l’impossible (Impossible Geometry).  Only 22-years old, the illusion is impressively successful.  Influenced by artists such as Felice Varini, Guilloud is certainly an artist to keep our eye on.

Creating installations that defy logic and inspire wonder South Korean artist Kyung Woo Han says of the work, “All the facts are relevant. People see what they want to see. One fact can be interpreted in several ways depend on our perceptions. In the opposite, two different facts can be looked the same. My work deals with perception and illusions. Everything we see or what we know is not absolute. I suggest various ways to perceive things with slightly different perspectives.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Three Artists Who Transform Origami Into Incredible Fine Art

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Russian artist Pavel Platonov experimented with origami because of his inclination toward sharp, angular, geometric forms.  Better known as a photographer who works with a unique and surreal type of portraiture, Platonov’s sculptures have a reflective quality to them, allowing a viewer to learn something about himself while observing the work.  Bizarre and often placed in natural settings Platonov’s pieces allow a viewer to encounter and react to discovering something strange and out of place.

Interested in the idea of a final image juxtaposed with the process of achieving that final image, artist Marc Fichou experimented with the conceptual process of folding, and unfolding, origami forms.  Drawing attention to the way our mind makes the connection between the two contrasting images, which don’t directly or immediately resemble one another, Fichou creates works that are visually compelling, and intellectually engaging.

Born to teenage, Mexican-American gang members, artist Gerardo Hacer escaped to fantasy worlds via the art of origami.  Learning to make paper cranes at some point during his stay in a string of foster homes Hacer combined that outlet with an inspiration found in Calder’s Los Angeles sculpture, “The Four Arches.”  Hacer decided to become an artist and even changed his name, “Gomez-Martinez,” to “Hacer,” which means “to make” in Spanish.  Hacer became a sculpture who creates large-scale origami forms, engaging his original love for origami with his desire to create substantial and impressive works of art.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Anders Krisar Creates Surreal Sculptures By Dissecting Bodies And Puting Them Back Together Again

Anders Krisár

Anders Krisár Anders Krisár Anders Krisár

Stockholm-based Anders Krisár is interested in exploring issues surrounding the human body.  Employing realistic casts of body parts Krisár then modifies them.  He imbues typical torsos, arms or faces with atypical assets and surreal qualities that are at once quiet and horrific, striking and bizarre.

Evoking a sense of how fragile the human body is, Krisár’s forms stir up feelings of discomfort.  Unnatural, ridiculous and sometimes even violent, the sculptures are so successfully disturbing because they are so meticulously executed. Rendered exactly and simply—skin looks like skin, body parts almost appear to be moving and breathing— Krisár’s works are convincing.  But at second glance there is always something distinctly wrong.  Torsos are freakishly imprinted, headless or morphed.  Bodies are severed, separated or broken. Krisár’s works thus become visual representations of the unfeasible.  This un-reality gives the pieces a psychological edge.

Beyond the challenge of confronting the bizarre so perfectly portrayed Krisár incorporates ideas of splitting, mirroring and twinning, which are frequent themes in psychoanalysis.  Erie yet captivating this psychological aspect gives Krisár’s work the ability to be emotional.  Though the work has a quiet quality, its effects are powerful.  A viewer’s sense of certainty is challenged and replaced with insecurity, question and an overall awareness that what we know only scratches the surface of what is possible.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Su Blackwell Creates 3D Fairytale Dioramas Out Of Books

dioramas Su Blackwell dioramas book dioramas

Often working within the realm of fairy-tales and folk-lore, artist Su Blackwell cuts out images from books to create three-dimensional dioramas.  Her material is important to her.  Interested in both the fragility and the strength of paper, as well as the conceptual depth of old books, Blackwell finds something both accessible and precarious in her method.  Believing in the power of imagination (an avid reader herself) Blackwell transforms description into a version of enchanted reality—the story becomes another translation of the story.

She says of her works, “I tend to lean towards young-girl characters, placing them in haunting, fragile settings, expressing the vulnerability of childhood, while also conveying a sense of childhood anxiety and wonder.  There is a quiet melancholy in the work, depicted in the material used, and the choice of subtle colour.”

A scene caught in time, presented as if it grew out of the book itself, Blackwell’s sculptures are fantasy turned reality, which still manage to feel like fantasy.  There is precision, attention to detail and a feeling of diligence present in Blackwell’s pieces each functioning to further both the illusion and the veracity.  Inciting wonder, curiosity and imagination all at once, Blackwell’s sculptures are like fantastic little worlds all unto themselves that a viewer feels lucky enough to catch a glimpse of.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Miguel Vallinas Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals

Miguel Vallinas Miguel Vallinas Miguel Vallinas Migues_Vallinas4

Interested in the idea of anthropomorphism, Madrid-based photographer Miguel Vallinas retouched animal photographs and made it appear as though they were wearing human clothes.  Though an initial reaction may be to dismiss Vallinas’ images as something of a cliché, the richness of the photographs combined with the humor have a charm to them that is alluring and endearing.  Segundas Pieles (Secon Skins), is an ongoing project that explores notions beyond anthropomorphism.  In fact, Vallinas’ photographs seem to accurately investigate concepts such as psychology, stereotyping and personality.  The images of the primly dressed swan, or the melancholy donkey portray emotion and narrative beyond simple humor.

Attempting to depict the way he imagined different animals would dress if they had the ability to, Vallinas plays off our preconceived ideas of what our clothing choices signify and what we may, even subconsciously, believe about certain animals, certain people and ourselves.   (via Colossal and dailymail)

Read More >

Currently Trending

David Mach And Four Other Artists Who Cleverly Create Creatures

David Mach

David Mach

Marta Klonowska

Marta Klonowska

Kristi Malakoff

Kristi Malakoff

Diem Chau

Diem Chau

Irving Harper

Irving Harper

Because it’s still the beginning of the week, and because who doesn’t love animals, here are five artists who cleverly create creatures as part of their work.

David Mach uses everyday items to create large-scale sculptures and installations.  His cheetah and tiger, for instance, are created solely out of coat hangers.  Laying hundreds of them together Mach created two rather ferocious creatures.

Polish artist Marta Klonowska assembles carefully broken shards of colored glass to create translucent animals of life-like proportion and size.  Influenced by the animals seen in baroque and romantic paintings, Klonowska sought to re-make an old idea in a new way.

Kristi Malakoff is a Canadian artist interested in using animals in her art because of “swarm theory,” or “swarm intelligence,” which suggests that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.  In other words, the theory posits that the limits of the individual are overcome by collective intelligence.  This installation consists of 6000 color copies of butterflies on transparency material.

An unconventional use of the medium, Seattle artist Diem Chau works with graphite pencil leads to create intricate and delicate sculptures of animals.  Using a rather common medium to create an uncommon result, Chau’s work touches on the value of storytelling and myth and their ability to connect us to one another.

Industrial designer Irving Harper creates beautiful paper sculptures.  Humble materials for such intricate results, Harper is interested in using brilliant design and craftsmanship to integrate the natural world.

Read More >

Currently Trending