An Entire Kitchen Meticulous Covered In Colorful Yarn Knitting… Even The Food

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

This past year at Warwick Art Gallery in Queensland, Australia featured  a cozy site-specific installation called the Knitchen. As the name suggests, it was a kitchen adorned with knitting (some referred to it as a yarn-bombing). Yarn-covered chairs, sinks, coffee cups, and even a turkey occupied the space from July until August. This endeavor was the result of 50 artists working over the course of seven months. And, it shows. Nearly everything – from a phone cord to the label on a jam jar – is the result of a meticulous attention to detail.

Karina Devine, the Warwick’s gallery director told ABC Southern Queensland that the installation was inspired by an old-fashioned kitchen (hence the phone). “I got a new oven last year, and kept my old oven so I could wrap my oven,” Devine said. “The most exciting part for me was creating the crocheted gas flame, and hand sewing the orange flecks.That gives me a little bit of a kick every time I see it.” (Via Lustik and ABC Southern Queensland)

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Rescued Lab Rodents Take Part In An Enchanting “Alice in Wonderland” Photoshoot

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Italian charity La Collina dei Conigli ONLUS rescues rabbits, mice, rats, and guinea pigs from labs or mistreatment. The now-adoptable pets were the recent subjects of a photo series by Rachele Totaro that’s inspired by Lewis Carroll’s famous novel Alice in Wonderland. Volunteer Attilia Conti had the idea, and it commemorates the first 10 years of the charity’s operation. So, why Alice in Wonderland? Because the book and organization both started with a white rabbit.

The fantastical photographs feature the animals holding objects, poking out of a teapot, and of course, gazing into the looking glass. “Mice were the most cooperative models, while guinea pigs were the laziest (they stayed still only with food present),” Totaro writes. “Rats were the most attractive, and rabbits… were the most disapproving.” You can see that with some of the critters, there was no coercing them into any sort of cutesy pose.

The charity’s rescue center is located in Monza, near Milan, and many of the animals are still looking for new homes. If you’re local to the city, you can adopt one. (Via Bored Panda)

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Alex Cornell Captures The Strange, Rare Sight Of A Flipped Iceberg

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Icebergs, while massive in size, are usually seen in one way – as white objects that stick out of the frigid water. But, in rare situations, they take on a different, more brilliant form. When an iceberg is flipped over, it appears as a gem that cloaks itself in the color of the surrounding water.  Interface designer Alex Cornell happened upon this phenomenon last month as he sailed through the Drake Passage to Antarctica.  He was able to shoot pictures of the iceberg using his Canon 5D Mark II camera.

“We were lucky to see a massive iceberg flip; when this happens, the color is a surreal, alien blue,” he tells PetaPixel. “They don’t flip often, so it was a pretty rare sight to see. It’s hard to tell scale, but this was an epic iceberg.”

It’s often said that 90% of the iceberg itself is below the surface, and this is the cause of it being topsy-turvy. “It was amazing to see the interior. There were air bubbles and flowing water throughout. It looked like an alien artifact.” (Via 123 Inspiration and PetaPixel)

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Phil Ferguson Crochets Delectable Foods To Wear On Your Head

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It’s no secret that Melbourne-based artist Phil Ferguson is fond of food. After all, giant slices of crocheted pizza, cracked eggs, bacon, hot dogs, and much more are strapped onto the top or side of his head. They take the form of decorative hats and costumes that frame the wearer’s face, and their larger-than-life scale makes them a delight. Ferguson posts as @chiliphilly on Instagram where he has 14.2K fans (at the time of writing).

The artist is originally from Perth in Western Australia, and he started crocheting the food and sharing on Instagram as a way to connect with other artists in the area. It all began with a burger that was inspired by Tuck Shop Take Away, his place of work. “From that point onward I thought about how to do food hats,” he told Daily Mail. “[Food] has been the most accessible thing people can relate to and it will stay that way until I’m bored.

Depending on the design, Ferguson is able to complete a piece in two to three days. The artist describes himself as a self-taught crocheter (he watched instructional YouTube videos) who has never learnt to read patterns. Even so, he’s crafted 24 delectable creations so far. (Via Daily Mail and Milk Made)

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Crystal Wagner’s Paper Sculptures Explore The Realm Between Familiar And Strange

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Encased in white-framed boxes are Crystal Wagner’s intricate cut paper sculptures. Like specimens meant for studying, parts of textured tentacles and honeycomb-esque patterns wrap around themselves as well as non-representational wavy shapes. Wagner’s work is meticulous, and each scalloped edge has its own slightly-curled edge. It’s reminiscent of a dragon or a reptile, but not one that we’ve ever seen before. The vibrant colors feature jewel-toned gradients that push her sculptures from quasi-reality into full-blown fantasy.

These works first made their appearance at the Hashimoto Contemporary gallery in San Francisco in 2014. Her exhibition was titled Synesthesia, and the intention was to explore the psychological realm between the familiar and strange. The gallery writes, “…combining screen printing, cut paper and various dollar store items, Wagner meticulously assembles her sculptures with a sense of organic growth. Allowing her materials to build upon themselves, layer by layer, each structure swells into a mass of movement, as if grown from the soil of another planet.”

If you’re a fan of Wagner’s work, check out her large-scale, site specific installations.

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Klaus Pinchler’s Macro Photos Of Dust Transform Your Mess Into Beautiful Images

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Pet Shop

Pet Shop

Police Station

Police Station

Tailor

Tailor

When photographer Klaus Pichler was moving out of his old apartment in Vienna, he noticed something peculiar about the dust on the floor. In the living room, dust bunnies were red while the mitesin his bedroom were light blue. This led to something of an epiphany for Pichler, and he realized that dust isn’t always gray like we so often see – there are varieties. Inspired by that experience, the photographer started a years-long series that chronicles the accumulation of different dust particles. Aptly titled Dust, it recently culminated into a book of the same name.

Pinchler’s dust gathering was similar to collecting specimens to study. He retrieved them with tweezers, placed each in their own Petri dish, numbered,  and inventoried them. Photographing the dust proved trickier, and it required Pinchler renting an expensive 120mm macro lense and capturing them all within 24 hours. They were left unaltered and their tiny, exquisite beauty shines in these up-close images.

From police stations to subway stations and pet stores, each gathering of dust has its own idiosyncrasies. The pet shop, for instance, has tiny, brightly-colored feathers and wood chips for the animals. There’s less hair in it than the police station, which has threads, metal, and leaves swirling around in a matted ball.

Dust was published by Anzenberger Edition. It’s available for purchase on Pinchler’s website or through Anzenberger Gallery Bookshop. (Via Slate)

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Sebastian Errazuriz’s Contagious Yawns Fill Billboards In Time Square

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If you’re local to, or find yourself in New York City during January, head to Times Square to witness artist Sebastian Errazuriz’s site-specific installation. Titled A Pause in the City that Never Sleeps, it’s a black-and-white video featuring the artist slowly yawning multiple times throughout its 11:57PM to midnight timeslot. There isn’t any fancy editing or motion graphics in Errazuriz’s video – it’s just him that dominates approximately 50 electronic billboards that are central to the city’s hustle and bustle.

If you’ve ever visited Times Square, or even just seen pictures of it, you know that it’s a crowded frenzy nearly all times of day. There are hoards of people, bright lights, colors, and jumbo-sized advertisements that are on a continuous loop. Errazuriz’s moment-of-zen video stands in stark contrast to what we’re normally used to seeing. It’s unhurried, hypnotic, and contagious. Visitors might feel the urge to yawn after watching it.

About the project, Errazuiz says, “I hope that the video can offer a brief moment of pause that can remind us of our urgent necessity for free space and time that can allow us to recover a stronger sense of awareness. (…) I am yawning at everything and all of us; we need to wake up.”

Find A Pause in the City that Never Sleeps from 42nd to 47th streets between Broadway and 7th Avenue until January 31. (Via designboom)

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This Plastic Skeleton Lives The Life Of “Basic” Girls On Instagram

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From the sounds of it, Skellie is your average girl. She loves Starbucks, takes full advantage of open bars, and goes on shopping sprees. Skellie chronicles her life on an Instagram account, where she’s known as @omgliterallydead. The caveat, though, is that Skellie is a skeleton – a fake one that you’d normally see around Halloween.

This project started as an inside joke between co-workers, and Dana Herlihey, a social media manager, is the brainchild behind Skellie and her antics. “In early October, a pose-able, plastic skeleton arrived at our office,” she told Buzzfeed. “My coworkers took to it; someone taped a Starbucks cup to the skeleton’s hand and I took a photo for my personal Instagram. (This was at the height of the Pumpkin Spice Latte craze.)”

Herlihey thought that it’d be funny for the skeleton to have its own Instagram account, and she realized the potential for contemporary satire. Skellie plays the part of a “basic” person who gets super excited over the most average things – Fridays, sushi, and snow are just a few. Each photo adds another definition of the term.

Herlihey has a lot of dedication to Skellie. When you see the skeleton at the coffee shop, at the dentist office, and at a bar, that means that Herlihey took her with her. “Some people love it, laugh, ask to take a photo, or make a witty pun as they pass by,” she explains to Buzzfeed.. “Others will pretend there is no skeleton sitting beside me or give me frequent disapproving side glances.” (Via Bored Panda and Buzzfeed)

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