Henrik Franklin’s Book Sculptures Are Small Enough To Fit Between Two Fingers

Henrik_Franklin_hand_12_2x Henrik_Franklin_tablefront_13_2x Henrik_Franklin_two_piles_2x Henrik_Franklin_ifyoutoleratethis-doku-6oktIMG_4903_1_1_2x

Galleries come in all sizes, even in a really, really tiny scale. Swedish graphic designer and illustrator Henrik Franklin has created an installation that’s something you’d be more likely to see in a dollhouse than anywhere else. But, instead of a bedroom, it’s located at the Odenplan underground station at Gallery 1:10 in Stockholm, Sweden. The group exhibition is titled If You Tolerate This – an exhibition about resistance. Franklin’s piece features a library of colorful books, all small enough that you can hold between two fingers.

In a show centered around worries of the future and the holding on to hope, Franklin’s tiny books represent how important literature is in our development. It teaches us the lessons of the past so we won’t be doomed to repeat them; prose also encourages and inspires us to dream and to think differently.

If You Tolerate This – an exhibition about resistance is on view until December 6.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Hollywood Contact Sheets Reveal The Moments Between Scenes Of Iconic Films

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Rear WIndow, Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

1980-Raging_Bull_2-De-Niro

Raging Bull, Christine Loss

Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant

Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant

© Sid Avery/mptvimages.com

Giant,© Sid Avery/mptvimages.com

In the newly-published book titled Hollywood Frame by Frame, author Karina Longworth examines the contact sheet, a necessity in film making before the advent of digital technology. The prints were used by photographer as a way to review and edit their work, and the sheets contain small thumbnails of multiple shots. They were marked, scribbled on, carefully examined to find the perfect shot later used in advertising.

These sheets are alluring; not for how interesting and different each individual frame is, but it’s a tiny glimpse into what went on behind the scenes in famous films. You’re able to see what was and wasn’t chosen, as well as the outtakes. A description for Hollywood Frame by Frame describes it as, “…it’s often the photos not chosen that best capture the true spirit of their subjects and the life they lead after the director yells cut. This was never truer than in the classic Hollywood era, where behind-the-scenes photos were carefully vetted for marketing purposes and unapproved shots were never expected to be seen again.

Some of the films included in the book are: Some Like It Hot, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Taxi Driver, and Silence of the Lambs. It was published by Princeton Architectural Press.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Vintage Ceramics Cleverly Covered With Dozens Of Tiny Ants

laphilie4 laphilie2 laphilie3 laphilie9From far away, you might not realize what’s on these porcelain pieces by Evelyn Bracklow for LA philia. But, upon closer inspection, you’ll notice that there are tiny painted ants that look like they’re travelling across plates, cups, saucers, and more. The German artist has permanently implanted this pest onto the very places that we don’t want them to be.

Despite someone’s potential aversion to the ants, these pieces are clever, unique, and beautifully crafted. The playful works are handmade in her studio, signed, numbered, and fired between 160 and 180 degrees. Glossy, gold rimmed, and vintage, the addition of these critters marrs the glossy white porcelain. But, that seems to be the point. Bracklow wants them to be unusual and catch the eyes of passer by, and she certainly does it. While some designs only feature the ants, other pieces have food on the plate and the ants hovering around it. Sounds appetizing, huh?

The pieces featuring food are part of a partnership between Bracklow, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy.

Currently Trending

Gray Malin’s Portraits Of Rainbow Colored Sheep Inspire Us To Dream

graymalin1graymalin7 graymalin6

graymalin4

Photographer Gray Malin (@graymalin) takes us on a journey in his colorful, idyllic series titled Dreams. The sun-soaked images feature a herd of sheep whose coats are decorated with pink, purple, yellow, blue, and green pigment. Malin had the idea years before he actually made the work; he was inspired by a story about a Scottish sheep farmer who had colored the fleece of his flock in order to deter the thieves who had been stealing his sheep at night.

This powerful visual stuck with him for seven years. “I dreamed of creating a series where I could give these often overlooked animals a way to shine, bringing a rainbow of color to help inspire others to stand out and follow their own dreams.”

Malin consulted with a team of experts and eventually travelled to rural Australia where he worked hand-in-hand with a family of third-generation sheep farmers to make this series a reality. “Utilizing a non-toxic, vegetable dye that rinses off with water, the farmers misted each sheep with the same tool they use to administer a spray for ticks and lice,” he says.

Sheep yearn to be apart of a crowd; they prefer to blend in rather than stand out. So, each of Malin’s images are meant to encourage others to “wander from the flock” and go after their desires.

Currently Trending

Elana Adler Painstakingly Embroiders Mens Catcalls To Her

ElanaAdler1ElanaAdler4 ElanaAdler8
ElanaAdler5

Brooklyn-based artist Elana Adler uses the traditional craft of an embroidery sampler to outline the crude things said to her by street harassers. The series is titled You Are My Duchess, and features small, decorative pieces of needlework (which historically feature bible stories or other imagery) that say some negative, disgusting things. Adler stores each saying in an elaborate frame, and writes in her artist statement:

This series of thirty-two (plus) samplers is intended to be provocative and evoke emotion. It is a contemporary feminist interpretation of women’s work and an objectification of my personal experience. Each captures a moment, giving these words a visual presence, a power, and a state of concreteness. These words were hurled casually and heard quickly but required hours of time-consuming, careful stitching.
The physically delicate, traditionally feminine, form of the piece engages the viewer and confronts him/ her with a sweetness that may mask its crassness and vulgarity.

She goes on to explain that the strength of this series comes in numbers. While you might read one and be amused, the more you read will change your response.

The inherent filth emerges. It is a beautification of an assault. Perhaps in the moment these statements are meant to compliment, but most don’t find vulgar, highly sexualized statements whispered or screamed at them by random strangers complimentary. Rather, they are an invasion of personal space. (Via Got a Girl Crush)

Currently Trending

Vittorio Ciccarelli’s Minimal Photos Reveal Beauty In What’s Normally Overlooked

vittorio1 vittorio2 vittorio4 vittorio12

Vittorio Ciccarelli’s photographic series titled Invisible captures parts of the world that we pass by - what we look at, but don’t really see. The artist highlights fast food chain signs, lamp posts, factory windows, and more in these simplified and beautifully-designed images. Ciccarelli’s works feature vibrant blues, reds, and yellow hues, and it’s clear that he caught these places on a good day.

By zeroing in on just a couple of sets of windows or a portions of a sign, he creates abstract compositions. We now focus on the formal aspects of the work rather than where or what the image is of. Sure, we might recognize that the two lights are the top of a lamp post, but that seems secondary to the gorgeous shapes and how they interact with the cloudless blue sky. When you look at these places just so, as Ciccarelli has done, you see how peculiar the seemingly “invisible” things in the world really are.

Currently Trending

Lia Melia’s Swirling And Turbulent Paintings Of The Forceful Ocean

Lia-Melia5Lia-Melia3

Lia-Melia2 Lia-Melia6

Artist Lia Melia grew up a few minutes walk away from the sea, and today it is still her main source of inspiration. And, you can definitely tell – her colorful, swirling paintings are reminiscent of the large body of water. Mythology has also been a life-long love of hers, and she depicts elemental forces that are represented by the gods.

Melia uses a variety of methods to create these highly-textured works, and she’s developed her practice over the course of many years. Powered pigments and solvents are baked into aluminium, or occasionally, onto glass. She uses fluid mixes which require high levels of control, so they are often thickened to make the medium easier to use. Different elements are layered to give them a rich, visual depth.

Looking closely at these paintings, we see that her skill in creating textures give the illusion of crashing waves, stormy skies, and ocean foam. Melia’s tightly-cropped compositions freeze a split second in time, and anyone who has stood in the water can imagine what happens beyond this scene. (Via Saatchi Art Tumblr)

Currently Trending

Joel Parés’ Powerful Series Examines What Happens When You Judge A Book By Its Cover

judging-america-joel-pares1 judging-america-joel-pares11 judging-america-joel-pares2 judging-america-joel-pares4

Joel Parés is a U.S. Marine-turned-photographer who’s created a series titled Judging America that illustrates the prejudices we often have against people who are different from ourselves. As the old saying goes, “don’t judge a book by its cover,” and that’s what you’re liable to when you first see these stylized photographs.

Each image is broken up into the two parts – a stereotype of a particular societal group versus who the character actually is. The tattooed, gun-toting gangster turns out to be a Harvard graduate, a decorated stripper is a buttoned-up widowed mother of three kids, and more. You get the picture here – Parés is demonstrating that talented, incredible people come in all different packages.

“Many of us judge incorrectly by someone’s ethnicity, by their profession, and by their sexual interest,” Parés told PetaPixel. “The purpose of this series is to open our eyes and make us think twice before judging someone, because we all judge even if we try not to.” (Via Bored Panda)

Currently Trending