Davit Yukhanyan’s Bizarre Illustrations Made Up Of Countless Tiny Drawings

"And When You Lose Control"

“And When You Lose Control”

"And When You Lose Control" detail

“And When You Lose Control” detail

"Isolated Winner"

“Isolated Winner”

"Isolated Winner" detail

“Isolated Winner” detail

Davit Yukhanyan is an Armenian architect and illustrator whose incredible works have an stunning amount of detail. Each large and complex drawing contains hundreds of tiny drawings within its dimensions, and a central shaded figure occupies the center with outlined figures behind it. However, shading isn’t necessarily made using just your traditional pen techniques. Instead, animals, people, and objects fit together like pieces of a puzzle and change in scale. The smaller they are, the more dense the drawing which alters how dark it appears to the viewer.

Considering just how intricate Yukhanyan’s work is – with pieces measuring about 27 inches by 39 inches – it’s no surprise that he’s only produced two so far. Titled And When You Lose Control and Isolated Winner, the massive artworks are inspired by the world we live in. “Just as everything in our world consists of different pieces, my drawing also consists of different pieces in the form of small illustrations that come together into one overall creation,” he writes on  Bored Panda. “I draw the artwork with this concept in mind.” (Via Demilked and Bored Panda)

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Sit Haiiro’s High Energy Drawings Punctuated By Glitches

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Sit Haiiro is an artist from the Netherlands whose monochromatic illustrations are slightly askew. The portraits of young kids and animals have a serious tone to them, and they’re obscured by slight planal shifts, digital elements, and mysterious clouds. There’s little context to Haiiro’s works, with his subjects devoid of background or environment. This gives an eerie and off-putting feeling to the hand-crafted images, and it’s as if they are out of a dream.

Haiiro’s characters are very active and full of energy. Dogs are running at full speed, a crow is in the midst of flight, and a child jumps as high as he can. But, every action is punctuated and falls short. Pixelation and thin lines fracture faces, bodies, and enthusiasm. There’s an obvious visual sparring between the two, and Haiiro describes it as, “where the calm surroundings provide more opportunity for decision making, rather than being driven by the fast moving winds of change.” (Via Inspiration Feed)

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Zemer Peled’s Beautiful Blooms Are Made Up Of Countless Shards Of Porcelain

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Israeli artist Zemer Peled creates sculptures using countless ceramic shards. Each individual element is a small part of a greater whole, and their sharp and pointed edges form a single beautiful form that’s inspired by flowers or sea creatures. Through careful arrangement, these forms bloom and breath like the real thing.

Peled uses blue cobalt found in designs and landscapes from traditional Japanese pottery as her raw materials. Subtle lines and patterns create the textures for flower petals and other attributes. To make this possible, the artist uses a slab roller to build sheets of clay that are fired and then broken with a hammer. What’s incredible is not only the meticulous nature of assembling and placing each piece, but its the uniformity that they all have. Although Peled’s work is comprised of countless parts, each of them is the same. (Via Colossal)

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Yuri Suzuki’s Tiny Robot Orchestra Turns Drawings Into Music

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For Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki, dyslexia prevented him reading music in the traditional sense. But that didn’t stop him playing it. Instead, he adopted a playful approach and created an installation that invites viewers to produce their own music using color markers. Visitors draw along the curvy lines on the floor, and then the robots translate their marks into one-of-a-kind sound pieces.

The robots are called Color Chasers, and they associate each color that they find on their path with a sound. This small, unique orchestra features five different machines that each have their own sound and shape. The Basscar has a Dubstep-like sound, the Glitchcar reproduces computer-like sounds, and the Melodycar, Arpeggiocar, and the Drumcar to add rhythm.

This imaginative work was recently selected by the New York MoMA for their collection. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

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Sarah Brockett’s “Bold Bakery” Imparts Sassy Sentiments on Sweet Treats

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If you want to say something, say it on a cake. People have come out via frosting, and now graphic designer Sarah Brockett created the Bold Bakery project as a way to impart some sassy sayings onto sweet treats. Curse words abound, they are on full display on cakes, cookies, and in the filling of a pie. The juxtaposition between the beautifully-crafted baked goods and their harsh sentiments make this series amusing. It might make you hungry, too. Brockett explains the thinking behind her bakery:

Though it’s branding may make it appear cute and friendly, the Bold Bakery is not where you want to purchase Grandma’s birthday cake from. It is, however, the perfect place to have a pie created for your cheating husband, or your bratty pre-teen daughter. This establishment simply oozes with sarcasm and sass. Don’t have anyone on your “shit list”? That’s okay. Plenty of our customers partake in “cake wars”, where they gift their friends with raunchy baked goods for no reason at all. Sometimes a little crude humor and chocolate cake is all you need to get by in life. (Via iGNANT)

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Dina Goldstein’s “Gods of Suburbia” Places Religious Figures Among Modern Society

Buddha

Buddha

Lakshmi

Lakshmi

Last Supper

Last Supper

Satan

Satan

Photographer and pop surrealist Dina Goldstein’s large-scale project titled Gods of Suburbia features a collection of deities and religious figures set within the context of modernity. Buddha, Mohammed, Satan, and others exist alongside technology, science, and secularism as it relates to living in the (anywhere) suburbs. Goldstein explains:

The series plays with narrative and religious iconography in order to communicate how organized belief has become twisted within a global framework driven by consumerism and greed.  The project challenges the viewer — religious or secular — to embark on a journey of self-reflection as they contemplate the relevance of dogma in modernity.

Goldstein’s moody images highlight some less-than-stellar facets of our modern culture. Lack of compassion, unwillingness to learn/accept other beliefs, and bullying are just some of the themes that the photographer touches on. The series, while strange, is poignant and relatable as we read more and more bad news everyday.

Each photo in Gods of Suburbia features thoughtful and interesting explanations of how every figure relates to contemporary society. Read it on Goldstein’s website.

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San Pierre’s Intricate Threaded Designs Over Photographs Distort Reality

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UK-based artist San Pierre has a slightly unorthodox method when creating his work. Instead of displaying a simple image in a frame, he draws designs over top of the print with threads that are secured with nuts and bolts. These intricate, criss-crossing strings form delicate shapes that alter how the viewer interprets the image. Depending on the depth and color of the strings, the artwork might appear diffused or distorted with geometric fragments.

Pierre’s use of thread adds not only a physical layer onto his work, but a conceptual one as well. His piece titled Discontent No. 6 (top two images) features a dark figure who looks as though they’re trying to gingerly find their way. With the technicolor strings, however, it now reads as a barrier or a wall. Instead of freedom, this being is trapped. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Virginia Mori’s Dark, Surreal Illustrations Of Headless Women

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Italian illustrator Virginia Mori uses black ballpoint pen and pencil on paper to create strange, lady-centric compositions. The minimal drawings feature long-haired women in surreal situations. Heads are often seen severed or parts of the body are fused with furniture. Although they are weird, Mori’s work isn’t gruesome. Even when a umbrella handle is coming out of a character’s mouth, there’s no blood or guts. It’s simply a surreal scene.

Mori separates mind from body, in both literal and figurative ways. Heads are rolling, they exist on different levels, and are obstructed by hair. It represents the idea that we can “disconnect” our mental from our physical self, and that this separation can feel like two entities. But in Mori’s illustrations, what causes it? Mystics? Physical ailments? Lessons not learned? The sparse compositions allow for multiple interpretations.

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