Stefan Zsaitsits’ Surreal Drawings Conjure Childhood Nightmares

stefan-12 stefan-10 stefan-3 stefan-1

Austrian artist Stefan Zsaitsits draws portraits in pencil that are simultaneously nostalgic and strange. The alluring images often feature surreal moments that are from a child’s point of view and a deranged mash-up of characters, places, and frantic mark-making.

There are small comforts in Zsaitsit’s work, like the warm-toned graphite coupled with moments that highlight the joys of growing up. Some characters play with toys and imagine pleasant, beautiful things. Other times, Zsaitsits depicts children and their nightmares. Dark combinations of desolate scenes are ravaged by scary animals and enemies.

Through visual layering of these characters, the artist indicates that many of these images are seen in the mind’s eye. In the drawings, they’re contained within the body or its direct gaze. Zsaitsits’ symbolic works are a darker, more modern-day version of a child’s Boogie Man, and ripe for interpretation by the viewer. (Via Faith is Torment)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Hannalie Taute’s Embroiders Beautifully Fractured Portraits Stitched On Car Tires

hanna-1 hanna-7 hanna-5 hanna-3

Using discarded inner tubes and a needle and thread, South African artist Hannalie Taute embroiders portraits onto rubber. She takes cuts the abandoned material and cuts them apart to stitch together and form a “canvas.” Often, this means that her subjects have a subtle honeycomb pattern as their backdrop. “Besides the durability and availability of rubber from inner tubes found in car tires, I also decided to embroider on rubber because I find the contrast of working with needle and thread on these inner tubes fascinating,” she says in an artist statement.

As you might imagine, rubber is a tough surface to embroider on. Every stitched line is shown, and Taute isn’t able to seamlessly blend together the different hues. The results are fractured areas of color that abstract her portraits, although not to the point of unrecognition. And, this is partially the idea – to subvert materials. The rubber’s coarse texture is offset by the delicate thread, but at the same time the thread can seem rough with its choppy arrangement.

The artist’s inspiration comes from a number of places, but boil down to identity. She writes:

Titles, words, phrases from books, music, stories, sayings and toys play an integral part in conveying meaning and biographical info about me as a mother, wife and artist in society.  Relationships between people and objects are something I prefer to explore using my chosen medium.

Taute’s work is currently on display at the Erdmann Contemporary Gallery in Capetown. Entitled Cross My Heart, it’s on view from now until March 30 of this year. (Via Jung Katz)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Corinne Vionnet Combines Boring Vacation Photos Into One Ethereal, Ghostly Image

Corinne Vionnet2 series "Photo Opportunities" series "Photo Opportunities" series "Photo Opportunities"

When searching for photos of popular tourist destinations, chances are many of these images look the same. Thanks to the now-ubiquitous camera phone, anyone can snap a photo anywhere. So, of course, it’s no surprise that there’s an endless amount of dull images of places like Los Angeles’ “Hollywood” sign or Rome’s Colosseum. Artist Corinne Vionnet recognized this fact years ago and crafted artworks born from banal vacation  photos. Her series is titled Photo Opportunities, and it uses at least 100 found photos layered digitally to comprise one cohesive image.

In 2005, Vionnet began searching online for pictures of tourist landmarks around the world, and she observed that most snapshots were of the existing, “stereotypical” imagery of that locale. Vantage points, lighting, visual symmetry – it all looks the same.

Photo Opportunities was recently on view at the Danziger Gallery in New York. They describe Vionnet’s pieces, writing:

Working with multiple images of different monuments, she collates around a hundred appropriated photographs for each of her layered, ethereal compositions. Underneath these beautiful ghost visions is a serious concern with how the persistence of formally repeated photographic compositions affects our cultural and historical awareness.

The Impressionist-quality of these images comment on how we experience and reflect on our environment. Even though the photo feels unique to the picture taker, it is all-too-similar and later lost in the digital ether. (Via Gawker)

Currently Trending

Jess de Wahls Uses Recycled Fabric In Colorful Portraits Of Inspirational Women

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo (detail)

Dr. Ronx

Dr. Ronx

Jess de Wahls is a London-based artist whose colorful multilayered and multifaceted textile works incorporate feminism, gender equality as well as recycling. Using a variety of fabrics, beads, and other materials, she creates 3D portraits that depict strong, inspirational women of all ages, shapes, and ethnicities. She sees her pieces as a way to raise awareness of gender inequality, explaining to TextileArtist.org, “…all the while celebrating great minds and artists of the past and present.

In her artist statement, de Wahls also goes on to say:

Their influence on myself as a modern woman, Feminist and Artist, on Feminism as a whole and on their position as Role models to young girls growing up in a society that has, no doubt, come a long way in liberating its women but has yet a great length ahead of it. Not to mention the work that needs to be done in other parts of our planet, where women are to date still oppressed, belittled and generally treated as second class humans.

So, by creating these pieces, she ensures that their legacy isn’t forgotten.

De Wahls unique style is the product of a self-made called Retex which is short for recycled textile sculpture. She explains:

For the medium of Retex Sculpting, old garments serve as fabric for the works and cushion filler  helps me to create a relief that raises the silhouette off the canvas creating greater depth.
The box-frame, in which the work is mounted, is integral to the piece and can be seen as a modern day relic box. (Via TextileArtist.org)

Currently Trending

Life Magazine Gives Us A Look Back At The Fashionable Teenagers Of The 1960′s

"Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear 'hippie' fashions, 1969."

“Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear ‘hippie’ fashions, 1969.”

"Southern California high school students, 1969."

“Southern California high school students, 1969.”

"High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969."

“High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969.”

"High school fashions, 1969."

“High school fashions, 1969.”

In fashion, what goes around comes around. What was stylish 20, 30, even more than 40 years ago can still make a comeback and look en vogue. LIFE magazine documented the 1969 trends of American youth culture, and many traces of them are still worn today.

Hippies and disco culture shaped the way people dressed themselves, and these fashions were considered “counter culture” at the time. Fringed vests, bell-bottom jeans, and miniskirts were part of the new trends and attitude towards expressing yourself through clothing. “The latest rule in girls’ high school fashion,” LIFE magazine wrote in 1969, “is that there isn’t any.”

While the same could be said today, these sartorial choices came from a much different place. The world was seeing a cultural transformation and just getting smaller with the growth of global telecommunication networks. The television become a thing in every household. Liv Combe of LIFE also explains, “The vast and near-visionary national highway system had spread across the country in the post-World War II years; more households than ever owned a car (or two); and for the first time, plane travel was becoming a viable option for many American families.

Denim jumpers, Peter Pan collars, and strappy sandals are all things popular back then which are still seen today. They might’ve seemed strange back then, but as with most things, counter culture eventually goes mainstream. With some of these photos, it might take you a moment to realize they aren’t from 2015. (Via Demilked and Time)

Currently Trending

Genius Online Handwriting Service Uses Robots To Mimic Your Penmanship

bond-2intro-bg bond-1

You might write a ton of emails, but how many letters do you sit down to write? The kind that require pen, paper, and often a stamp and envelope. Probably not many. If you hate the task but need an extra-special note, then the company Bond will help you out. It’s an intelligent scribing system that mimics human handwriting. Thanks to automated robots with ink pens, they’re able to write notes and send them to the person of your choice. A pen is attached to a machine that applies weight to the paper as if it’s a human hand.

Bond has a few pricing tiers for their product. If you’re looking for a generic, all-around “handwritten” feel, then you’re not too concerned with it appearing as your actual penmanship. For that, the service is free (with additional costs like the card). But, let’s say you want to send a note that’s to a relative or someone who has an idea of what your scrawls look like. That’s where the cost goes up. Services that are tailored to your penmanship start at $199. Paying $499 will give on an hour of time to work alongside Bond’s experts to refine your handwriting. (Via Laughing Squid and Ubergizmo)

Currently Trending

Josephine Cardin’s Haunting Photos Depict An Emotional Lock And Key

cardin-3 cardin-5 cardin-9 cardin-7

New York-based photographer Josephine Cardin’s poignant images examine the beauty of the human body as well as the complexity of the mind and emotions. Cardin’s series, featuring self-portraits, is titled Between Lock and Key . It explores “the dichotomy of how we have both the ability to mentally imprison ourselves, while simultaneously holding the key to unlocking our freedom,” she writes. Muted, vintage-esque compositions showcase her donning a long, black dress in elegant poses (she’s a trained ballet dancer). Cardin is surrounded by expressive, distressed marks and multiple hands that read as both soothing and troubling.

The marks that surround Cardin’s body are visual representations of the mental blocks that we all face from time to time. Thoughts clouded with anxiety prevent us from moving forward with life and seeing things clearly. Cardin draws scribbled clouds around her head and crosses out her eyes using short, energetic strokes.

While there’s a lot of visual strife in Cardin’s series, there’s hope, too. The same lines that hold her down lift her up. It’s as if she’s overcoming adversity and doubt to rise to her true potential. (Via Asylum Art)

Currently Trending

Sarah Bahbah Combines Takeout Food And Sex In Her Voyeuristic Photo Series

Sarah_Bahbah_6 Sarah_Bahbah_7 Sarah_Bahbah_4 Sarah_Bahbah_2

For Australian photographer Sarah Bahbah, food and sex are intimately tied. Her series is called Sex and Takeout, and it’s exactly what it sounds. There’s nudity and canoodling, all with a greasy side of fries. Or pizza. Or, even Chinese takeout. Bahbah runs the gamut of meals while posting it on her Instagram, @raisebywolvesau.

Subjects are seen sharing meals, eating it while laying in bed, or looking post-coital with their food. And sometimes, takeout boxes are pushed to the side as people get down to business. It’s indulgent, visceral, and at times a little silly. But, above all, Sex and Takeout is strangely satisfying for the viewer/voyeur of these private moments. Food and sex conjure the same pleased feelings and pleasurable experiences, so it’s only natural that the two would be enjoyed in the company of one another. (Via Flavorwire and Design You Trust)

Currently Trending