Tobias Hutzler’s Creates Sculptural ‘Objects’ With Live Human Bodies

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Tobias Hutzler, a photographer / director based in New York City, creates photographs that showcase sculpture-like forms outlined by live human bodies. The unusual portraits, (because I have no idea of what else to call them) feature men and women in skin toned underwear, posing on top, near, and next to each other in strange, and involved poses.

It is interesting to note that Hutzler instructs his subjects to pose in intricate positions with in each other on top of a stand (one that would usually hold a sculpture in a museum/gallery space). This detail further assures the viewer that he/she is indeed witnessing a sculpture of some sort. Hutzler is also interested in portraying ‘different shades of color’, meaning that he includes people of varied skin tonalities, and I assume, different nationalities as well.

Hutzler creates these large-scale photographs by using a unique technical approach, resulting in images that are printed as they are shot, without manipulation. Photographing with small-scale digital sensors, Hutzler achieves a distinctive digital noise quality, allowing for the characteristics of raw digital technique to have a powerful effect on the final photograph.

“This photographic approach builds tension between the large-scale scenes and the digital noise and fragments, resulting in an aesthetic beauty of its own, contrary to aiming for higher resolutions and dynamic range. My photography is searching for a truth between the aesthetic of the medium and the subject matter of the image.”

(via Inhale Mag)

Hutzler creates his large-scale photographs with a unique technical approach, resulting in images that are printed as they are shot, without manipulation or compositing. Photographing with small-scale digital sensors, Hutzler achieves a distinctive digital noise quality, allowing for the characteristics of raw digital technique to have a powerful effect on the final photograph. “This photographic approach builds tension between the large-scale scenes and the digital noise and fragments, resulting in an aesthetic beauty of its own, contrary to aiming for higher resolutions and dynamic ranges,” says Hutzler. “My photography is searching for a truth between the aesthetic of the medium and the subject matter of the image.” (via art daily)

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Andrew Lyman’s photographs Of Ghostlike Figures Captures The Transcendence Of Memory

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Andrew Lyman, an artist and photographer living and working in Savannah, Georgia, creates “Fleeted Happenings”, a series in which the artist explores “the transcendence of memory through time in relation to space.”

These photographs envision the ephemerality of the body. Especially the reality of it being able to be in a state of being and becoming, of transcendence and disappearing. The photos feature ghostlike silhouettes that appear in scenic landscapes and surroundings that evoke feelings of nostalgia, but also of the sublime. The vast, endless, and empty spaces, not only seem beautiful because of its brilliant hues, but they also evoke fear, and anxiety, as these still remain unknown. Similarly, the transparent silhouettes suggest more of the same feelings. We are enthralled by their beauty and mysteriousness, yet, as we look at them, we acknowledge the possibility our body existing as a non-tangible, transparent form. Consequently, this brings forth questions of life after death, life before existence, and the reality of past memory an non-tangible ‘object’. As we look at these transparent, other-worldly, yet familiar forms, we have no other choice but to think about how one re-imagines memory; specifically how we envision a memory and its existence in a certain space at a given time in the past. (Via Feather of Me)

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Celebrity Mashups: Do celebrities Get More Identical With The Passing Decades?

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George Chamoun, a Swedish jewelry design student at the Konstfack University of the Arts, creates Iconatomy, a project that critically looks at celebrities, fashion icons, political, religious, and other personalities that influenced the confines of beauty today. The artist perfectly arranges the new and the old fragments of celebrity faces, so that upon a quick glance, viewers might think they are looking at just one subject. Each compilation features two faces representing the past and the present of glamour and fame.

Chamoun’s collection of mash-ups are striking in that we barely find differences between these timeless icons. I think this makes up for a strange, but obvious conclusion: we still look for perfect, youthful faces… standards of beauty have remained the same throughout all of these years. In fact, it has stayed so much the same that celebrities now resemble the ones before their time.

Apart from making this statement, I think we can’t deny that there is also an eagerness to resemble times in which beauty was a bit more natural than what it is today. Celebrities, stylist, hair dresser, etc have the urgency to emulate classic beauty. However, they are trying so hard that they all back on unnatural ways to make that happen.

Similarly, Marc Ghali, Canada-based photographer, also works within this framework.

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Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

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Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

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Santa Invades Classic Works Of Art In Ed Wheeler’s Photographs

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The Birth of Venus, Inspired by: Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus – 1486

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The Dream, Inspired by: Henri Rousseau, The Dream – 1910

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Golconda, Inspired by: René Magritte, Golconda – 1953

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Death of General Wolfe, Inspired by: Benjamin West, Death of General Wolfe – 1770

Ed Wheeler, a photographer, superimposes himself on famous paintings while dressed in a Santa costume.These hysterical renditions are inspired by Ed’s long time traditions of dressing as Santa for holiday cards he created for fun. For years, Wheeler would send out photographs of himself as Santa doing strange and comical things to clients around the holiday.

Inspiration stuck with him, and, according to Wheeler’s website, in 2011 Wheeler stood in front of Emanuel Leutze’s famous painting of George Washington at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it was then that it occurred to him: Santa needed to invade canonical works of art!

That is just what he did.

As you can see in these photos, Santa (Wheeler) has made appearances in many famous paintings. He appeared in his long underwear as Venus de Milo in Botticelli’s most iconic painting, and has also posed as a pensive, and a very spirited Santa, over Claude Monet’s Water Lillies. Through Wheeler, Santa has ridden Napoleon’s horse, sipped a cup of coffee in a 1940s diner, played poker with dogs, and floated in a flock of businessmen into the stratosphere in these humorous interpretations of some of art’s most iconic works.

These have become a hit; the Philadelphia Museum of Art is now selling Wheeler’s Santa Classics in their official gift shop for $12.95 a set. You can get them here. (Via Fast CoDesign)

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Phillip Toledano Photographs Of Extreme Plastic Surgery (NSFW)

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In Phillip Toledano’s new book, A New Kind of Beauty, you will find photographs of those whom have gone through extreme cosmetic surgery. The images are quite shocking, but there is also something quite unusual about them; you can see, through the sitters’ victorious stances, that they actually feel quite powerful and actually beautiful.

‘A New Kind of Beauty’ possesses an interesting aesthetic. The photographer decides to portray his subjects, not under a glamorous light, but instead in way which exudes an air of strength and power. Although the artist says that he is referencing 16th century artist Hans Holbein (which he is) I say that he is also reflecting an aesthetic that very clearly references that of Greek and Roman sculpture. I find it compelling that Toledano’s juxtaposes something so contemporary as cosmetic surgery, to something so dated. But, his line of thought makes sense.

We all know that the Greek and Romans were obsessed with beauty, perfection and youth. They found beauty in perfect young bodies, hence the many grand sculptures of young naked bodies (usually men). Their stance, for the most part, was stoic; emotion made the beauty fade away…their stance was always upright, a symbol of power and honor. Similarly, the photographer renders his sitters in poses that clearly show off their wannabe young bodies and faces (some are covered by draped robes and veils, yet another detail that references this particular stylistic period). They stand tall and emotionless, even if their highly transformed faces say otherwise. Their ‘beauty’ is fake, but it is theirs, and they are owning it.

In a way, Toledano is documenting contemporary human beauty as well as ‘admiring beauty’ in the same way the Greeks and Roman did in their time.

“We will be able to redefine what it means to look human, and I think these people are the vanguard of that type of evolution.”

However, it differs in that this kind of beauty is manufactured and maybe not so beautiful after all.  The photographer wants to make sure we realize that this is our society’s standards of beauty. Whether it is actually beautiful or not, real or not, well that’s not something to fret about. It is an obvious fact that the public is eager for perfection, youth, and hypersexualized physical attributes, so here’s the outcome of the pressures to be just that.

“I wanted to make beautiful and distinguished portraits of these people. … I wanted to represent a particular part of beauty from our time. It will be very interesting to see in a few years time how I compare physically to these projected images.”

The book A New Kind of Beauty is available for purchase. (via Fast Codesign)

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Roseline de Thélin’s Brilliant Holographic Light Sculptures Shimmer With Ghostly Figures

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Roseline de Thélin, a Spanish artist, creates stunning, larger-than-life holographic light sculptures and installations. Her projects feature what she calls, “Homos Luminosos,” or luminous beings. Using scientific properties of light such as reflection, conduction, refraction and transparency, Roseline creates these transparent, mystical bodies that look like they are hovering in mid-air. These fantastical works are inspired by astronomy, quantum physics, definitions of perception, and other-worldly-creatures.

Thélin uses a wide range of materials including mirrors, wires, chains, fiber optics and quartz crystals in her work. She combines the use of digital technology and exhibition space, as she works on producing these mystical beings by creating illusion and deception effects withing specific sites. The empty spaces between the light points serve to create a loose definition of what real space is. Are we looking at something that truly exists? Or is it just as illusion? Furthermore, is the visibility of the illusion a justification for its existence in the tangible world?

Her latest holographic sculptures, presented in FREQUENCY 2011, the Lincoln Festival of Digital Culture at the Saint Swithin Church in Lincoln, England, are a reflection on life, illusion and the evolution of mankind. This series features a series of these ‘light beings’ that exist in a parallel, timeless dimension.

(via Feather of Me)

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You Won’t Believe What This Street Artist Did To Those Hilarious Realtor Bus Bench Ads We All Laugh At

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I have a deep respect for anyone who is willing to put their face on a bus stop bench knowing what people do to them. I thought it would be fun to do my own take on our local realtor advertisements.

We are all very familiar with the ridiculous realtor portraits on the bus benches, right? Well, freelance designer and creative director Phil Jones gives them an even more ridiculous spin.

As you can see on the images, Jones is eager to channel his inner realtor as he inserts himself into these local realtors’ advertisements. He goes deep into character by imitating the realtors’ poses, clothing choices, and even their hair and make-up! It is obvious that Jones wants to look as fake as possible; I think that this is part of the plan. There is no way that someone could pass by and not notice the wigs, the weird poses, and the overall awkwardness…or is there?

Although there isn’t much similarity between the mock and the real thing, it is still possible that many of the onlookers didn’t even notice the difference. Jones looks as ridiculous as the realtors do in the original, so it might of just passed as normal.

It all goes to make us question if these absurd ads make any impact at all. Do we expect these ads to always be this bizarre and comedic?

Now, I’m not even sure which one is funnier. (via)

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