Alex. S. Maclean’s Aerial Photographs Of American Leisure Spots

alex_maclean_beautiful_decay_01 alex_maclean_beautiful_decay_02 alex_maclean_beautiful_decay_03 alex_maclean_beautiful_decay_04

Boston based pilot and photographer Alex S. MacLean captures aerial images of playgrounds, parks, and other American leisure spots. The simple shots expose an interesting variety of colorful compositions that gather an almost abstract and often painterly representation of modern urban planning. His compositions are often unintentionally metaphorical and insightful, as their lively presence unofficially represent the types of things that these landscapes stand for: beautiful, fun, and often pleasurable places to be in and to look at.

“It really is about combining art and information. Some of it is sort of subliminal – you can’t quite put your finger on it but it sort of draws you in and engages you.”

(via FastCo Design and It’s Nice That)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Sara Landeta Drawings Of Birds Juxtaposes The Natural World With Prescription Medication Packaging

saralandeta-02saralandeta-07saralandeta-06saralandeta-05

Madrid-based artist Sara Landeta juxtaposes the natural world with the chemically engineered by using medicine boxes as her canvas to creates beautiful ornithological drawings inspired by the work of 19th-century artist John James Audubon.

By using the bird as her prime subject, the artist looks to explore the idea of freedom, or lack there of, in constricted and open spaces, and the notions of a natural world that is dependent on the synthetic to survive.

The progress on Landenta’s ongoing series can be seen through her Facebook page or on her personal blog. (via Steal Mag)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Maja Daniels Photographs The Surreal Resemblance Of Identical Twins

Maja_Daniels_beautiful_decay_01 Maja_Daniels_beautiful_decay_02 Maja_Daniels_beautiful_decay_03

Maja_Daniels_beautiful_decay_08

Maja Daniels, a Swedish photographer based in London, compiled the series “Monette & Mady”, a photo collection of identical twin sisters, Monette and Mady.

Daniels approached the identical twins in 2010 after years of watching them from afar in the streets of Paris. The photographer was intrigued by their way of being and coexisting with each other. Neither Mady nor Monette have married or had children, they always eat the same kind of food in identical portions, they dress the same, and they move in similar ways. If they ever go out dressed in different outfits, people stop and ask why they argue- there is no room to be different from each other.

With the beauty of the Parisian sidewalks as her backdrop,Daniels shoots photos of the twins’ interactions and eerie resemblance. Some may look at the collection as a classy lookbook, others may find that there is something quite peculiar and surreal about their ways with each other. Many will wonder about the mysterious bonds between twin siblings.

This addition of fiction makes for a dreamy atmosphere, a bit like a mirage that reflects my initial impression of them. The streets of Paris make the perfect backdrop for such ambiguity to be played out, confusing us with its references to fashion, film and art. It makes the documenting of everyday events somewhat surreal.

 

Read More >

Currently Trending

Eilon Paz Photos Of Massive Record Collections

elion_paz_beautiful_decay_06elion_paz_beautiful_decay_01 elion_paz_beautiful_decay_02 elion_paz_beautiful_decay_03

Iranian photographer, Eilon Paz takes photographs of over 130 vinyl connoisseurs and their collections in the most intimate of environments, their record store rooms. Paz, a record collector himself, thought it might might be interesting to explore the people around him whose record collections are both larger and weirder than his own.The stunning, candid photos look at a variety of well-known vinyl champions as well as a glimpse into the collections of world-renowned and lesser-known DJs, producers, record dealers, and everyday enthusiasts.

In a 416-page coffee-table book, Dust and Grooves, Paz’s photographs are grouped together with compelling essays that closely examine the records and the people whom collect them. The book is divided into two main parts: the first features 250 full-page photos framed by captions and quotes, while the second consists of 12 full-length interviews that look deeper into the collectors’ personal histories and vinyl stories.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Tonya Corkey Creates Portraits Out Of Lint

tonyacorkey1

Canadian artist Tonya Corkey creates portraits made out of lint on canvas. Through her choice of material and subject, the artist looks to investigate an unavoidable aspect of human nature- precisely, the the need to collect memories and reconstruct the past. The series, “See You In the Future,” looks to further analyze this desire to recollect objects and moments of the past through a medium that encompasses the essence of loss and decay over time.

My work hybridizes the discarded material of lint with the second hand image – the iconic school photograph – to conceptualize my interests. Materiality conceptually layers the work. As a byproduct of society, lint consists of fibers, hair, dead skin and other debris, and thus directly referencing people and their daily activity. Lint and cast off photographs are both discarded materials – materials that reflect the idea of a decaying memory. Our desire for memory in absence is triggered by sensations of smell and touch, a trait of my work.

(via The Jealous Curator)

Read More >

Currently Trending

García de Marina Rearranges Mundane Objects Into Witty Compositions

garcia_marina_15

With a witty sense of humor and an inventive mind, Spanish artist García de Marina, creates photographs based on the reinvention of mundane items. How about reworking a couple of spoons for sunglasses, or a slim comb for a bar code ? No wonder Spanish poet José Luis Argüelles once referred to him as the “photographer who knows how to capture things we aren’t able to see.”

Marina’s compositions come to have this nostalgic feel, not only because maybe the objects he is using are reminiscent of our own lives, but mostly because perhaps, at some point in our lives, we’ve all come to re-imagine that which is around us. There is more than just a clever re-interpretation of objects here. If we look closely, the artist is proving his viewers with alternative observations, perhaps, an ultimate surprising escape to the mundanity of our world.

They are very simple images. I try to create images that are easy to understand-and that hopefully don’t need any kind of explanations. I want to make an impact, give my viewers a little surprise. I hope that they will inquire more, and do further examinations.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Henrique Oliveira’s Architectural Sculptures Harmoniously Merge Natural And Artificial Components

Henrique Oliveira

Henrique Oliveira

Henrique_Oliveira_beautiful_decay_02.jpgHenrique_Oliveira_beautiful_decay_01.jpg

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira creates monumental, site-specific installations that confront the viewer with oddly formed, but organic looking sculptures. Oliveira’s way of shaping and installing the material against the gallery wall make it seem like an ever-changing parasitic growth upon a manufactured, man-made landscape. The objects’ swirls, knots and root-like quality allude to both natural and artificial substances.

The artist’s way of merging varied materials, amongst them recycled wood and decayed debris from the Sao Paolo streets, suggest that the artist is interested in manipulating both indoor and outside space to finally create a harmonious coexistence between urban design, plant life, and biology. (via Design Boom)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Kerry Skarbakka’s Photographs Of Himself Falling From Trees, Bridges, And Off Cliffs

Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_01.jpg Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_02.jpg Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_03.jpg

Artist Kerry Skarbakka creates Struggle to Right Oneself, a series of photographs that capture the artist himself in moments of suspended threat: falling from trees, tumbling head over heels in painfully precarious falls, or teetering on the edge of a fateful leap from a railway bridge. The images may be comical yet unavoidably painful to watch. According to Skarbakka, the idea of the fall comes from Martin Heidegger’s description of human existence as a process of perpetual falling. What are we without our falls and broken bones? The photographer captures a loss of control, that inevitable moment, prior to a fall, when one feels uncertain and scared, unable to know what happens next.

I continually return to questions regarding the nature of control and its effects on this perceived responsibility, since beyond the basic laws that govern and maintain our equilibrium, we live in a world that constantly tests our stability in various other forms. It is my understanding and my perspective, which relies on the shifting human conditions of the world that we inhabit. It’s exploration resides in the sublime metaphorical space from where balance has been disrupted to the definitive point of no return. It asks the question of what it means to resist the struggle, to simply let go. Or what are the consequences of holding on?

Skarbakka utilizes special climbing gear and other rigging to achieve each shot, the final images, however, are truly convincing. (via Colossal)

Read More >

Currently Trending