Get Social:

Sarah Illenberger’s Strange Fruit Transformations

Defining one category for all the work of Sarah Illenberger is no easy task. What initially sounds quite abstract, in reality, is mostly practical in that her creations are not generated on a computer but rather by meticulous handwork, sometimes incorporating the most mundane materials.Out of her studio in Berlin, Germany Illenberger takes everyday fruits and vegetables that we find in grocery stores and transforms them into humorous sculptures that look like other mundane objects that one may find in their home. The results will make you laugh and think of a disco next time you see a pineapple in aisle 6.  (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Stefan Strumbel

Picture 3

Black Forest, German native Stefan Strumbel is another urban fine artist represented by the Circleculture Gallery of Berlin. Strumbel reinterprets embedded regional folk classics of his personal past: the cuckoo clock, the pre-lentan Alemannic Carnival mask… familiar objects of home transformed with pop-culture flair, bright colors and iconic substitutions; a confrontation to cultural cliches. Strumbel’s work will be on exhibit in October as part of Escape 2010: Escape the Golden Cage, International Exhibition of Urban Art, Austria.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Get Lost In Markus Linnenbrink’s Hypnotic Rainbow Installations

Markus Linnenbrink- Painting Markus Linnenbrink- Painting Markus Linnenbrink- Painting Markus Linnenbrink- Painting

New York-based German artist Markus Linnenbrink has created an enchanting installation which envelops visitors in a disorienting colorful pattern. Although not exactly in a ROYGBIV formation, this rainbow room, made of bold hues of acrylic paint covered in epoxy on resin, creates a unique experience for viewers. The piece above is named “WASSERSCHEIDE(DESIREALLPUTTOGETHER)” and is currently up in Germany at the art center Kunsthalle Nuernberg until October 12th.

Linnenbrink has worked within this use of line work and colors for much of his artistic career. While some of his shows have featured conventional paint on canvas work, he often utilizes the space to its maximum effect. Linnenbrink composes a piece of art one walks into, is a part of, and can see from all vantage points. One really intriguing work of his, shown below, features colored line paintings hung on walls that are doused in lines of grey and black.

The artist toys with color and boundaries of separation. The colors bleed into one another, drip lines form from gravity, and each layer is pulled into subsequent layers. Despite the rigidity of the lined patterns, there is always this aspect of chaos and an unwillingness to be contained. Boundary breaking, inside of the canvas and outside of it, stretching his vision across whatever parameters may be set architecturally. The dramatized effect of this work becomes atmospheric; how one relates to the space then changes, as the lines and contours of walls are abstracted, nearly dissolved, through the blanket of pattern. The piece is primarily dictated by the space it is shown in, but ultimately the space is taken over by the artwork, creating an interested and entirely unique interaction between the two within each and every installation.

Currently Trending

Yayoi DEKI Color Explosion

Japanese artist Yayoi Deki’s paintings and sculptures take you on a cartoon psychedelic voyage where everyone’s having an intense acid trip all at once forever for the rest of our lives.

Currently Trending

Kimberly Clark’s Severed Head

Artist collective Kimberly Clark present the hedonistic but also deeply disturbing image of an exaggerated nightlife, on the borderline of excess. Scenes from parties, static images or movements in suspension and representations of blissfulness, provocation, glamour, desolation, boredom, stimulation, the concentrated remains of a nightlong euphoria jumbled together with cosmetics (empty Marlboro packets, bottles and cans of beer, lipstick, etc), compose a kind of group portrait (or self-portrait?) with explicit signs of psychological fluctuation. At the centre is always the female figure, trendy attractive, narcissistic and, at the same time, a live-size simulacrum, juxtaposing stereotypes of the female identity with shocking views of the night and mounds of consumer rubbish.-Thanos Stathopoulos

Currently Trending

Jeffrey Meyer

Jeffrey Meyer

Collage / illustration work from Jeffrey Meyer. What do you expect some someone who’s URL is “goofbutton”? Awesome.

Currently Trending

Sarah Moli Newton Applebaum

applebaum_1

Sarah Moli Newton Applebaum (what a name!) creates meta-knitted sculptural installations that emphasize an overwhelming array color patterns using mostly knitted fabric and blankets. These bursting animated forms engulf and transform a space into a heavenly spectrum and in their geometric abstraction suggest a homey environment that you would only find in happy induced dreams. The costumes are inventive, creating imaginative and quirky characters that seem innocent enough to cuddle with but with a guarded stance that can be quite intimidating.

Currently Trending

Performance Artist Tiffany Trenda Challenges Our Ideas Of Touch, Intimacy And Proximity

Tiffany Trenda - performance Tiffany Trenda - performance  Tiffany Trenda - performance

Tiffany Trenda is a performance artist on a mission to awaken us from a technological slumber. Wearing a synthetic suit imbedded with forty small 2.6 inch LED cell phone screens, she asks people to interact with her, touching and pressing the monitors all over her body. Citing fellow performance artist Valie Export Tap and Touch Cinema as an inspiration, she examines our ease and familiarity with having devices, gadgets, screens and monitors all around us, in her new work Proximity Cinema.

The word ‘touch’ has a completely different meaning for today. Originally ‘touch’ meant human-to-human contact. Now we think of our smart phone, iPad or tablet. So, today, touch refers to human-to-screen contact. (Source)

Confronting people to enter her personal space, and destroying normal social limits, she highlights the boundaries between man and machine; natural and digital, and how willing humans are to accept the influence technology has over us. Trenda not only looks at how we use technology, but also how we understand our own identities through technology.

In her body of work she becomes the digitized version of the human body and her actions replicate those of a computer. Trenda creates a platform for questioning the boundary of where the digital impression and the physical body begin and end. The viewer is physically and visually immersed in the process of how the psyche evolves to relate to the screen (LCD, television, cinema or a computer). (Source)

Trenda’s installations and performances are a fresh and very real look at how easy it is to be overwhelmed and overpowered by technology. She reminds us to reflect on how integrated technology is becoming – it is not far from becoming part of our very skin. Perhaps her futuristic bondage-looking outfit will soon be a part of our wardrobes?

Currently Trending