Get Social:

Noah Conopask Dramatic Cinematic Eye

Noah Conopask‘s photography is dark, intriguing, and looks like stills from a dramatic movie. Every once in awhile you get a nice break from the darkness and into the light. Check out his blog here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Anna Meredith’s Nautilus Triumphs with a Unique Sound not unlike Björk

British composer Anna Meredith just released her debut, Black Prince Fury EP on limited edition vinyl from the Vinyl Factory/Moshi Moshi in the UK. It’s limited to only 300, so if you want one, you better act fast. You can stream the full version of Nautilus and check out the animated video via Noisey, directed by Tony Comely. 


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Mike Lythgoe

I absolutely love the stuff illustrator and designer Mike Lythgoe is making; it’s lavish and dreamy and somehow clean and meticulous at the same time.

Currently Trending

Luis Dourado’s Departure series

Luis Dourado‘s Departure series’ digital manipulation of photography contorts and distorts geography to explore the power of imagination. The photographs of Spanish and Portugese mountains are regarded as departures away from civilisation, as the once formidable are changed into beautiful geometric patterning by Douardo’s imaginative capability. More after the jump.

Currently Trending

Donna J. Wan’s Haunting Photos Of Suicide Destinations

wan-photo5

wan-photo1

wan-photo2

wan-photo3

Photographer Donna J. Wan’s ongoing series “Death Wooed Us” is gorgeous, unsettling, and deeply empathetic. “In 2011 after the birth of my daughter I developed a severe case of postpartum depression and considered taking my own life,” she writes in the description of the work, all photos taken in “suicide destinations”—places where people have taken their lives.

“Using research gathered from media reports, I found several locations in the Bay Area and travelled to them. I walked along the paths taken by these people before they ended their lives. Most of these photographs were taken from bridges, including the Golden Gate Bridge, one of the most well-known ‘suicide destinations,’ but also lesser-known beaches and overlooks. I purposely photographed from the perspective of looking up at the sky, down at the water or crags, or straight ahead but far away, thinking that these views might have resembled the ones seen by others moments before dying. Many of my images have a hazy and elusive quality, which I believe reflects the clouded state of mind of the suicidal.”

Suicide is such a sensitive subject. There are many people—probably the majority of people—who cannot imagine losing the will to live. Whether because of religious beliefs, or ties to family and friends, or just the innate need to stay alive, these people believe that they would never end their own lives. Then there are others, who have lived with pain and grief and the loss of hope. Those who, because of sickness of body or brain, struggle through every day. Once you have crossed this line, between life at all costs and death as a merciful end, the world never looks the same to you again. In Wan’s series, her experience is what makes the photos haunting and peaceful. She has looked into the cracks of her own soul, and that has enabled her to walk in the footsteps of those without hope and capture their last sights with kindness. The last view of a suicidal person could be macabre, an intrusion into someone else’s pain. These photos offer beauty, the acknowledgement of despair, and the desire for peace.

“There are some who may think that my photographs romanticize these places of death. I can understand that point of view, although that is not my intention. Death is not beautiful – in fact, jumping from a bridge 200 feet high is a very painful and violent way to die. Yet the sublimity of these places continues to lure people to them. I do not intend for my work to glorify the allure of these places. Instead, I hope that it may offer a glimpse into the minds of those who may have thought that dying by these beautiful places was a peaceful way to end their suffering.”

(via feature shoot)

Currently Trending

Martin Roller Constructs Clever Mash-Ups Of Everyday Objects Found In The Streets

Martin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found ObjectsMartin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found ObjectsMartin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found Objects

German artist Martin Roller constructs assemblages of objects in hilarious and astonishing ways in his body of work. Taking found object from the streets of Berlin, he photographs interesting mash-ups of everyday objects and remnants of trash, transforming their original function. Setting the scene similar to commercial photography, each newly created object looks as if it is on display in an ad, waiting to be bought. Who knows, maybe Roller’s banana shoes will be the next big thing, although they are not exactly wearable. This colorful and clever series is both aesthetically appealing, with its perfect color blocking, and intriguing, as each item is not altered digitally.

At first glance, you may think that Roller’s images are digitally spliced photographs that together create the finished product. Although this would take some skill, each object is more impressively built by the artist’s own hand, and therefore, actually exists in real life. Roller explains that we live in an age where technology has given us endless possibilities that are accessible to a vast majority of people. Because these digital alterations, as well hand-cut collages, are so common today, these techniques are of no interest to him. He instead aims to assemble his own “collage” from a more realistic source, the objects themselves.  Each image displays an amazing combination of real life objects, with an eye on modern design.

Currently Trending

Architectural Photography That Looks Like Futuristic Viruses

Cory Stevens photography4 Cory Stevens photography2

Cory Stevens photography8

Munich, Germany based Cory Stevens shoots architectural photography in a peculiar way.  He abstracts the architecture by photographing a segment of a building and reflecting it in various ways.  In some photos the reflection is duplicated, and in others its repeated many times as if in a kaleidoscope.  All of the reflections merge seamlessly, though, as if it were one floating structure.  The strange symmetry gives the buildings an almost organic quality as if it were about to divide and multiply on its own.  In a way, they resemble viruses made of steel, cement, and glass.

Currently Trending

Red Poppies Flood Like Blood From The Tower Of London Commemorating WWI Centenary

Paul-Cummins-Installation-Sculpture-1 Paul-Cummins-Installation-Sculpture-2 Paul-Cummins-Installation-Sculpture-3 Paul-Cummins-Installation-Sculpture-4

Ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper collaborate to create a stunning installation commemorating the centennial of the First World War. A scarlet sea of 888,246 ceramic red poppies will be “planted” around the Tower of London. Titled “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red”, the installation pays tribute to soldiers who perished during the war.

For the past few weeks, volunteers have been carefully placing the flowers all around the famous dry moat around the Tower. Poppies burst through one of the windows and then flow loosely, forming an arch over the footbridge to the castle. Each poppy represents a soldier from the United Kingdom and its colonies who was killed during WWI. Cummings says he was inspired by a line in the will of a soldier from Derbyshire.

“I don’t know his name or where he was buried or anything about him. But this line he wrote, when everyone he knew was dead and everywhere around him was covered in blood, jumped out at me: ‘The blood-swept lands and seas of red, where angels fear to tread.’ I believe he meant the angels to refer to his children.”

Poppy is considered a flower of remembrance in Britain. The reason is because most of the soldiers died fighting in the trenches in the poppy fields of Flanders.

The blooming field will continue to grow throughout the summer. The final flower will be symbolically planted on November 11th, Armistice Day. The ceramic blossoms are for sale for £25 ($42) each. 10 percent of the proceeds go to benefit six different charities. You can find out more about the project by following the #TowerPoppies hashtag on Twitter. (via Colossal)

Currently Trending