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David Miller’s Fashion Animals

A great mixture of fashion and animal images by Phoenix based photographer David Miller.

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Nathan Mabry

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Nathan Mabry’s work makes me laugh out loud like when I was still a wee little tot. This LA based artist is clearly doing his best to represent for the west coast, in the tradition of Ken Price, John Baldessari, and Robert Arneson.

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Photographer Kyle Cook

kyle cook hanna_smokeKyle Cook describes himself as “a whimsical boy of magical nature.”  His photographs seem to mostly feature his friends and lovers (even down to showcasing a dirty stain on his boxers.)  I like the youthful nature of his work.

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Robert Melee’s Hyperspectrum Rays

Robert Melee sculpture

Robert Melee creates striking sculptures that combine the figure, psychedelic color palette, and goofy everyday additions (like the socks above).

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Kenya Hara’s Architecture For Dogs

If you think your dog sweaters or home cooked dog food doesn’t quite express the extravagant love you have for your dog, you might want to take a note from Kenya Hara designing and building a house specific to their size and aesthetics. Hara is a japanese art director, designer, and architect who commissioned eleven architects from around the world to design tiny structures based on the personalities of individual dogs. I love these. Partially because it’s reminiscent of the fact that humans effectively designed all these dog breeds themselves, but mostly because it is always fun to see dogs’ complete disinterest to things people have spent huge amounts of time designing for them, like presenting newborn babies with the socks you crocheted for their feet–just having no idea what caring even is, much less to care about whatever this thing on or around you. Yet the elegant maze does seem Papillon-esque and the geometric dome like a neurotic pug.  Tons more day-makers after the jump. (via)

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Photographs Of Sudan’s Indigenous Dinka Group

This seminal volume on the indigenous African Dinka group is a landmark documentation of a vanishing people in war-torn Sudan. World-renowned photographers Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith have devoted their lives to documenting the rapidly disappearing ceremonies and cultures of the indigenous people of Africa. In breathtakingly poignant images, they present a story that started with their first visit to the Dinka thirty years ago. Living in harmony with their cattle, the Dinka have survived years of war only to find their culture on the brink of vanishing forever. Where the White Nile River reaches Dinka country, it spills over 11,000 square miles of flood plain to form the Sudd, the largest swamp in the world. In the dry season, it provides abundant pasture for cattle, and this is where the Dinka set up their camps. The men dust their bodies and faces with gray ash—protection against flies and lethal malarial mosquitoes, but also considered a mark of beauty. Covered with this ash and up to 7’ 6″ tall, the Dinka were referred to as “gentle” or “ghostly” giants by the early explorers. The Dinka call themselves “jieng” and “mony-jang,” which means “men of men.”

Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith have spent a lifetime studying the peoples of the Horn of Africa, and have published their photography in a series of acclaimed books as well as major magazine features in Time, Life, Vogue, Marie Claire, and Elle. They exhibit and lecture widely at prestigious venues such as the American Museum of Natural History, The Smithsonian Institution, and the Royal Geographical Society in London.

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New work from Alex Lukas and Matt Leines

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New stuff on view by Alex Lukas and Matt Leines @ Sf’s Guerrero Gallery, opening tonight!!!!!!

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Fishmerman Corey Arnold Gets Up Close And Personal With Wildlife

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For 3 months of the year, Corey Arnold is a commercial fisherman. For the rest of the time he travels around Portland, Oregon and the surrounding areas photographing the wildlife in a very sincere and earnest way. Beginning his life at sea, he first worked as a deckhand on a crabbing vessel in Alaska in 1997, and from then started documenting his experiences in an on-going series called Fish-Work. In it, Arnold captures the lifestyle of the commercial fishing world, filled with images of men in neon colored rain jackets, bundles of ropes, dead bait, enormous waves, monstrous fish and hoards of birds.

In his new series though, he has concentrated just on animals and their personalities. The exhibition Wildlife is as unpretentious as it sounds. Arnold has been able to become quite intimate with his subjects, capturing bears, birds, seals, sharks, and moose all in a relaxed, natural state. Spliced with images, once again, from the fishing world, we get a good idea of how seamlessly Arnold fits into his environment. It seems the animals caught on camera don’t notice the presence of this human one bit. The artist reflects on his obsession with the wilderness and also his ability to go unnoticed within it:

I harbored a deep desire to be an animal living in nature and I didn’t have far to travel. The lush gully in my backyard, just out of sight beyond a thicket of poison oak, was home to coyotes, raccoons, possums, stray pets, snakes, lizards, rats and crawdads. Any bustling in the bushes was a potential mystery to unravel or a prey to stalk. I was a particularly curious child, an amateur wildlife tracker, behaviorist and hunter who often pressed the boundaries of human/wild animal proximity. (Source) (Via Super Sonic)

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