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Jonathan Haggard

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I was tipped off by electroniccottage about Jonathan Haggard. He is a great graphic designer and illustrator with a defined style. I appreciate his poster’s strange facts, honesty, and humor, check him out!

 

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Roxy Radulescu’s Breakdown Of Color In Film Stills

Roxy Radulescu lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. In addition to her many graphic design projects she is currently working on a series entitled Movies In Color in which she sheds light on the color composition found within single frames of famous films. Not only does deconstructing frames from a film like 2001: A Space Odyssey help to reveal a gorgeous color spectrum, it also highlights the masterful Cinematographer responsible for framing and shooting the picture. In her own words it is ” …a pursuit that showcases the relationship between color, cinematography, set design, and production design. Overall, it is a study of color in films, but has other uses and applications. One of the goals is to give artists color palettes they can use in paintings, films, videos, graphic design, and other pursuits. I search for stills that are compositionally interesting as well as rich in color. I use the help of a color generator to get a very basic range of swatches. Then I piece together the general palette from that and other colors I think are prominent or worth including from the still.”

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Robbie Rowlands’ Sculptures Cut Up Pianos, Walls, And More

Robbie Rowland - Sculpture

Robbie Rowland - Sculpture

 

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Robbie Rowland - Sculpture

Using repetitious and precise cuts, artist Robbie Rowlands manipulates objects and environments. They are monumental manipulations and demand your attention the moment you see them.  He installs his work in abandoned homes, school yards, and gymnasiums,using elements from the space to create his sculptures. Doing so gives the place or object a mind of its own. The walls breathe and the floor is alive.

Writer Simon Cooper wrote about the work in an essay that accompanied Rowlands’ Disintegration exhibition in 2008. Despite the time passed, I find that his analysis is still apt for the artist’s current body of work. Cooper writes:

Rowlands bases his sculptural work on things that exist at the fringes of our awareness, utilitarian objects such as lampposts or desks. He refashions them into something altogether different yet in a way that never allows their original identity to be shed. The mass produced and functional designs are softened and framed in terms of a new aesthetic, giving the object a renewed energy or sensibility. The effect is to reveal hidden potential in what had come to be regarded as outmoded. If the former object is largely unrecognizable in the new sculpture, the process is not one of violence, rather there is a sense of redemption, as if the object has been liberated from obsolescence, from forgetfulness.

Rowlands repurposing gives us the opportunity to remember the thing or place, but place it in an entirely new context. Sometimes, the way something is cut and later posed feels like a cartoon. Take, for instance, the basketball hoop that has been cut. Seeing this hoop laying on the ground, like a turtle on it’s back, is simultaneously comical and sad. We’re reminded that while it has no practical use anymore, it didn’t before it was manipulated. Rowlands has saved it from total obscurity.

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Byoungho Kim’s ‘Progression of Silence’ Engages Sight and Sound

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Byoungho Kim‘s The Progression of Silence engages sight and sound, using an aesthetically and aurally pleasing repetition of bells. A site-specific installation, Kim constructed the massive work from brass, piezo, signal wire and a sound controller, to hang in the spiral stair case of the Johnnie Walker House, an arts exhibition space opened in 2013 buy the famous whisky distiller. The piece hangs from the roof of the building down to the floor, engaging the entirety of the architecture, and with sound, the people inside the building. Says Kim, “One of the “materials” I like to use is sound. The essence of sound is the vibrations of frequency, and these vibrations are often seen as geometric patterns to the eye. Through the process of changing these geometric patterns, namely modulation, they become sounds for the artworks.”

Kim fully explains his process, “My work is an approach toward the rationality that was spontaneously generated with the progression of civilization such as systems, standards and modules. The unitized and systemized material/immaterial elements become the material of my work. The output created from my materials poses questions on the essence of life as well as being a study on human nature.” (via myampgoesto11)

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Carlos Cruz Diez’ Ultra-Colorful Light Installations

 

Carlos Cruz Diez‘ choice medium in his installation Chromosaturation is simply color.  While we’re accustomed to seeing many different colors constantly and simultaneously, Diez uses only three colors presented one at a time as a departure point: red, green, and blue.  Diez saturates a room with one of these single primary colors of light.  The color floods from room to room, interacting with other colors, creating entirely new hues.  The light immerses the gallery space so thoroughly that the color almost takes on a physical aspect.  In his statement, Diez says:

“The Chromosaturation can act as a trigger, activating in the viewer the notion of color as a material or physical situation, going into space without the aid of any form or even without any support, regardless of cultural beliefs.”

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Ria Brodell

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Self-Portrait as Freddie Mercury, circa 1985

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Self Portrait as Miami Vice Dude

Artist Ria Brodell aspired to don Freddy Mercury’s tight white jeans and signature ‘stache, and the Miami Vice Dude’s cool calypso-linen pantsuit rather than play princess or tea party. What I love most about her achingly sincere self-portraits posing as dubious icons of masculinity is the tangled web of complications it weaves. What does it mean for a queer woman to paint herself in goache as Carey Grant, a gay man playing a straight man in sexuality-restricted 1950’s Hollywood? Hmm….what do you guys think? Any of you boys rather play with Barbie than GI Joe’s?

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The Film-Like Photography of Tajette O’Halloran

The photographic work of Tajette O’Halloran is narrative rich.  Each image seems stolen from a story in progress.  The photographs borrow filmic qualities not only in its storytelling  but style lighting and composition.  Indeed, O’Halloran had spent time as a location scout for Australia’s film industry.  She’s kept her eye for location and sense of drama.  The self-portrait series featured here is set in an abandoned house in Barre, Massachusetts.

O’Halloran relates of the experience, “While staying here in this environment I felt compelled to create a photographic story of captivity, abandonment and surrender. I wanted to explore the fragility, torment and eventual freedom of the mind  when left alone with yourself and your thoughts.”

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Ballet And Geometric Patterns, And A New Sound Collide In This Awe-Inspiring Music Video

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A performance combining digital lines, monochromatic backgrounds and two individuals. The collaboration for ‘Sparks’ music video, between composer/producer Ralf Hildenbeutel and filmmaker Boris Seewald has created a dynamic choreography shrewdly synchronized with the music, a track from the composer’s new album, ‘Moods’.

The geometric motifs are shaped in lines, cubes, circles and appear sporadically while the two women dancers perform. The electro/classical sound is giving the tempo to the intertwined duo and extremely thin traced patterns. At some point, a hidden shape is moving under a black matte outstretched piece of fabric. The choreography is enhancing the voluptuous ballet moves of both dancers. They appear in order. Black, white and then together. The opposition of colors symbolized by the two dancers is unsettled by the lines, triangles and circles.

The music is leading the game. The staccato tempo in the beginning goes along the fast forwarded gestures of the first dancer. Possibly a few milli-seconds ahead of the choreography; the music is giving us the impression that our intuition is predicting the appearance of the geometric lines and the acceleration of the movements.
Taken apart, the 3 concepts (music, patterns and performance) wouldn’t have made any sense. Put together, they create a perfect synergy. (via The Creators Project)

Ralf Hildenbeutel’s new album ‘Moods’ is available for purchase. 

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