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Theo Jemison & Kiel Johnson

 

While Kiel Johnson constructed an entire magnified twin lens camera out of cardboard (which actually works, amazingly but not surprisingly), Theo Jemison artfully captured the endeavor on another medium, film. It’s more than just a time-lapse video, it’s beautiful and captures the fun and tediousness that was involved in making this gigantor camera. Click here to see photographs the camera actually took! They’re eerie and gorgeous, just in time for Halloween.

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Video Watch: What’s Your Wild Rabbit

 

The Good folks at  Hennessy bring you a three part mini documentary featuring Elliott Wilson, Founder of Rap Radar and Editor-in-Chief of Respect. In this first video Wilson heads to the barbershop where, he explains, the voice of the street is heard. The man with endless talking points reminds us that, “your opinion is nothing unless you can back it up.”   Join Wilson and Hennessy on a trip down the rabbit hole and watch more Hennessy videos with some of the worlds leading pop culture creatives at neverstopneversettle.com.

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Mark Benson’s Flu Shot Art

Reservations are now being accepted for limited edition flu shots; each shot comes with corresponding certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

-That phrase is taken from the press release for Get the Flu, Mark Benson‘s current exhibition at Ever Gold Gallery in San Francisco. A registered nurse was on site during the opening to administer real flu shots as part of a symbolic gesture to accompany the show, which focuses on themes surrounding the human need for control. It’s too hot?- turn on the air conditioner. Don’t want to get sick?- here, have a flu shot. Benson’s ability to present his commentary in such a unique, but direct way is really impressive.

Find some images from Get the Flu (on view til the 27th), below. And if you’re hankering for a further dose from the artist, you can still pick up a copy of Beautiful/Decay Book 7 right here which features a spread by him.

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Beautiful Parasites- The The Morbid Reality Of Being Human Illustrated In Tammy Salzl’s Watercolors

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Psychologically dark and a bit grotesque, the watercolors of Montreal based artist Tammy Salzl are meant to be like beautiful parasites. She wants the images of scared children, fragile adults or lonely humans to disturb viewers at first, then slowly over time, delight them with their unique beauty. These emotional studies have evolved from Salzl’s earlier work where she placed the disturbed characters based on Grimm fairy tales in lush, busy backgrounds. Wanting to isolate the figure to exaggerate their state of mind, she has cleared the background and focused on the complexities of skin and the different emotions it can express.

I want the flesh I paint to make a connection between the material of paint and the material of the body, to reflect not only a psychological makeup but to suggest an ‘objectness’ of the body – a medium that is vulnerable to the stresses of life. I want the flesh I make to embody the human condition. (Source)

The figures in Salzl’s art are all suffering from some kind of conflict or anguish. She says she is most interested in expressing the psychological and emotional aspects of human nature, and does it in a personal way rather than in a cliched, way about our society as a whole.

I use allegory and metaphor to to express my particular anxieties and what I perceive to be a generalized psychosis in society. Instead of portraying dead Afghanistan civilians or animals that are going extinct at exponential rates, I paint people with gnarled, anguished flesh and and haunted faces that place them in conflicting settings that are familiar yet foreign. (Source)

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Dismantling Stereotypes of Beauty and femininity

 

The relationships of women to themselves and their environment fuel the narratives of Jennifer Nehrbass’ paintings and are formed from the binary oppositions between the images. By dismantling the roles and stereotypes of beauty and femininity Nehrbass examines the psychology that leads women to go to extremes to maintain beauty and style.

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Music ID2

This stop motion video was mainly created out of yarn. It’s beautiful.

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Andy Warhol’s Groundbreaking Computer Art Recovered

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Digitally created visuals are so ubiquitous today, from commercial applications to advertising to contemporary art, that it is hard to remember a time when it was a rudimentary technology used only be a few specialists. Commodore’s “Amiga 1000” changed this, bringing image creation programs into the home, allowing anyone to create original and edited computer images for the first time. To promote the public launch of their groundbreaking model, Commodore asked Andy Warhol to create an image using the software, demonstrating the accessibility of the program, and the possibilities in the hands of a pioneering visual artist. Seen in the following clip of Warhol “painting” Blondie singer Debbie Harry in 1985, it was assumed that Warhol only used the program once, his digital experiment being forgotten. 

It may have stayed that way had it not been for the curiosity and effort of another pioneering artist, Cory Arcangel. Well-known for his early hacked video games and glitched aesthetic that came to be known as Net Art (or Post-Conceptualism), Arcangel was curious if the Prince of Pop Art created any other works on the early digital format. This search led to conversations with curators at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, who owned most of the equipment (discs, hard drives and floppies) that might contain these experiments. Connecting Arcangel to the nearby Carnegie Melon University’s computing club, who have experience in recovery and “retrocomputing”, the combined effort to recover Warhol’s files took three years.

In a more tech-savvy description of the difficult process at Wired.com, Liz Stinson notes, “Because of the disks’ age and fragility, extracting data posed a serious risk. The archiving and viewing process could irreversibly damage the content, but letting the disks slowly degrade was an even worse option.”

The team was eventually able to recover eighteen images (some of which are shown above), among the first digitally made images by an already famous visual artist. Describing the astoundingly original files, Arcangel said, “What’s amazing is that by looking at these images, we can see how quickly Warhol seemed to intuit the essence of what it meant to express oneself, in what then was a brand-new medium: the digital.”

A documentary about the recovery, Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments, will premiere May 10th at Carnegie Mellon (and will then be viewable at http://nowseethis.org/.), after which many more of the images will probably be released to the public for the first time ever. (via wired)

 

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The Graffiti Of War Project

The Graffiti Of War is a project started by Jason Parsons, an Iraq war veteran who was deeply moved by the graffiti done by fellow soldiers in the mideast. When Jason came back stateside he was having bad bouts of PTSD and decided to create a book documenting the graffiti left behind by thousands of soldiers as a form of therapy. This once simple idea has grown into a full time  mission to support the troops and tell their stories one photo at a time.

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