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Justin DeVine Creates An Amusingly Strange Mashup Of The Muppets And Twin Peaks

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Our society, by and large, seems to love mashups of popular culture. Adding to the growing list of amusing combinations is Justin DeVine’s illustrations of Muppets as Twin Peaks characters. Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Fozzie the Bear take the roles of Special Agent Dale Cooper, Laura Palmer, and the Log Lady, respectively. DeVine’s watercolor drawings include the clothing, scenes, and quotes from David Lynch’s cult classic television show but whose characters are replaced with the gregarious Muppet clan.

If you aren’t familiar with Twin Peaks, it’s a surreal drama that follows the investigation headed by FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper into murder of homecoming queen Laura Palmer. It takes place in a small town, and explores the facade of small-town values and the seedier layers that lurk beneath it. Pairing this with the happy-go-lucky Muppets creates some strange imagery; not necessarily in the same way as Lynch crafted Twin Peaks, but odd nonetheless.

All of these illustrations are available as prints in DeVine’s InPrnt shop.

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Daniel Entonado

Daniel Entonado

 

Daniel Entonado‘s work is friendly and wonderfully disproportionate. He conjures up whimsical situations, and executes them in a style mildly reminiscent of patchwork. I enjoy how his colors are not quite bright and not exactly pastel, but a nice medium.  

 

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Jim Kazanjian

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Artist Jim Kazanjian’s work is a series of dramatic black & white backdrops; photography of the surreal.

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Music Makes Paint Splatter Dance

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paint splatter Martin Klimas photography1

Photographer Martin Klimas‘ series “What Does Music Look Like?” is a fun attempt at answering that very question.  He uses paint as a vehicle for sound.  Klimas places brightly colored paints on a surface that sits just above a speaker.  Playing loud music such as Kraftwerk or Miles Davis makes the paint splatter above the speaker  with the vibrations making it “dance”.  The paint jumps and splattes while being captured by the camera.  Klimas snapped approximately 1,000 photographs to capture the set.

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Uniqlo’s Lucky Line Surprises New York City

Uniqlo Lucky Line

 

If you’re like us at B/D then you are just as anxious as we are about the surprise installation taking place on the 2nd floor of the Uniqlo NYC flagship store. The viral video released in February by Uniqlo only gave us vague clues but now more information has leaked in anticipation of the March 28th grand opening. To add to the mystery Uniqlo has just released the above video which gives us a bit more of an indication of what they’re up to. Whatever they’re doing it’s clear that it’s going to be an exciting collision of art and fashion (and Starbucks!)!
To add to the excitement Uniqlo is kicking off their Lucky Line where shoppers can create pixelated avatars, hang out in futuristic virtual worlds, and even stand in line at Uniqlo to win all sorts of giveaways and prizes. It’s anything but ordinary and a fresh take on shopping.

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Yuri Suzuki’s Phonograph Globes, Flame Organs, Theremin Radios

 Yuri Suzuki is an English artist/designer/inventor who has been making some really remarkable objects. They’re not really “art” in a traditional sense, but they’re not products or inventions that would ever be used by The People, nor are they simple design ideas. What they are, is amazing–phonograph globes, flame organs, theremin radios. Yuri is also a big supporter of the DIY community, so if you’re wondering how to make any of his objects, he has instructions for most of them on his website. Suzuki’s is a very special brain. Check out videos of his objects in action after the jump! ( via )

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Diane Arbus: Photographing Freaks Or The Costumes We Wear Year-Round

Diane Arbus - Photography

Diane Arbus - Photography Diane Arbus - Photography

Diane Arbus - Photography

As we wave goodbye to Halloween, let’s take a minute to mediate on the innately striking work of Diane Arbus and her unbiased approach to documenting not just the spookier side of humanity, but even more so, the masks or costumes we present to the world as a species, as human beings, as ourselves . . . year-round.

Now, when I use the word “unbiased” here I am not suggesting Arbus’s eye is roaming and invisible. Quite the contrary. Her eye is always distinctly there: focused, from one frame to the next. This “unbiased” quality has more to do with her indiscriminate examination of each subject in the same oddly intimate and unflinching way– regardless of class, age, gender, sexual preference, or race. In other words, a child with a toy hand grenade in the park looks equally as strange as the a woman lounging next to a toy poodle or a handful of residents dressed up on Halloween at a home for the mentally retarded. No one person, group, or act is more privileged. No one is all the more beautiful. We are all playing dress-up as far as identity and image is concerned.

By seeking out each individual’s innate desire to present him or herself and critically or creatively twisting that into her own perception of costume in each person’s presentation, Arbus became not just a photographer, but an alchemist, shifting our ideas of self, reality, and personal intention. Whether you are a part of celebrity culture or a more marginalized society spread out along the fringe, Arbus’s certain way of looking did not glorify one way of living over the other.

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Diamonds Best Friend

 


James Hick’s elegant self initiated video for the Genghis Tron track ‘Recursion’ which utilizes neon diamonds and glitter soaked mountains.

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