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Guillaume Megevand’s Blood & Firecrackers – Thai Vegetarian piercing Festival

 

Freelance photographer Guillaume Megevand’s Blood & Firecrackers series Blood & Firecrackers is a truly beautiful and gruesome series of images. Here is what this self taught and world traveling documentary photographer has to say about this body of work.

‘This series of photos was taken during the Vegetarian Festival in Phuket, Thailand. Over nine days local residents of Chinese ancestry strictly observe a vegetarian diet for the purpose of spiritual cleansing and merit-making. Sacred rituals are performed at various Chinese shrines and temples. The festival involves various processions, temple offerings and culminates with walking on hot coals, climbing knife-blade ladders, self-piercing the skin and so on.

Their special 9-day diet seems to allow the participants of the festival to be inhabited by the gods since they apparently feel no physical pain. This seems difficult to believe, but they really appear to be possessed and also to be beyond being hurt or feeling pain despite what they go through.

The most amazing moment for me was the last evening of the festival when thousands of citizens came out of their homes to throw firecrackers on the participants of the final procession. During these few hours, Phuket was more like a war zone rather than the quiet tourist town we all know. Luckily for everyone involved, this war zone is one of joy and faith and the culmination of nine incredible days.” (via feature shoot)

 

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Real Fish Heads Used In Photographs To Satirize Everyday Human Life



Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard places real fish from her fish monger on doll parts to recreate, amuse, and in a way, criticize/satirize aspects of human society.

Of her work, Dr. Didier Rouzeyrol poeticizes:

The fish of acbe do not look at the ground.
They play there. They play. They play with us.
They place us into these pieces.
Parts in an act, in a photograph.

European bred and born, Becker-Echivard could easily be a character in a Julie Delpy film– charmingly dedicated to absurd yet accessible content with an undeniably curious or obsessive edge. For instance, after the setting and shooting is done, this Parisian artist tops off each project by eating it for dinner, stating, “It is the perfect recycling of art. Nothing is left over – and I can live from it.”

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The Glass Eye Maker

the glass eye maker

I love documentaries about things that I didn’t know I wanted to know about like the short mini documentary above. This is a short documentary about the very last glass eye maker in Berlin. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Willem Harbers’ Marble And Steel

Dutch artist Willem Harbers creates scultpures that  juxtapose metal and marble into works that bring together nature and machinery in cold, polished, and futuristic forms.

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Deedee Cheriel’s Alternative Reality

Los Angeles artist Deedee Cheriel explores narrative and conflict in her paintings, drawing influence from the landscapes of the Pacific Northwest, east Indian cultures, temple imagery and the punk rock scene. Her works are filled with horse headed figures encountering any number of strange creatures from humans with bird heads, to mammoth sized owls, bears and magical beings. Each piece draws you farther into her unique world with everything turned inside out, but somehow making total sense.

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Hollywood Contact Sheets Reveal The Moments Between Scenes Of Iconic Films

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Rear WIndow, Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

1980-Raging_Bull_2-De-Niro

Raging Bull, Christine Loss

Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant

Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant

© Sid Avery/mptvimages.com

Giant,© Sid Avery/mptvimages.com

In the newly-published book titled Hollywood Frame by Frame, author Karina Longworth examines the contact sheet, a necessity in film making before the advent of digital technology. The prints were used by photographer as a way to review and edit their work, and the sheets contain small thumbnails of multiple shots. They were marked, scribbled on, carefully examined to find the perfect shot later used in advertising.

These sheets are alluring; not for how interesting and different each individual frame is, but it’s a tiny glimpse into what went on behind the scenes in famous films. You’re able to see what was and wasn’t chosen, as well as the outtakes. A description for Hollywood Frame by Frame describes it as, “…it’s often the photos not chosen that best capture the true spirit of their subjects and the life they lead after the director yells cut. This was never truer than in the classic Hollywood era, where behind-the-scenes photos were carefully vetted for marketing purposes and unapproved shots were never expected to be seen again.

Some of the films included in the book are: Some Like It Hot, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Taxi Driver, and Silence of the Lambs. It was published by Princeton Architectural Press.

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Kimiko Yoshida

Kimiko Yoshida

Since Japanese photographer Kimiko Yoshida “fled [her] homeland to escape the mortifying servitude and humiliating fate of Japanese women, she seeks to take a feminist stance in protest against contemporary cliches of seduction” and the general stereotyped portrayal of women-hood. Her self portraits transform and that to her is the ultimate value of work.

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Luis Hernan’s Photographs Reveal Colorful WiFi Signal Visualizations

Luis Hernan Luis Hernan Luis Hernan

Designer Luis Hernan‘s project, “Digital Ethereal,” captures colorful “spirit photographs” of Wi-Fi signals. Using long exposure photography alongside the Kirilian Device mobile app, an app created specifically for this project that translates WiFi signals into color gradations, Hernan creates stunning photographs that feature ghostly swirls of color and activity. Hernan’s project represents the ways we can thread different kinds of technology together to create something new – something that visualizes a field of energy that is omnipresent, yet eludes our physical sensibilities. Of his WiFi light paintings, Hernan writes, “I believe our interaction with this landscape of electromagnetic signals, described by Antony Dunne as Hertzian Space, can be characterised in the same terms as that with ghosts and spectra. They both are paradoxical entities, whose untypical substance allows them to be an invisible presence. In the same way, they undergo a process of gradual substantiation to become temporarily available to perception. Finally, they both haunt us. Ghosts, as Derrida would have it, with the secrets of past generations. Hertzian space, with the frustration of interference and slowness.” (via laughing squid

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