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Jesse Moynihan

Jesse Moynihan

Philly-based Jesse Moynihan draws comics, plays guitar and violin, is a part of post-Supertramp supergroup Make A Rising. He also like jogging and jump-roping. I’m going to go ahead and imply that maybe he’d like jogging buddy if you’re in the area. I love the heros / villains in his comics.

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Olivier Ratsi’s Morphing Vortex Pulls Viewers Into An Unreachable Dimension

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Onion Skin

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Olivier Ratsi‘s latest project Onion Skin is an attempt to create an unreachable plane by physical means. Two walls are connected at 90 degree angles, and a series of visual light displays plays simultaneously off of the joined walls, created a uniquely intangible, unreachable dimension. This type of work is typically elaborate for Ratsi, who describes his works as “The deconstruction or fragmentation acts mainly as an emotion trigger, which does not aim at showing what things could be, but more at questioning their references.”

Shapes that begin to form are quickly changed, morphing into others and blending into a seemingly 3-Dimensional landscape. Ratsi, who is also the co-founder of visual art label AntiVJ, gives the viewer a sound component to coincide with Onion Skin‘s hypnotic geometric shapes overlapping, peeling and unfolding. Ratsi explains, “Its aim is to generate a break with the meaning of the original items, to propose a new viewing angle and to provide the public a new field of experience, another way of looking at space and time.”

Onion skin is currently installed in Belo Horizonte, Brazil (until November 30th, 2013), after which it will be included at an exhibition at the Parque Lage in Rio De Janeiro (December 7th and 8th, 2013). (via designboom)

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Behind-the-Scenes with “Art Works Every Time” Artist: Harrison Roberts

Harrison Roberts' Studio

Harrison Roberts' Studio

Harrison Roberts’ work combines vertiginous, mandalic quality linework, texture and patterns with a pop color sensibility. Harrison is near and dear to our hearts as he actually was a fearless B/D intern earlier this year! We’re really excited he’ll be part of our upcoming “Art Works Every Time” exhibition! Just 4 days away now…

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Robert Landau’s Photographs Of Larger Than Life Rock ‘n’ Roll Billboards On The Sunset Strip In The 1960’s

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Photographer Robert Landau captured stunning rock ‘n’ roll billboards in the late ’60s and ’70s. Primarily inspired by album art, the billboards were massive monuments that took on a life of their own. Reigning over the Sunset Strip, which was at the time the lifeblood of the music industry, the billboards became more than just advertisements. They were physical embodiments of a vibrant scene populated by colorful rock stars and tantalizing music idols. 

In an interview with Collectors Weekly, Landau says, “There was a whole scene going on along the Strip, but it was really focused on rock ’n’ roll. The billboards captured all that energy, and also some of the excess of money and drugs.” The billboards themselves were anything but flat; at the time, they were hand painted using specific techniques to ensure they could be read from a distance.
Around the time billboards roamed the streets was also the height of some true album art artistry. “It was a joint process,” Landau says of the intersection of the two, “… in most cases, the musicians had already commissioned amazing artwork for their albums.” The tricky part was then translating the album art from a square sleeve to the more traditional rectangular frame of a billboard. The solution was to add an extra dimension to it, enabling figures and objects to burst out of the picture and become almost 3D in effect. Billboard artists got creative, lighting up 3D lampshades and creating silhouettes that seemed to loom like titans.
“It wasn’t about getting somebody to a cash register to buy something,” Landau says, commenting on the uniqueness of these everyday artworks. “It was about creating an image, and about a trust between the artist and the record companies.”
Even as people bemoan the death of the album, at least there are photos like Landau’s that remind us of a time when music was larger than life.
Landau’s work will be on exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles starting on March 24th. (via Collectors Weekly)

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Documentary Features Retired Chemistry Teacher’s Incredible Geometric Ceramics

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PORCELAINIA from Dave Altizer on Vimeo.

Filmmaker Dave Altizer’s short mini-documentary Porcelainia features Bobby Jaber, an educator, scientist, and artist. After Jaber retired from teaching chemistry, he was able to focus his energies on porcelain work, specifically geometric designs based on molecular shapes. Jaber’s approach to his work is inspired by his scientist/artist predecessors, most notably Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome. Though he’s had a little financial success with some of his work, Jaber is clearly motivated by love and dedication to his craft. Be sure to stick around after the credits to catch Jaber’s priceless reaction to current technology.

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Michael Ray Charles Confronts Evolving Racial Stereotypes In His Paintings

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The paintings by Michael Ray Charles depict controversial imagery regarding racial stereotypes from the past and present commercial culture. In Print Mag, he suggests his usage of such stereotypes are not designed to thrill, throw, or flaunt, but more so to excavate their societal relevance, revulsion, and power– examining how each affects our personal symbolic lexicons.  It’s an ongoing compounding struggle to discern and detach from this branding.

Regarding this, Charles asserts, “I think about so many people whose lives these images have affected. A lot of Black people have died and many are dying under the weight of these images. That’s motivation enough for me to explore, and deal with, these things.”

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Miao Xiaochun

 

Miao Chunxiao’s new media work employs the latest three-dimensional computer technology to create  montage images and virtual realities that interpret historic artworks, especially classic paintings before and after the Renaissance.

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Let Go

David Wilson directed this amazing illustrated animation music video of The Japanese Popstars, Let Go. Along with David, Keaton Henson and Andres Guzman were the illustrators behind these amazing stream of wacky, grotesque, and hypnotizing consciousness.

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