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Yinka Shonibare Interview for the BBC

Yinka Shonibare is hands down one of my favorite contemporary artists. His stunning explorations into world history, the poetics and policies of identity, authenticity, globalization and imperialism raise interesting political questions without being patronizing. They are beautiful on a formal level, as well as conceptual.


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The Tale of How


The Tale of How from Shy the Sun on Vimeo.

This song reminds me of the operatic magical feel of Nightmare Before Christmas- this video is not unlike an ancient Gravure coming to life. Really enchanting motion work. I love the talking rats, the fantasy- Secret of Nimh meets Hayao Miyazaki meets Japanese woodcut- just stunning.


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Mike Nason


WELCOME from Michael Nason on Vimeo. Read More >


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Scar Boy

scar-boyscar-boy-2scar-boy-1Beautifully rendered drawings of women, clusters of wartime machinery, and mushroom clouds of weapons by Chris Scarborough.


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Allyson Mitchell’s Humanimals


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Siggi Eggertson

siggi-eggertsonI’ve posted him before- but I can’t get enough of Siggi!


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Brandon Hirzel/Bemo

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Studio Orta

studio-ortaFrom February-March 2007, the artists installed ‘Antarctic Village’ in Antarctica, travelling from Buenos Aires aboard the Hercules KC130 flight on an incredible journey. Taking place during the Austral summer, the ephemeral installation coincided with the last of the scientific expeditions before the winter months, before the ice mass becomes too thick to traverse. Aided by the logistical crew and scientists stationed at the Marambio Antarctic Base situated on the Seymour-Marambio Island, (64°14’S 56°37’W), Jorge Orta scouted the continent by helicopter, searching for different locations for the temporary encampment of their 50 dome-shaped dwellings. Antarctic Village is a symbol of the plight of those struggling to transverse borders and to gain the freedom of movement necessary to escape political and social conflict. Dotted along the ice, the tents formed a settlement reminiscent of the images of refugee camps we see so often reported about on our television screens and newspapers. Physically the installation Antarctic Village is emblematic of Ortas’ body of work, composed of what could be termed modular architecture and reflecting qualities of nomadic shelters and campsites.

The dwellings themselves are hand stitched together by a traditional tent maker with sections of flags from countries around the world, along with extensions of clothes and gloves, symbolising the multiplicity and diversity of people. Here the arm of face-less white-collar worker’s shirt hangs, there the sleeve of a children’s sweater. Together the flags and dissected clothes emblazoned with silkscreen motifs referencing the UN Declaration for Human Rights make for a physical embodiment of a ‘Global Village’.


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