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Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

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Tae Querney

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Tae Querney is a  New York City artist whose unique illustration style brings the content to life with texture and color. Check out her website for more beautiful illustrations.

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Adam Batchelor

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Adam Batchelor is an illustrator from Norwich, UK. His work heavily uses white space to draw attention to his detailed illustrations. His illustrations look as if you dropped something on the floor…and waited way more than the 5 second rule to pick it up. A little gross, but beautifully done! Batchelors’ series Nepali Waste (which the piece above is a part of)  uses a variety of mixed media like colored pencil, dirt, blood, and even mosquito! Very interesting.

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Beautiful/Decay Book 2 Preview!

Preview of the front cover along with the flap that folds inside designed by master of bits, Julien Ducourthial.

Preview of the Book 2 front cover along with the flap that folds inside. Designed by master of bits, Julien Ducourthial.


The second edition of Beautiful/Decay has just been sent to press last week! The theme is “What A Mess!” and plays with the idea of “messyness” in all sorts of mediums and in my humble opinion, features some of my personal favorite artists to date (pssst, be sure to subscribe and reserve your copy because they’re sure to run out fast). We went back to the basics of art making (highly refined practice of hot glue-gunning pom-poms and popsicle sticks, you know, the stuff you learned in kindergarten) to create some essential elements in the layout design. Then from there we started exploring the faded and slightly warped visual language of scanned print outs to create the feeling of an artist’s studio or workspace. You’ll see a couple different examples as to what that means exactly in the spreads I’m giving you a sneak peak on. See the craziness after the jump!

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Soey Milks’ Ladies

 

Can’t find much info about Soey Milk but I love these delicately drawn and lush paintings of white haired ladies who look like they are about to cast a spell on you. (via supersonic electronic)

 

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Andy Vible Replaces Heads With Miscellaneous Objects In His FIgurative Sculpture

Recent MICA grad Andy Vible makes “life-size sculptures of human bodies whose heads have been replaced by everyday objects”.

Straightforward enough. Or maybe not. By decapitating his sculptures he makes us feel slightly uncomfortable. In a way, we’ve lost our heads too, and that’s a good place to start. Without a head (without a brain), we are left fully subject to Vible’s will. He has our attention. And that’s where the “everyday objects” come into play. Vible inserts these elements (cctv cameras, loudspeakers, reference globes, birdhouses, etc.) into his works in order to “communicate in a type of language that everyone understands”. In common language and without our personal projections, the works are able to come across clearly. Click the link and hit your bookmark button. You know what to do.

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Rocks And Crystals As Inspiration For Carly Waito And Three Other Artists

Amy Brener

Amy Brener

Carly Waito

Carly Waito

Jonathan Latiano

Jonathan Latiano

Debra Baxter, You have to believe we are magic, (barf bag)

Debra Baxter, You have to believe we are magic, (barf bag)

These four artists are interested in exploring nature through crystals, minerals and natural stones.  Toronto-based Carly Waito makes small oil paintings (about 5×6 inches) of crystals and minerals.  Inspired by the natural world Waito is interested in geology, geometry and light.  With a sense of wonder and curiosity, Waito explores via paint tiny mineral specimens, revealing the beauty and magic nature is capable of creating.

Seattle-based Debra Baxter uses stones and minerals, and their contrasts or relationships to investigate human interactions.  To address notions such as human power plays, vulnerability and gender differences, Baxter plays titles like You have to believe we are magic (barf bag), 2010 off visual displays of ceramic, minerals and reflective acrylic.  Her sculptures become small visual metaphors replete with symbols and juxtapositions that form ideas and narrative.

Amy Brener works by layering resin, glass and Fresnel lens to create light sensitive sculptures that resemble large crystals or minerals.  Brener’s process involves mixing and pouring pigmented resin into wooden frameworks.  Only able to control certain aspects of the process, Brener embraces the surprises that happen along the way.  The process gives her sculptures a quality that exists between the geological and the man-made.

Jonathan Latiano’s Points of Contention, 2011, was an installation at School 33 Art Center in Baltimore.  The piece was made out of plastics, resins and polymers and appeared to be exploding out of the floor.  Meant to address the effects the sculpture’s materials have on the geological landscape, Latiano’s work is a visual reminder of our impact on nature.

 

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Mike Rea’s Meticulously Crafted Wooden Sculptures Are A Film Nerd’s Heaven

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Chicago artist Mike Rea builds hyper-realistic wooden replicas of objects that have a connection to the culture of a stereotypical heterosexual male. His sculptures are either props from science fiction cinema, or personal memories – made primarily from wood, burlap and Styrofoam. Rea builds things like jail cells, video cameras used for filming pornography, Anaconda snakes, pick axes, robots, strange bits of machinery, Scuba diving tanks, and amplifiers. All are meticulously crafted and are rooted in pop culture. Rea is a self confessed film geek, watching up to 3 films a day and draws a lot of inspiration from the ‘swagger’ and macho attitudes in films like Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof.

Rea describes his own take on his practice:

There is a kind of wry sense of humor to the work, but at the same time it’s coupled with this process—this meticulous, very specific kind of over-detailed expression of these contradictions and maybe the most stupid stuff for subject matter. I’ll spend six months on a stupid joke seeing if that makes it better. They’re these large wooden sculptures that are hopefully a little funny and a little bit dark. They’re probably over-built, which is usually just a process of me making lots of mistakes and having to add another layer to cover up where a seam didn’t match. (Source)

Using humor and wit, Rea is trying to see how our desires and obsessions (usually those of a hetero male – weapons, substance abuse and the opposite sex) are tied into popular culture. Whether you are a nerd or not, you will no doubt be delighted by the incredible wooden wonderland Rea creates. See more sculptures after the jump.

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