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AARON SHUNGA

SF-based Aaron Shunga sums up his funky comics with this very long sentence, “TAKING STRICT DIRECTION FROM NO-WAVE PUNK, DAVID LYNCHSUEHIRO MARUO, DAN CLOWESEC COMICS, KATSUHIRO OTOMO, THE SUPPLANTED IMPULSES FOUND IN THE FLAVORLESS PULP OF AMERICANA, POST-WAR JAPAN, AND THE ART OF PSYCHEDELIC SHOCK SCHIZOPHRENIA, HIS AMBTIONS CARVE AWAY NEW BOUNDARIES IN POP-NIHILISM.Couldn’t put it any better myself. Really loving the kid’s book layout vibe, too. Ingest.

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Stunning Portraits of Albinos by Gustavo Lacerda

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Photographer Gustavo Lacerda.

It’s a common myth that all albinos have red eyes, a myth easily dispelled by these stunning portraits by Gustavo Lacerda. Since 2009 Lacerda, a São Paulo-based fine art photographer, has been researching and approaching albinos to photograph in his studio.

Many of his subjects, used being treated as ‘outsiders’, were initially uncomfortable with the process but later felt great pride after seeing the results.

This series has been making the rounds online and three of Lacerda’s images were featured in the Pirelli/Masp Photography Collection, which honors excellence in the Brazillian photography community.

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Daydreams And Dark Wanderings: The Hazily Beautiful Photography Of Lunakhods

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Lunakhods is an art collective comprising two Toronto-based photographers. Drenched in color and filled with a luminescent haze, their images resemble daydreams experienced beneath the heat of a midday sun. With a touch of surrealism, otherwise familiar landscapes are made unearthly: glowing wells appear in deserts at twilight, and eerie fogs cloud out distant views of mountains and trees. There is a competing sense drowsiness and vitality, transcending consciousness and materializing an alternative reality.

Lunakhod’s photography conveys an emotional and almost cinematic experience of the world. Human behavior is turned into a bizarre and deeply metaphorical reflection of itself; like muses of our solitary, dream-wandering selves, masked figures haunt dark roadsides and rooftops. Elsewhere, someone holds aloft a garden flamingo in an act of both absurdity and reverie. Time is suspended; past and present collide in images aged with dust. In the world of dreams that Lunakhods creates, temporality and concrete meaning become irrelevant — instead, their images explore the spirit, eternity, and subjectivity of a semi-lucid moment.

Visit Lunakhods’ website, Facebook, and Tumblr to view more of their sensorial images. Their work will also be on display at The Keystone Gallery’s exhibition Less is More in Toronto starting June 5th.

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Takahiro Iwasaki Constructs Elaborate Landscapes From Cloth, Dust, And Human Hair

Takahiro Iwasaki - Cloth, fibers, dust, human hair

Takahiro Iwasaki - Cloth, fibers, dust, human hair

Takahiro Iwasaki - Cloth, fibers, dust, human hair

Artist Takahiro Iwasaki is a master when it comes to constructing elaborate, miniature landscapes. However, these small-scale scenes are not formed from Lego’s, but from much more unlikely and unstable items such as cloth fiber, dust, and human hair. This Japanese artist takes the most miniscule, seemingly insignificant materials and uses them to create something incredibly complex and enchanting. His newest installations, which are part of the series titled Out of Disorder, contain mini-scenes of recognizable landmarks such as Coney Island, ferris wheel and all. Inspired by painted landscapes on Japanese folding screens, Iwasaki comments on his work in relation to its inspiration.

“Just as the artist of the screens did, I would like to revisit a commonplace everyday scene from today’s Japan, and just as the screens embody a smooth flow from one season to the next, I hope to capture, in my work, the graceful transition of a Japanese landscape from past to present.”

Each tree, building, factory, and rollercoaster in Iwasaki’s work are brightly colored and fragile, as many of them are enclosed in a glass case. This glass reveals one of the most captivating elements of the landscapes; the layers of clothing that make up the earth in many of the installations. Each cloth is filled with diverse colors and clashing patterns, revealing a mishmash of layers that resemble section of sediment in the soil. They form the rolling hills and steep slopes that make up the miniature environments. However, not all of the artist’s creations are constructed from recycled cloth, but from toothbrushes, as well. Telephone towers sprout out of Iwasaki’s toothbrush bristles in this strange yet familiar installation. Out of Disorder is on display now at Takahiro Iwasaki’s first solo show Takahiro Iwasaki: In Focus at the Asian Society Museum in New York. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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Noa Kaplan’s Giant Dust Bunny

Noa P. Kaplan is a visual artist living in Los Angeles, California. Last year I had the pleasure of walking through Kaplan’s giant dust bunny, installed at UCLA. It was a weird feeling, feeling both small and large at the same time… Her larger body of artwork examines the impact of technology on production processes, material structure, and scale. This piece in particular, however, is specifically interested in providing a new scale to something small, a dust bunny, in order to design new associations and emotional connections with the clump of dust that we would otherwise sweep under the rug in disgust. The artist explains the context of this piece so beautifully: “Though mundane, a dust bunny bears unexpected symmetry to the most complex and baffling systems, such as the accretion of cosmic matter or the organization of memories in the brain.”

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Time Is Running Out!!!

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Have you submitted to our “Art Works Every Time” T-Shirt Design Competition? If not, then I ask… Really? Why not? Don’t you like fortune and fame? Sure, you do. Wouldn’t winning $1,000.45 and/or being featured in a group show at a hot gallery improve your current situation? Of course, it would. So submit today! Don’t wait another minute!

THE DEADLINE IS APRIL 15TH!!!!

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Bijan Berahimi

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Bijan Berahimi is a Los Angeles local designer, illustrator, publisher, and more. He has recently updated his website with fresh works from posters, to postcards; web sites to exhibits. His work is light-hearted and welcoming, full of color and suprises. Bijan also publishes an e-zine titled FISKa growing resource for designers – a platform for discussion & participation.

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This Is What Getting A Tattoo Looks Like In Slow-Motion

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The Parisian tattoo artist Gaëtan Le Gargasson, also known as GueT Deep, recently released a seductive and hypnotic slow-motion video of himself tattooing the arm of a woman named Fabrice. Needless to say, the fascinating video immediately went viral, and it has since being posted, it has accrued over 600,000 views. Even today, tattoo art carries a stigma, associated mostly with toughness, roughness, and grit; GueT’s stunning video highlights the more delicate side of the work, documenting the intense precision needed to craft the perfect piece. As the needle pulsates, the artist’s hand effortlessly tames the mechanical beast, breaking it to his will and vision.

Part of what makes this video (and the subsequent gifs, created by Design Boom) so striking is the apparent harmony between the organic body and the mechanical tattoo gun; as the tool ticks and marks the passage of time with unending accuracy, the human flesh bubbles, rises and falls with the ink. Like a heartbeat, each plunge of the needle causes the skin to ripple rhythmically. The piece on which GueT is working figures into these theme effortlessly; it appears to be a design composed of both geometric and natural, organic shapes.

In this slow-motion experience, the tattoo itself matters little; the artwork here is the action of the ink, not the end result. The video is more akin to a dance piece than to a painting. Deeply theatrical and performative, it is simultaneously soothing— mesmerizing, even— and anxiety-inducing. We watch the drama unfold, hoping that the hand does not slip, that everything goes according to plan. Take a look. (via DesignBoom and HuffPost)

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