Get Social:

Julie Heffernan

Julie Heffernan‘s paintings take all the tropes of Northern Renaissance painting, combines them, and makes them into absurd works that feel like art history collages rendered by one of the masters themselves. She has a show coming up at the Mark Moore Gallery on November 3, so if you like what you see, make sure to check out her opening, it sounds great!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

MATHWRATH

ONLINE DATING

ONLINE DATING

AKA, the summation of my love affair with the internet. I saw this site on Rhizome.org 6 months ago, truly loved it for a day, forgot about it for a little bit, then wasn’t able to find it again and instantly regretted it (I remembered it as “MATHLAB” instead of “MATHWRATH”). Fortunately I was able to reunite with it yesterday when I saw it on VVork. I feel as if a part of my life has come full circle…

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Walter Oltmann Weaves Wire Into Haunting Images Of Skulls And Babies

Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration

Walter Oltmann is an artist from South Africa who weaves together aluminum wire “doily” segments to create gauzy, black-and-white images. His more recent works—which were featured recently in an exhibition titled Cradle at the Goodman Gallery in Cape Town—depict skulls and sleeping children. Through tonal layering, Oltmann creates a ghostly, semi-transparent depth, and each of the drawings are their own sculptural objects. The result is a series of eerie, ancient-looking images that invoke a theme (and contemporary relevance) of ideas surrounding death, the fragility of life, and the passage of time.

Oltmann is fascinated by the processes of geology, evolution, and human history. As the press release for Cradle informs us, his work draws on the ideas set forth by Simon Calley in Sculpture and Archaeology (2011), which describes archeology as a discipline of “examining our relationship to time and our place to its continuity [. . .] It is an activity concerned with the present [and] with projecting ourselves into the past” (Source). Historically and culturally, skulls have been enduring symbols of death and transience; the image of a sleeping child, which has been used as a grave marker, is representative of tranquility, rest, and the final “long sleep.” By finding and exploring the similarities in these motifs, Oltmann unearths an age-old melancholia and retrospective on the finitude of human life.

You can learn more about the theories behind Oltmann’s work on the Goodman Gallery’s exhibitions page, and view his Artsy page here. (Via Faith is Torment)

Currently Trending

Astounding Close-Up Photographs Of Animal Eyeballs

husky_dog

Husky Dog

kramers_parrot

Kramer’s Parrott

discus_fish

Discus Fish

horse

Horse

For his series Animal Eyes, the Armenian photographer Suren Manvelyan captures close-ups of animal eyeballs belonging to diverse creatures, revealing both the complexity and universality of the organ. Beneath his macro lens, these small circular organs appear paradoxically vast; at times, their curved surfaces resemble the entirety of planet Earth as seen from space, cloudy with ribbons of pigmentation. Here, the eyes, considered to be windows to the soul, reflect back a cosmic realm that evokes the metaphysical, but at the same time, they are startlingly material. The pupil, a seeming abyss ascending into the unknown, is cushioned by substantial tissues that ground us firmly within the corporeal world.

Though the species shot here vary immensely, a comforting uniformity emerges from the images; through the changes in iris hue and pupil dilation, there is a shared urgency in each gaze, a sweeping desire simply to see. The horse, his eyes veiled in straw-like lashes, fixes the lens with the same intensity as the hippo, whose wrinkled, fleshy eyelids peel back. Where most photography relies upon the assumption that we may watch without fear of being observed ourselves, Manvelyan’s images inspire within us a sense of being seen; are these opened eyes, these celestial orbs, looking back at us? What do they see? Check out the artist’s photographs of the human eye here. (via Agonistica)

Currently Trending

The Tiniest Landscapes Painted On Miniature Pieces Of Food

Miniature painting
Miniature painting
kale-5
kale-4
For the Turkish artist Hasan Kale, the tiniest morsel of food inspires visions of sweeping landscapes. Using his finger as a palate, he adorns almonds, M&Ms, and the most translucent layers of an onion with astonishing renderings of his native Istanbul. Where most landscapes take up entire museum walls, commanding attention with their sheer immensity, Kale’s work does the opposite. In these miraculous works of macro painting, the infinite nature of the earth, sea, and sky collides with the impossibly minuscule, heightening the preciousness of the Turkish terrain.

Here, snack foods become as wondrous as great feats of nature and man. On thin slice of banana, a storm rages, its brushstrokes transforming the very texture of the fruit into that of a saturated canvas. On the inner flesh of an almond, he imagines the legendary baroque architecture of the Nusretiye Mosque. The iconic building becomes vertically stretched as in a romantic masterpiece, extending upwards to conform to the natural shape of the almond. On these tiny surfaces, the grandiosity of the city’s architecture is expressed through the vibrancy of color and the dreamy, sweeping whims of the artist’s brush.

Perhaps the most poignant aspect of Kale’s work is its impermanence. Unlike the great canvases entombed in museums, these paintings will decay, perish, or be lost. The banana will rot into mush; the fragile quail egg might crumble. A stunning mosque might accidentally be eaten. But in the meantime, these imagined landmarks exist for the sake of our wonderment. Take a look. (via Colossal)

Currently Trending

Star Wars Meets M.C. Escher In This Rad Diorama

 

 

Fill your nerd quota for the day and check out this piece of lego sculpture made by Paul Vermeesch. It’s a diorama reproduction of M.C. Escher’s “Relativity” using Star Wars legos. It’s lit from the inside and even includes a faithful depiction of the plot from the much loved film series. Nice work, Paul!

Currently Trending

Eudes De Santana

4614379577_ca5006eb48_z

Barcelona based fashion/advertising photographer and director, Eudes De Santana, originally went to school for graphic design. While finishing his degree, he worked on photographic commissions for fashion editorials, catalogs, and advertising campaigns. His work, exuding hip energy and sex, has us fantasize for this sort of lifestyle.

Currently Trending

Norman Mooney’s Explosive Burst Sculptures

NYC based artist Norman Mooney makes works that are at once physical and metaphysical. His works explore the elemental and cyclical synergies of nature. Materiality, pattern, scale and experience are key concerns within his practice. Although he works in a wide array of materials his massive burst sculptures are completely jaw dropping. Radiating from every angle these incredible explosions shimmer and shine like a star far off in the galaxy. (via)

Currently Trending