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Matt Hoyle’s BarnumVillians

Gorgeous black and white portraits of circus/sideshow performers by Matt Hoyle.

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Sponsored Post: LG Launches An Ultra Wide Curved MonitorThat Creates 360-Degree Viewing Immersion

Welcome to the future! A time where the good folks at LG have brought you the new 34 inch, 21:9 Curved UltraWide monitor which will surpass your wildest dreams of technology meeting form and function. Not only is this monitor an exquisite piece of design but it pushes the boundaries of how monitors are used by creatives working in film, graphic design, and photography.

As the name implies the LG 21:9 Curved UltraWide monitor is not only a beautifully wide 34-inch screen but it also is curved. This design detail helps viewers see every inch of the 178 degree field of view with ease. Gone are the days of having to daisy chain multiple monitors to one another only to spend hours calibrating colors from one monitor to the next. Now you have QHD resolution 3440×1440 on one immaculate state-of-the-art surface which will allow you to fully immerse yourself in your projects.

If that’s not enough innovation to get you to rush to the stores and pick up the 21:9 Curved UltraWide then maybe the above video will help. Watch it carefully until the end to see how the monitors can be linked together to create a unique 360-degree video experience that’s impossible with any other monitor on the market. Now that’s technological advancement!

 

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R.M. Fischer Soft Works

R.M. Fischer’s sculptures are a mix between Shaman totem poles and folk art sex statues.

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guido bagini’s Fragments of Modernist Furniture And Architecture

With its fantasy spaces that tell of architecture, design, and cultural landscapes, Italian artist Guido Bagini’s  works  play with the powers of collective imagination. His images evade the rules of orthogonal perspective and of gravity, as well. The objects—most of them fragments of modernist furniture and architecture—seem to float freely in abstract compositions, creating an unusual sense of depth. This is underscored by the artist’s ample use of glossy enamel paint on matte, cardboard-colored backgrounds.

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Alexandra Kehayoglou’s Carpets Look Like Lush Pastures and Grasslands

Alexandra Kehayoglou carpet

 Alexandra Kehayoglou

Alexandra Kehayoglou

pastizal-isa

Argentinian artist, Alexandra Kehayoglou creates rugs that look like pastures and meadows. The grassland carpet seeks to mimic the appearance of naturally occurring, but fast disappearing Argentinian landscapes.

Kehayoglou grew up around textile artists, her family followed a textile tradition that was developed thousands of years ago in Asia Minor. After graduating with a degree in visual arts, Kehayoglou returned to her roots making carpets as her ancestors did, but with a twist. As varied as the grasslands and natural scenery of South America, the carpets are beautiful representations of natural and cultural heritage.

Carpet weaving is innate knowledge for me. It makes me feel connected to another time. It is a way of building meanings throughout my life and that of my ancestors.

Her creations carry a strong message of sustainability; these carpets are made from wool often found in mounds of leftover fabrics behind factories. (Via DD.AA.)

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Nude BodiesTransformed Into Flora And Fauna

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Cecelia Webber‘s collage work features tessellated figures and limbs of the human body arranged to form images of plants and animals. Webber photographs nude models – including herself – in various poses before she digitally edits the images, cutting and coloring them to form particular parts of the new image. The final product features different bodies and body parts posed in the same positions. Many of the pieces take months to finish, but the longest image – the rose – took her a year to complete because of how tricky the angles were to capture and arrange. Webber creates an image with such a high resolution that they can be printed up to 6 feet tall, a size that would make the tessellated bodies even more pronounced and captivating.

“Each image takes many stages to create. I start by researching photos of the creature or plant I’m trying to create and then sketch poses I want to photograph in a notebook…I never warp my models or edit them to change them – it is important to me to portray real natural bodies. Once I have my photos I start laying out my piece and playing with colour and arrangements…Many drastic transformations take place during this stage, so it’s sort of magical, because so many different variations are possible. I feel many possibilities at once but the true form of my subject slowly emerges.” (via daily mail)

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Lucy Glendinning’s Strange And Beautiful Feathered Figures

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

British sculptor Lucy Glendinning creates  ‘Feather Child’, a bird-like, human-like  creature. This strange project originates from Glendinning’s fascination with personal visions, expectations and fears about the future of a highly technologically advanced society. ‘Feather Child’, acting as a semiotic medium,  specifically embodies Glendinning’s questions about the future of genetic manipulation in such a world. The feathers, apart from making a point about what a possible genetically manipulated being might look like, are also a reference to the classic tale of human hubris: Greek mythology’s Icarus.

The feathered child begs its spectator to ponder upon the reality of such fantastical but absurd creations in a world where this will most certainly become a possibility. Will we be able to resist altering our physical abilities and looks if we had to ability to change them? Furthermore, will we, like Icarus, defy our abilities, change them, and as a consequence have everything we worked for fall apart?

Time will only tell what the future has in store for us. (via IGNANT)

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Doug Aitken’s Mysterious Sonic Fountain Created In The Middle Of 303 Gallery

doug aitken

doug aitken

doug aitken

Central to Doug Aitken’s “100 YRS” exhibition at 303 Gallery is a new “Sonic Fountain,” in which water drips from 5 rods suspended from the ceiling, falling into a concrete crater dug out of the gallery floor. The flow of water itself is controlled so as to create specific rhythmic patterns that will morph, collapse and overlap in shifting combinations of speed and volume, lending the physical phenomenon the variable symphonic structure of song. The water itself appears milky white, as if imbued and chemically altered by its aural properties, a basic substance turned supernatural. The amplified sound of droplets conjures the arrhythmia of breathing, and along with the pool’s primordial glow, the fountain creates its own sonic system of tracking time.

Behind a cavernous opening carved into the gallery’s west wall is “Sunset (black),” a sculptural work that resembles cast lava rock in texture and spells out the word SUNSET as it glows from behind, its letters forming a relic of the entropy and displacement inherent in the literal idea of a sunset. Viewed from and obscured behind a hole in the wall, the sculpture appears as cosmic debris, as if pulled from a parallel world where a sunset is only an idea, obfuscated by detritus of the age of post-everything, a reductionist standpoint between the modes of pop and minimalism, its glow fading into the next realm. Also on view is the mirrored sculpture “MORE (shattered pour)”. Like a time-piece, the work creates a kaleidoscope of reflections of all that surrounds it. As if it were a fragmented film, “MORE (shattered pour)” creates a literal manifestation of the present and aspirational escapism, which cannot be viewed without glimpsing a piece of one’s self within the work’s reflections. Another refraction of time is glimpsed through “Fountain (Earth Fountain)”, created from plexiglas letters spelling the word “ART”, through which a slurry of moist dirt is pumped, physical earth perpetually redoubling and standing in for itself. The word ART itself subverts the entropy of time, creating a holding pattern that organic matter cannot escape from. The flickering lightbox “not enough time in the day” completes the communicative supercurrent of shimmering malaise, its letters overlapping as if seen inebriated, somehow both more profound and less understandable. The work creates a cycle that is both hypnotic and inescapable. (via)

Watch a video of the show after the jump!

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