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Music Makes Paint Splatter Dance

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Photographer Martin Klimas‘ series “What Does Music Look Like?” is a fun attempt at answering that very question.  He uses paint as a vehicle for sound.  Klimas places brightly colored paints on a surface that sits just above a speaker.  Playing loud music such as Kraftwerk or Miles Davis makes the paint splatter above the speaker  with the vibrations making it “dance”.  The paint jumps and splattes while being captured by the camera.  Klimas snapped approximately 1,000 photographs to capture the set.

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Treasure Frey

Born into a long bloodline of creatives, illustrator Treasure Frey’s work of collage/ drawings is certainly something to watch for. Her work reminds me a lot of the awesome animations from Monty Python, except with the intricate combination of beautiful mark-making with varying line weights, loops, and brightly colored shapes, she has made a killer style of her own.

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Time Travel With Powl Goudsmit

Powl Goudsmit takes you back to the future.

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Sung-Myung Chun

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Korean artist Sung-Myung Chun creates eerie sculptures of young boys wearing his face who are usually in a situation that revolves around drama. He works with his life experiences through these sculptures of himself, and presents it to us cinematically by freezing them in moments of great reflection, violence, fatigue, etc – much like in T.V. shows or movies.

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Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

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The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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Nathan Cyprys

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In Buried, artist Nathan Cyprys’ work is “symbolic of both our unavoidable mortality and [Cyprys’] attempt at rebirth,” according to his artist statement. He also mentions art’s uncanny ability to validate what would otherwise be considered absurd behavior. To regress into favorite childhood games, such as digging holes in the ground and climbing into them. Or should I say progress? Hmm…

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Dan Bradica’s Lansdcapes Altered With Paper And Lights

Dan Bradica lives and works in Chicago. Using extremely basic materials (paper and fluorescent lights) he obscures, highlights, and examines the world around him. An image of stacked cardboard boxes in a field of barren trees becomes a metaphor for the consequences of deforestation. In other work pieces of bright paper take form of apparitions and playfully haunt the scene. These simple alterations reinvigorate the landscape and simultaneously comment on waste, excess, and consumption.

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Lauren King Draws What Lies Outside The Borders Of Vintage Photos

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Lauren King uses vintage photos of landscapes and imagines how to continue the scene. Her drawing extensions – done in graphite – are truly convincing. She creates a space that feels more real than the photo, because it exists outside the borders of the image. A photo retains the image, literally captures it, but King brings the scene back to life and revives it on paper. The most interesting moments are when the image she creates moves subtly from reality, as when she extends the pattern of a bed cover, and the material becomes more like a plant. The photos she uses, mostly postcards, are highly nostalgic. She makes good selections, using atmospheres that are playful or whimsical like her technique. What makes the artwork so successful is her highly skilled rendering; if the images didn’t seem so accurate, they wouldn’t be as fun. What makes them interesting is that, although they seem to complete the image, they could be totally different than what the scene was originally. (Via I Need A Guide)

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