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Reva Castillenti’s Gruesome Textile Sculptures of Open Wounds and Deformed Children

Reva Castillenti is a Brooklyn-based artist who creates gruesome textile sculptures that focus on the gritty, physical side life. “Visceral” is a word that’s often over-used within the lexicon of art-speak, but I think Castillenti’s work merits the description. We’ve all experimented with stuffed stocking figures before, but I’m not sure we’re all as wonderfully twisted as she seems to be. Castillenti is currently showing a small number of works at Illuminated Metropolis Gallery in New York. That show, entitled Mercy, is up until the 29th, and features minimalist drawings and gouache works in addition to the artist’s singular sculpture.

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Paul Windle’s Mid-70’s Baseball Dudes

Mid-seventies basbeall dudes by Brooklyn based illustrator Paul Windle.

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Haris Purnomo Paints Portraits Of An Indonesia Full Of A Painful Past

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Indonesian painter Haris Purnomo started painting babies covered with dragon tattoos over 20 years ago and has slowly included women and men into his oeuvre. Initially starting illustrating babies because “they were cute”, Purnomo quickly realized they could be a effective symbol for the Indonesian lower class. His portraits now include all ages, demographics and classes. Like some sort of branding or gang symbol, the faces he paints all bear a marking of a certain culture. They all belong to the same time and place. Purnomo was a painter during the time of the military dominated government of Suharto and his work shows a certain sort of forced introspection – a focus on pain and mysterious, subtle symbols.

His paintings are highly political as well as highly stylized. As a member of the Gerakan Seni Rupa Bary, The New Art Movement, and of PIPA, two innovative art movements from Indonesia in the seventies, he not only challenged Suharto’s power and the preexisting aesthetic, but also people’s understanding of their own culture. These are his own thoughts on why he produces artwork and it’s social importance:

Once we are faced with the necessity to make a choice or a stand, everything that makes up our backgrounds will play its part: time, age, economic, social and political considerations, idealism, behavior, creativity, et cetera. All these may alter, strengthen, undermine, or develop anything we believe, and the ‘Pipa’ artists are not exceptions in this. As a father seeing his children growing up I experience a sense of losing [sic], I feel the strong drive to give more attention to children, including others’ children; that is what has been going on in me Being hopeful about my children and wanting to be more attentive to children in every aspect, I think these two things provide the basis of the central theme of my works.(Source)

Purnomo’s artworks are not only culturally relevant for Indonesia, but can teach us a whole lot about the human condition, it’s strength, fragility, resilience and adaptability.

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Leonid Tishkov’s Portable Moon Installations

Leonid Tishkov

Leonid Tishkov

Leonid Tishkov

Russian physician turned turned artist Leonid Tishkov’s latest project consists of a portable crescent moon photographed in nostalgic and sentimental scenes all over the world. Creating images in china, new zealand, taiwan, the arctic, France and beyond, Tishkov’s global ongoing project tells the story of ” a man who met the moon and stayed with her forever.” (via)

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Incredibly Detailed QR Code Carpet Drawings

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Created by art director Jonathan Bréchignac, Joe and Nathan is a design studio based in Paris. These incredible carpet drawings were all hand drawn with Bic pencils and pens. Meant to reflect the size of Muslim prayer carpets, these meticulous works are rich in pattern and detail. Inspired by different types of art (French roman, traditional Japanese, native American and Mexican) and also military camouflage and animal patterns, Bréchignac combines these patterns and genres and breathes new meaning to each of these forms while creating something completely new and unique. If you look closely, you can identify a hand drawn QR code in the four corners of each carpet. Each code is related its own page on thecarpet.net. This detail relates the physical form of the carpet to an abstracted and interactive virtual form, adding a whole new dimension to these amazing two dimensional illustrations. (via my amp goes to 11)

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Minimalist Prints Of State Insignia – Strange And Otherwise

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Julian Montague design1

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Perhaps you may be familiar with your state motto or state bird.  However, what about your state amphibian or state grain?  America’s fifty states have many official state insignia, some more obscure than others.  Artist and designer Julian Montague highlights many of these for all of the states in the union in his new series State of America.  While some state insignia may be predictable – Idaho’s official state food is the potato – others are bit stranger such as Georgia’s official state fossil: shark teeth.

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David Cristobal Replaces Skin With Wood In His Compelling Portraits

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David Cristobal creates portraits of people with skin like wood texture. The wood knots and grain form to the shapes of the different faces and create these kind of human tree spirits. I’m reminded of some kind of modern day lord of the rings tree incarnations. It’s impressive how well Cristobal can combine the texture of the wood and relates it to the shape of the face.

The portrait I’m most drawn to is where there is a large hole in the wood where the eyes would be. In the majority of the portraits, the face is left wholly intact and the wood is more of a veneer. In this portrait, it seems to engage more with the form of the face, and you imagine it more as a sculptural element. This happens again with the women who is missing almost the entire left half of her face, but it’s most successful with the eye-less man. Perhaps this is because eyes are the most revealing element of a face, and the gap reveals the inner depths of the head, whereas with the woman it seems more as if a piece of her face has simply been removed.

The woman with large dark eyes whose head ends like an open tree stump is also exceptionally compelling. Obviously because of her eyes, but I believe also because once again an essential element of a complete head, this time the hair, is gone. Excluding an entire element seems preferable to me than excluding an arbitrary portion of the face. The portraits are a lovely combination of nature and humanity, especially when Cristobal finds good balance between the two. (Via Scene 360)

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Eric Cahan And The Science Of Light

 

Intrigued by the power and nostalgia of Nature, New York based artist Eric Cahan has been devoting his time to long journeys, willing to observe and study the behavior of sun light and its impact on earth.

Cahan´s main project “Sky Series” invites you to get absorbed by unique shots of the sunrise and sunset, enigmatic and mysterious pieces titled only by location and time. Each photography is a visual and spiritual souvenir that captures a magic hour, a perfect and harmonious glow of natural light.

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