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Interview: Drew Beckmeyer

I Don't Believe In Anything But This Is Transcendent

I Don't Believe In Anything But This Is Transcendent

Drew Beckmeyer creates quirky paintings that fuse visuals from different times and spaces, often pairing unexpected scenes with seemingly personal and historical references. They are both charming and mysterious works that teeter between whimsical and ominous. Beautiul/Decay recently interviewed Drew regarding his process, and even took a sneak peak at his studio behind the scenes.

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Romain Laurent’s Urban Scenarios

Paris based Romain Laurent’s striking photographs blend surreal poetics with uncanny humor to create complex and unlikely urban scenarios full of quirky narratives.

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Pinar Yoldas

UROGENITAL FOLDS


UROGENITAL FOLDS

Pinar Yoldas is a designer, artist, architect, and organic chemistry enthusiast. Her work is a reflection of her interests in neuroscience, evolution, gender studies and science fiction. In her work she explores new materials and new production tools in order to blend conventional media with digital media. I remember seeing these sculpture/organisms (often resembling the female anatomy) at the UCLA Design | Media Arts (both of our alma maters) 2nd Year grad show Exit Strategies. I was significantly and equal parts titillated and fascinated at these creatures, seemingly inanimate yet surreal-y possessing life like qualities. We’re also throwing a fundraiser party for her injuries and medical bills from multiple biking related accidents tonight in Echo Park (come come!). Check out the flyer after the jump!

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David R Harper Embroiders The Void Of Death

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David R Harper’s artwork is about the projection or imposition of meaning on an object, especially concerning memorial in death. He embroiders over taxidermy animals on prints of still life paintings from the 18th century. He sees the dead animals as a human way of addressing mortality; feeling empathy for the dead animal, but also as a way of avoiding grappling with our own inevitable demise. The embroidery creates a void or emptiness, especially literal in the white thread, and more dynamic but equally vacant with the use of green patterning in The Fall. Thread operates in most cases as a cold medium and Harper employs it extremely effectively in combination with his meticulous technique.

His most ambitious work is titled I Tried, and I Tried, and I Tried, presumably a quasi-reference to the Rolling Stones song (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, as well as Napoleon’s conquests. Harper embroiders the entire horse of David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps. In the original artwork the horse is mostly white with black on its tail and head, where Harper creates a gradient that transforms from black to light grey. What is truly incredible is that this process doesn’t flatten the horse; it retains its form in the sculpting of the flow of the thread. The beast becomes much more powerful and haunting

Art Info has a great slideshow that compares Harper’s sculpture and embroidery work to other well-known artists. See it here.

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Amazing Hand Cut Paper Pairs Illustration With Incredible Technique

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Artist Maude White combines her gorgeous illustrative skills with intricate paper cutting expertise to create incredible paper work creations. A self-taught artist, she credits her Waldorf education and artistic family for encouraging her to create.

“I am influenced by my mother’s art a great deal. When I was little she would make wool felt playscapes — little scenes of a tree stump in a forest-covered in plants and animals, a small garden scene with vegetables and apple trees, a playscape for the story The Three Billy Goats Gruff. It was these types of small, precious, complete worlds that drew me to working with paper.” (Source)

Using an X-Acto knife she cuts each piece by hand slicing away the negative space to make elegant figures with fantastic hidden scenes and stories laced into the designs. “It may sound weird, but I love to cut. I just enjoy the process,” she said in an interview.

White’s paper cutting technique is almost unbelievable—the fine lines and elaborate detail are incredibly impressive. What gives these pieces their charm, though, are the whimsical drawings and ornamental designs. They would be lovely drawn on paper, but the delicacy of the paper, the cast shadows, and the ability to look through the empty spaces make these pieces captivating.

“When I cut paper, I feel as if I am peeling back the outer, superficial layer of our vision to reveal the secret space beneath. With paper cutting there are so many opportunities to create negative space that tells its own story. Letting the observer become present in the piece allows him or her to look through it. … I am not creating for Art’s sake. I am creating for Paper’s sake, to make visible the stories that every piece of paper attempts to communicate to us.” (via booooooom)

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Artists Who Use Body Painting To Create Stunning Images

Jean Paul Bourdier

Jean Paul Bourdier

Jean Paul Bourdier

Jean Paul Bourdier

Emma Hack

Emma Hack

Alexa Meade

Alexa Meade

Body painting is a tedious, but amazing process with stunning results.  Incorporating the technique in unique ways, each of these three artists captures beautiful and poetic images after applying paint to skin.

California-based photographer Jean-Paul Bourdier combines the human form with landscape to create a unique visual synchronization.  Painting the bodies, posing them just so, and taking the photographs, Bourdier explains that, “arising in each visual event conceived are the geometries generated by the body as a determinant of ‘negative space’—not the background of the figure and the field surrounding it, but the space that makes composition and framing possible in photography.”

Incorporating what is largely traditional painting, Alexa Meade also uses the unique canvas that is the human body.  Painting directly onto the skin, Meade creates a trompe l’leil that is wholly unusual.  Camouflaging her figures into the background Meade creates optically engaging images that confuse 3D and 2D planes.

Australia-based artist Emma Hack combines painting on canvas, body painting and studio-based photography.  Hack’s works incorporates rich visual narrative with magical realism.  Also interested in the idea of camouflage, Hack spends approximately 19 hours painting her wallpaper and then anywhere from 8-15 hours painting her subject to throughly explore the subject.  The arduous process is time-consuming, but the results are spectacular.

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A Behind The Scenes Glimpse into Installing Famous Works Of Art

 

Have you ever walked into a gallery or museum and wondered “How did they ever install that giant sculpture or painting?” Well  WRAPIT-TAPEIT-WALKIT-PLACEIT comes to the rescue with a collection of amazing behind the scenes shots of gallery assistants and museum installers moving, assembling, and dissembling all your favorite works of art. Go through their deep archives or submit your own behind the scenes images and share what it takes to make art magic happen. (via)

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Mark Alsweiler Has Some Crazy Paintings

Mark Alsweiler has some new work out and it’s just as intriguing as his last. Each piece is eerie, full of color and texture, and references a different time. I love the pilgrim like characters who seem to have wandered into a different dimension. His work shows people doing normal tasks in this disappearing, melting atmosphere. I’m excited to see what’s up next for this talented gent.

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