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Photographs of Cancer Patients Reactions When They See Their Humorous Makeovers For The First Time

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Photographer Vincent Dixon and the Mimi Foundation ( a non-profit that helps cancer patients to deal with their condition), join forces to produce ‘If only for a Second’, a poignant book-project that includes the portraits of 20 cancer patients under a positive light.

The participating men and women were asked to keep their eyes closed during their makeover, a step that they weren’t really aware of; they thought it was just procedure for the photo-shoot. They were not expecting to see what they saw later.

The last step of the process entailed the 20 cancer patients and a mirror (a two-way mirror which was hiding photographer Vincent Dixon behind it).

They were asked to open their eyes to see themselves. The surprise they got from the hilarious makeovers clearly shows on their faces- Dixon, behind the mirror, took photographs of their first reaction- a moment of joy, amusement and surprise.

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Sex, Murder, And Satan!

Hide yo kids, hide yo wife!

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B/D Apparel Spring/Summer 2009 Lookbook

Beautiful/Decay recently created a lookbook for our Spring/Summer 09 seasons. The concept behind the shoot juxtaposes evocative objects & optical affects with our apparel, to complement the shirts in abstract ways. Still life images of disco balls, prismatic rings, shag carpets and balloons contrast the light, color and texture of the shirt graphics. See our apparel line come to life in new and unexpected ways! Photography by Luke Stettner.

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Istvan Sandorfi’s Hyperrealistic Paintings Of Vanishing, Ghost-Like Bodies

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Istvan Sandorfi (1948-2007) was a Hungarian painter known for his hyperrealistic oil paintings of cloth-draped and vanishing figures. In his works, pale skin melds with the surrounding atmosphere, and bodies embrace and pull apart from one another, twisting in silent expressions of pain. Engrossed amidst states of transfiguration, Sandorfi’s “incomplete” characters exhibit both profound vulnerability and strength.

From detailed facial expressions to the minute details of wrinkles and bones beneath flesh, the paintings bear a photorealistic effect that is troubled by a fragmentary surrealism suggestive of digital manipulation. Such meticulousness came from Sandorfi’s never-ending dedication to the craft of painting, which he did mostly alone and at night. As he himself humbly claimed, “I never had the impression that I really knew how to paint, not in the past, not now. If you paint, you are simply never satisfied” (Source).

Sandorfi’s ghostly images have been shown on display around Europe for the last three decades. His works remain in several private collections and museums around the world, including the Centre Georges Pompidou, Musee de la Ville de Paris, and the Taiwan Museum of Art (Source).  As a master of his medium who could replicate and expressively unmake the human body, Sandorfi’s oeuvre is one that deserves ongoing appreciation. His work can be followed on Facebook. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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Stunning Cut Paper Sculptures By Maud Vantours

Cut Paper Sculptures By Maud Vantours

Cut Paper Sculptures By Maud Vantours

Cut Paper Sculptures By Maud Vantours

Cut Paper Sculptures By Maud Vantours

French designer Maud Vantours creates astoundingly detailed works of art from finely cut paper; carving out perfect geometric and organic shapes, she layers page upon page to create deep cavernous holes and intricate surfaces. With paper patterns of midnight blue and desert yellow, she constructs mesmerizing spaces, strange and wondrous terra incognitae, or lands unknown. Flowers sink like caves below the topmost surfaces; gray parallelograms, like mounds of be achy sand, are emerge from the page.

Vantours’s transfixing images catch and trick the eye, which is accustomed to viewing artwork on a single plane; her works exists in a space all its own, caught between sculpture and line. The work is made both from peeling away and adding layers, and we view it like a vibrant onion, unsure of where it begins or where it might end. Colorful, ever-brightening concentric circles seem infinite, and repeated, detailed surface patterns resemble complex cathedral windows. Blue and orange or green and pink, being opposite colors, visual pull apart from one another, creating an illusion of even greater depth within the thin pages.

From a medium as simple as paper, Vantours renders a dreamy world where organic and mathematically precise shapes are celebrated and fully explored. These deceptively effortless collages are a testament to the order of the natural world; neatly aligned, bright and neutral colors emerge from the shadows. Single and double-layered cut-outs occlude one another, forming complex visual structures that necessitate our attention and captivate our imaginations. Take a look. (via Demilked)

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Collection Of Haunting Vintage Halloween Photos From 1875–1955 Will Give You The Chills

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Ossian Brown is an English artist and musician whose book “Haunted Air” gives us a rare glimpse at the vintage celebration of Halloween in America, c. 1875-1955. Anonymous photographs collected from family albums depict the traditional macabre costumes from ages past.

“I find their haunting melancholy completely absorbing; all of these photographs <…> now torn out, disembodied and forgotten <…> they’ve now become fully and utterly the masks and phantoms they dragged up as, all those years ago.”

Compared to today’s flashy, pop-culture inspired Halloween costumes, these get ups of are capable of giving viewer the chills. Black and white photographs feature children and adults dressed with strange DIY masks and robes. Popular motifs contain disguising as devils, witches or animals.

According to Brown, he was fascinated by the wild imagination of these people who at the time were living in great poverty but still managed to create “these incredible and phantasmagorical apparitions”. From whatever inanimate objects, they would construct truly haunting costumes and kept with the essence of tradition which is overlooked nowadays.

To give the book even more mystery, the foreword was written by David Lynch. A short excerpt presented here:

“All the clocks had stopped. A void out of time. And here they are – looking out and holding themselves still – holding still at that point where two worlds join – the familiar – ant the other.”

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Goto Atsuko’s Ethereal Paintings Are A Zombie Fairytale Come To Life

Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments

Imagine Lolita has joined the cast of The Walking Dead and found a meadow to hide in, and you will get Japanese artist Goto Atsuko’s incredible paintings. They are a mixture between something incredibly sweet and innocent, and something deadly poisonous that features only in nightmares. Her work features sullen, melancholic girls with large eyes and awkward features, and an overload of flowers, leaves, bees, butterflies, ribbons and bows. It’s like a cross between a Tim Burton animation, zombie profiling, and a child’s dark fairytale – all top of with a serving of strawberries and cream.

Compiled from cotton, glue, pigments, gum arabic and lapis lazuli, Atsuko uses both mundane and precious materials – again stressing the contrast between good and bad; naughty and nice. Atsuko’s paintings are a beautiful, haunting combination of childhood and adulthood, and how the two can exist together harmoniously. She shows us everything is not as simple as it seems, maybe that we all have a complicated persona – we are troubled one minute, and celebrating life with the animal kingdom the next. To see more profiles of her beautiful heavenly-devil-children-creatures, see her website here. (Via Booooooom)

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Mariell Amélie’s Surreal Self-Portraits Are A Bit Like Playing With An Imaginary Friend

Mariell Amélie - Photography

Mariell Amélie - Photography

Mariell Amélie - Photography

Mariell Amélie - Photography

Photographer Mariell Amélie‘s self-portraits are a bit like playing with an imaginary friend on the borderlands of fantasy and reality. They transport her to a dreamy limbo state, each looking like a snapshot from some noir-ish modern fairy tale. Some are haunting, others playful, but all have a sheen of melancholy, an icy veneer. This sensibility is perhaps explained partially by Amélie’s biography, which places her childhood on “a small island above the arctic circle.” A wind-blown isolation permeates her photography, no matter if the backdrop is breath-taking iceberg mountains or bright dollhouse interiors.

Her self-portraits are enigmatic. They are, to borrow a phrase from science, a bit of “spooky action at a distance” — in one, she contemplates her skates on a puddle-sized ice rink; in another, she pays no heed to the warnings of Narcissus, leaning down to kiss the marsh waters. The latter photograph is called “Part Time Lover.” All of Amélie’s photographs have similarly suggestive names: “She Had Just Left for Heaven, They Said,” is the name of one; “Alone and Unaware” is the name of another. As she tumbles from the driver’s seat of a car, vacant-eyed, the photograph’s name comments, “Someone Will Be Waiting at the Station.” These names, paired with the in media res nature of her photographs, give the unshakable feeling that there’s more to the story than meets the eye. If only it were possible to look beyond the veil.

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