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The Direct And Poetic Installations of Adel Abdessemed

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The work of artist Adel Abdessemed is at once direct and poetic.  He often uses common imagery and objects as a point of departure.  However, the mundane beginnings of these objects only further underscore the weighty nature of his art.  Abdessemed’s installations are able to provoke a sudden impact of its viewer.  Still, the installations communicate complex ideas that unfold over extended viewing.  At times controversial, his work is effective in piquing thought and discussion.

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Jess de Wahls Uses Recycled Fabric In Colorful Portraits Of Inspirational Women

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo (detail)

Dr. Ronx

Dr. Ronx

Jess de Wahls is a London-based artist whose colorful multilayered and multifaceted textile works incorporate feminism, gender equality as well as recycling. Using a variety of fabrics, beads, and other materials, she creates 3D portraits that depict strong, inspirational women of all ages, shapes, and ethnicities. She sees her pieces as a way to raise awareness of gender inequality, explaining to TextileArtist.org, “…all the while celebrating great minds and artists of the past and present.

In her artist statement, de Wahls also goes on to say:

Their influence on myself as a modern woman, Feminist and Artist, on Feminism as a whole and on their position as Role models to young girls growing up in a society that has, no doubt, come a long way in liberating its women but has yet a great length ahead of it. Not to mention the work that needs to be done in other parts of our planet, where women are to date still oppressed, belittled and generally treated as second class humans.

So, by creating these pieces, she ensures that their legacy isn’t forgotten.

De Wahls unique style is the product of a self-made called Retex which is short for recycled textile sculpture. She explains:

For the medium of Retex Sculpting, old garments serve as fabric for the works and cushion filler  helps me to create a relief that raises the silhouette off the canvas creating greater depth.
The box-frame, in which the work is mounted, is integral to the piece and can be seen as a modern day relic box. (Via TextileArtist.org)

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Impossibly Tiny Foods Made Of Clay

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Kim Burke’s miniature food sculptures are so realistic you’ll want to eat them in one bite. Inspired by the photorealist movement, Burke creates flawless dollhouse-scale meals from actual photographs, positioned at various angles for maximum accuracy. Each plate of food, so small as to be balanced on a human fingertip, is carefully rendered from clay using needles, razor blades, and a rock for texture. Chalk pastels add color. For cake frosting, Burke uses Translucent Liquid Sculpey mixed with solid clay. The artist’s company, Fairchild Art, offers a range of plates, from sweet to savory dishes, each at a 1:12 scale.

Burke’s passion for dollhouse accessories began as a hobby in 2008, but soon blossomed into what she calls an “obsession.” The work is painstaking and each piece typically requires one to three hours of full concentration, but the result is well worth it. She says of her process, “every time I make something new I always try to add something extra to make it even look more real.”

Decadent and indulgent, Burke’s tiny masterpieces combine the sensuousness of a Caravaggio painting with the whimsy of childhood play. Like Caravaggio’s Still Life with Fruit, each piece is entirely inedible yet invites a mouthwatering appetite. Burke’s delicate fruit baskets emerge like Eden’s forbidden fruit in miniature, igniting the imagination and uninhibited delight. Poignantly small, they remind us of the preciousness of our humanity. When seen on a plate the size of a penny, the most familiar food stuffs become miraculous and spellbinding. Made with tender love and care, the diminutive plates suggest our own fragilities and vulnerabilities. Take a look. (via Demilked)

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Judith Schaechter’s Macabre And Dramatic Stained Glass Windows

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Even though Judith Schaechter was immersed in her artistic career as a painter, she was drawn to the traditional practice of stained glass window making. She has managed to lift the centuries-old skill into the world of contemporary art by treating it with a new vision. She turns something that is usually associated with stuffy old churches into something macabre, tragic, yet beautiful. Schaechter says she doodles in front of the TV, and in meetings, to come up with a preliminary design, but still works spontaneously and improvises until she reaches the final stage.It seems she is quite happy to let accidents and mishaps guide her hand. She speaks a bit more the art of turning something gruesome and unpleasant into a thing of wonder:

It seems my work is centered on the idea of transforming the wretched into the beautiful in theme as well as design. For me, this means taking what is typically negative — say, unspeakable grief, unbearable sentimentality, or nerve-wracking ambivalence, and representing it in such a way that it is inviting and safe to contemplate and captivating to observe (to avoid ending with preposition) (Source)

Schaechter says glass is the perfect medium to support the conceptual idea of transforming ugly and difficult subjects into radiant, transparent, glowing figures. Ordinary, ‘earthly’ beings are now ‘supernatural’ and elevated.

They seem to be caught in a transitional moment when despair becomes hope or darkness becomes inspiration. They seem poised between the threshold of everyday reality and epiphany, caught between tragedy and comedy. (Source)

She is a firm believer of the power of stained glass windows – and the effect they can have on somebody’s mood. To be further enlightened, see more of her work after the jump.(Via Hi Fructose)

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Shih-Mao

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I know virtually nothing about “Shih-Mao” except that he is from Taiwan and he is male (thank you, Flickr profile). His illustrations are fantastic, often depicting some kind of twisted alternate dimension where everything is incredibly weird and visceral.

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Susan Kare

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Susan Kare User Interface Graphics is a digital design practice in San francisco, California. Susan is a pioneer as a computer iconographer. She began her career at Apple, Inc. as the screen graphics and digital font designer for the original Macintosh computer. She feels that “good icons should be more like road signs than illustrations, easily comprehensible, and not cluttered with extraneous detail.” Kare graduated from Mount Holyoke College and received MA and Ph.D. degrees from New York University. Pretty sweet.

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Billowing Cloud Sculpture Represents The Amount Of Trash Accumulated In NYC In One Hour

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From afar, it’s unclear what this billowing, cloud-like sculpture is made of. Up close, however, you can see that it’s comprised of various plastic bottles that are strung together in round, pleasing shape. New York-based architects and designers  STUDIO KCA collected a combination of one gallon jugs, 16 and 24-ounce bottles and compiled them into this ethereal, massive structure. In total, the installation titled Head in the Clouds  is made from 53,780 containers to represent the amount of trash that’s thrown away in New York City in just one hour.

Beneath the cloud’s exterior is a small seating/dreaming pavilion that accommodates up to 50 people. It’s meant for visitors to contemplate the light and color filtering through the cloud, as well as our consumption problem and the impact on the environment. Sand, water, and a curved aluminum frame prove the structural integrity.

Head in the Clouds made its debut last year on New York’s Governor’s Island. The stay was temporary, and the studio is now looking for its next home. (Via Colossal)

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Social Decadence

Immortilized vapid party pictures of ridiculousness by Leah Tinari. Her exhibit opens at Mixed Greens this weekend.

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