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Romain Laurent’s Absurd And Laugh-Out-Loud Animated Portraits Will Make Your Day

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If you are hating your Monday morning, do yourself and favor and looks through these gifs- they will make your day! Not only will they make you laugh, but you will also relate to them.  I’m sure you are slapping your face away on your way to work this morning. Wake up, sleepy !

These ironic, hilarious, and surreal animated portraits are part of commercial photographer Romain Laurent‘s photography challenge. Laurent’s desire to break the routine (of working on commercial photography) ended up on a quest to create silly-looking looped animated portrait each week since last September. He says the bizarre and often laugh-out-loud experiments are a low-pressure way to experiment and be creative without expectations.

“As far as the intention of the series, it’s a way for me to explore a hybrid medium, experiment and being spontaneous while still sticking to a short weekly deadline. There isn’t a common concept between each loop, I just ‘go with the flow’ and see what comes to my mind each week.”

You can keep up with Laurent’s weekly animated portraits on his Tumblr. (via Colossal)

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The Wind Passages of Magnus Sönning Bring The Outside Indoors

The site specific installations of Magnus Sönning investigate space and the structures that inhabit it.  In a way, his Wind Passages bring the outside indoors.  The small raised corridors allow the wind (and at times rain) to flow right through a building.  His work emphasizes the space that we live in.  It encourages us to think about the world prior to the existence of the the structures of everyday life.  Other works of Sönning take pieces of buildings – ceilings, floors, walls – out of context and puts them on display.  These pieces create further opportunities to investigate structures we simply pass through each day.

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Anika Lori’s Psychedelic Collage Madness

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Welcome to the psychedelic dream world of Anika Lori. Prepare to enter an alternative dimension of visual overload.

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Nelson Balaban

XTCNelson Balaban is an illustrator/designer working in Sao Paulo. At 20 years of age, he has worked with some impressive clients including Adidas, Diesel, Coca-Cola, and Oakley. He is now the art director working for Cisma @ Paranoid BR. For a bigger list of his clients and more of his work check out his site or follow him on the Behance network.

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Jelle Martens

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Digital photo collages and a pencil sketch by artist Jelle Martens.  These remind me of much cooler versions of landscape prints my grandma has in her house above a couch.

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Jenine Shereos’ Creates Beautifully Intricate Spiderwebs Out Of Lace

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Boston-based artist Jenine Shereos who we’ve featured in the past for her amazing series of leaves made from human hair.  her amazing series of leaf forms made from human hair. Her more recent work revisits the idea of human-manipulated nature with “De/constructed Lace,” a site-specific installation series of knit-lace that mimics spiderwebs.

In Marnay-Sur-Seine, France she draped the knit threads in windows and doorways, looking like massive, delicate spiderwebs, echoing the white lace curtains in many local homes. The works are not perfect, Charlotte’s Web creations, but looser, more organic forms. Shereos says on her website:

“This installation of knit-lace is suspended in a state of unraveling. The process of its making and unmaking are one and the same.”

In Boston, she worked with black thread and crystals, allowing her web-like art to cast filigreed shadows on the wall amid flickering rainbows from the hanging crystal. The webs are more ominous in black, connecting to walls and windows and floor with fine strands.

“Some of these site-specific works are installed for a period of weeks for viewers to interact with, and others function as a sort of ephemeral, private performance existing afterwards in documentation. Oftentimes, collaborations intended or unintended arise within the environment; a spider spins its delicate webs from the white strands of thread suspended in an unraveling knit curtain, fibrous fragments of seaweed become embedded within a structure of knit fibers, or an array of rainbows flicker amidst white walls and black curtains.”

By co-opting the aesthetics of the natural world, Shereos creates a conscious interaction with the structure of the landscape or the architecture surrounding her art, uniting real and surreal, natural and constructed, fluidity and stillness.

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Heroin Chic- High-Fashion Photo Shoot Of Russian Prostitutes

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While the term “heroin chic” emerged in the 1990s as a droll description of the trendy androgyny and grungy-yet-glamorous look of contemporaneous supermodels, artists Loral Amir and Gigi Ben Artzi present the expression through a literal lens with their series, Downtown Divas.

Comprised of a short film and photographic series, Downtown Divas presents heroin-addicted Russian prostitutes as they don designer clothing and pose for a reimagined fashion spread. Juxtaposing bruised legs, tired eyes, and aloof expressions with luxury materials, trendy ensembles, and elegant silhouettes, the striking photographs appear disjointed and disconcerting. Though aesthetically startling and indicative, they paint a very different picture from the corresponding short film. Comprised of candid interviews, the poignant film surprisingly does not focus on each woman’s hardships; Amir and Artzi sought, rather, to “show a different side of the women and ignore that ‘drug addict’ tag that they carry around” (Bullett). By strictly avoiding questions regarding their drug use or experiences as sex workers, Amir and Artzi are able to instead focus on unseen—and often ignored—aspects of the women’s lives, including recurring dreams, childhood aspirations, lost loves, and favorite colors.

While many applaud Downtown Divas as a critique of the fashion industry and its apparent glamorization of drug addiction, contrary claims of exploitation and questions of the subjects’ ability—or inability—to consent have also emerged. Thus, while seemingly intended as a means to humanize the women, many hold that it instead achieves the exact opposite by exploiting them and taking advantage of their apparent afflictions and unwell mental states.

After viewing the photos and watching the video, what do you think of Downtown Divas? Humanizing social commentary, or exploitative agenda? (via Feature Shoot)

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Amazing Photos Of Japan Earthquake

We wanted to take a moment and share some of these amazing (and horrifying) photographs that The Atlantic posted of the Japan earthquake and Tsunami. Our friends out there are still putting back the pieces and we want you to join us in sending lots of positive vibes and wish them a speedy recovery. Since we’re in a “Sending” mood  why don’t we also reach into our wallets and send a few bucks to the Red Cross to help in the relief. You can fill out a quick form on the Red Cross site or just text 9099 to make a $10 donation. More photos after the jump.

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