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Jeremy Willis

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Jeremy Willis had me over to his Brooklyn studio and we hung out and talked about his paintings.  Willis describes the paintings anthropomorphically – as wanting to be doing something human, like giving birth, hugging you or selling you illicit substances.  The majority of the paintings are big and surround you with saturated colors and chaotic space.  They do feel like they have an overwhelming emotional content, and the paintings reflect the messy nature of life.  Look for more from Jeremy soon.

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Design Watch: Mr. & Mr.

French Design firm Mr. & Mr. reinterpreted  da Vinci’s Last Supper into a clever series of table runners and place mats. The hand gestures are in the exact postion and in the same ratio as the original. Next time you have friends over for dinner where will you sit? Watch out for Judas!

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Brent Owens Woodcarvings Walk The Line Between Art And Craft

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Walking the line between fine art and craft, Brent Owens has a characteristic style of woodworking that he incorporates with a somewhat irreverent sense of humor and applies to a myriad of subjects.  Conspicuously hand-carved, embracing the flaws and all, Owens enhances his imperfect look by selecting wood with notable imperfections.  The casual woodwork is not a comment on Owens’ talents.  Rather it is done to emphasize the fact that the human hand has influenced the material.  Conceptually, Owens works from the notion that humans have a tendency to render nature amenable to their own agenda.  Describing this “healthy disrespect for nature” as a “shameless manipulation of a gorgeous natural material,” Owens considers his woodworking to be “imposing his own desires on the material” in the name of progressing culture.

Owens’ exploration of craft takes him in several directions.  His “Turkish rugs,” for instance, are carved freehand and modeled after Googled images.  These works are juxtaposed with carved paintings of appropriated text of medical queries and responses, which have been translated from Chinese to English.  The results are a mix of park signage and conceptual art exhibited as a confused mix of words that have lost the nuance of human translation.  The works becomes symbolic of how epically the human desire to understand and control everything so often fails.

Both funny and frightening Owens’ works are ultimately a representation of the fact that craft as fine art becomes a commentary on fine art itself.  Thereby becoming commentary on culture, and human nature at large.

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Ave Pildas’ Nostalgic Photographs Capture The Lively Characters Of Hollywood Boulevard During The 1970s

Teenagers Bus Bench -©1974

Bus Bench – Teenagers ©1974

Halloween - Trannies ©1974

Halloween – Trannies ©1974

People on Stars - Sundance Massage ©1973

People on Stars – Sundance Massage ©1973

Halloween - KKK ©1974

Halloween – KKK ©1974

Bus Bench - Jesus ©1974

Bus Bench – Jesus ©1974

In a series of black-and-white photographs taken between the years of 1973 and 1975, Ave Pildas provides a fascinating glimpse into how, over the span of four decades, the streets and people of Hollywood Boulevard have both changed and remained curiously the same. Pildas moved from Ohio to Los Angeles in 1971, when Capitol Records hired him to design album covers and take pictures of talent. After 6 months, Pildas left to begin his own design company called Plug In and embark on his Hollywood Boulevard project.

“This place is incredible,” Pildas said when we spoke over the phone. “People escaping the winter [and] US tourists lean towards the west — and all the nuts roll towards the west as well, stopping short of the ocean in Hollywood.” Intrigued by these people who came seeking adventure (and perhaps fame in movies and music), Pildas began to collect their portraits. “My style is to interact with people,” he said, explaining his approach. He would wait until an unknown person would walk into the light, engage with them, and then request to take their picture. Some people would pose and smile, and others would hold up their hands in rejection. “For the most part, I was treated well,” Pildas said in good humor.

Among the images you will see a whole cast of characters posing excitedly (or reluctantly) for the camera. There are apathetic teenagers at the bus stop, suave fashionistas, a chef, and, rather controversially, two people dressed up as KKK members for Halloween. In comparison to present-day street photography, which favors strong contrasts, Pildas would minimize shadows by shooting on overcast days. The result is a collection of images that are nostalgic as well as beautifully muted and almost surreal in appearance.

While some of the images look a bit dated (such as the cavalier and inappropriate attitudes of the KKK Halloween-goers), they also show how some things haven’t changed. “The costumes have changed,” Pildas observed, referring to how the fashion has inevitably shifted over the decades — but many things persist. He talked about what could still be seen: the Broadway Building, as well as the variety of restaurants, head shops, trashy lingerie stores, Scientologists, and street people hanging out. What has remained fundamentally the same is the adventurous and eclectic spirit that characterizes Hollywood Boulevard.

In an exhibition titled Hollywood Boulevard: The 70s — which opened at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) on July 1st and runs until September 13th — Pildas has compiled an exciting collection of 51 photographs from the series. The images are made from scans of the original negatives, some of which hadn’t been seen in forty years and required repair. By opening the images to the public, Pildas offers a delightful journey into the lively history of Hollywood Boulevard and its people. Check out his website and Facebook page to learn more.

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Grzegorz Gwiazda’s 19th Century Inspired Classic Nudes Use Hints Of Color And Abstraction To Catch Your Eye

Grzegorz Gwiazda - Mixed MediaGrzegorz Gwiazda - Mixed Media

Grzegorz Gwiazda - Mixed Media

Grzegorz Gwiazda - Mixed Media

The curious artwork of Grzegorz Gwiazda breaks down form and structure, yet often builds up color and shape. His sculptures range from a wide variety of style, whether it is representational, surreal, or incredibly abstract. Reminiscent of 19th century European sculptures, his work has a timeless quality that demands respect and appreciation. However, there is always an unmistakable contemporary element present in each piece. For example, one of Gwiazda’s sculptures appears to be a classic, male nude made out of bronze. However, this man is also riding a unicycle, and even has one red foot. Another striking piece holds his arms out in a traditional stance, also nude. This sculpture contains a brilliant blue stripe dissecting the man in half, while several shades of vibrant colors fanning across the background in which he stands. The artist beautifully takes 19th century motifs and style and majestically brings them into contemporary times; into the avant garde.

Not all of Gwiazda’s sculptures display realistically sculpted, male nudes. Many of them break down the figure, melting their details and characteristics until, sometimes; they are nothing but a skeleton of a man. His multiplicity in styles is as impressive as his eclectic us of media. He uses more common materials like bronze and ceramic, but also uses more obscure ones like resin and paper. The artist is able to create such magnificent form and detail, with just enough abstraction to push male nude sculpture to the next level.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Roman Is As Roman Does

blue and red creatures, bad dental hygiene, and ambitious cupcake eating can all be found in Anticon recording artists Themselves music video, Roman Is As Roman Does. Video directed by Yu Sato.

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Paola de Grenet’s “Albino Beauty”

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I came across photographer Paola de Grenet’s photo series, “Albino Beauty,” today. Her figures are ethereally beautiful, almost sculptural.

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Alicia Martin Lopez’s Nightmarish Paintings Imagine Our Inner Demons, Secret Fears

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The artist Alicia Martin Lopez gives form to her emotional demons through her darkly seen paintings; imagining the shapes and tones of oft-repressed memories and desires, her work dares to plunge into the depths of human fear. With their infinitely cavernous black eyes, Lopez’s disquietingly amorphous characters invite viewers into the nightmarish dreamscape of our own psychological narratives.

Lopez’s frightful beings inhabit a space outside the confines of time; day and night blur together as light pours in and leaks out of the scene without cause. The monsters are wildly unbound, floating in midair, drifting on water, or holding desperately to rock formations, toes clinched with uncertainty. Like thoughts that flood the darkest corners of the human psyche, the beasts may appear at any time in any place, haunting the mind’s eye without warning.

As soon as they rear their heads, however, the creatures are woefully repressed; one octopus-like animal sits confined in a cell, his crooked neck craning to accommodate a sickly grey face. Like our own private demons, Lopez’s creatures are starved of attention and psychic nourishment, kept bottled in the murky depths of subconscious memory. They each stare downward as if collapsed by the space above them, their bodies bracing against the weight of repression. A flying squid’s wings appear as if crushed by exhaustion; sea creatures’ bearded faces droop into impossibly still water, their sorrowful expressions reflected back at them.

These animals are a tangible reminder of memories and sufferings that refuse to stay buried; collapsing in upon themselves, they beg for our recognition. In granting form to formless worries, the artist suggests that our psychological demons are perhaps less fearful than they are beautifully, mournfully sympathetic. Take a look. (via Hi Fructose and Juxtapoz)

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