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Photography Reveals The Unique Beauty Contained Within Golf Balls

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Curiosity led photographer James Friedman to cut into his collection of golf balls to see what the cores looked like. To his surprise, he discovered that each golf ball contained a unique interiority, revealing elegant formal qualities and inspiring Friedman to become more enthusiastic about the possibilities of abstraction in his photography, especially as a corollary to his documentary work. His series, entitled Interior Design, captures these surprisingly colorful and distinctive golf ball guts, displaying the inner beauty contained within their homogenized white forms. Friedman has been fascinated with photography since he took his first self-portrait at 5 years old. He does not play golf. (via Lost at E Minor)

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Susan Copich Stages A Darkly Humorous And Disturbing Family Life In “Domestic Bliss”

Bath Time

Bath Time

Mommy Time

Mommy Time

Happy Days

Happy Days

Reaching middle-age, photographer Susan Copich was feeling disillusioned with her acting career, disenchanted with her marriage, and, when she noticed her absence from every family photo, as if she were disappearing. Her solution was to create the series “Domestic Bliss,” staged photos featuring her in darkly humorous scenes from an exaggerated life.

“I use proverbs, idioms, and biblical scriptures as a conduit to reach my inner creativity while grounding it to something real. Social observation continues to fuel my inspiration. The use of humor allows me to mock the worlds I traipse through while permitting the viewer to live vicariously through the character. I project my thoughts into a frozen a moment in time, allowing the story to continually unfold in front of you.”

She tackles topics like unsupervised children with access to guns, women and food, and homicidal anger, as well as lighter topics such as Christmas cards and crying over spilt milk. Some of the images are very dark, indeed, such as “Bath Time” with its implication of double murder/suicide, and “Anger Management,” which depicts Copich, with unkempt hair and Diane von Furstenberg dress, in the act of wringing the family dog’s neck in front of her daughters.

“I dwell in the dark thoughts and recesses of my mind to create character and subject, in order to project them into a frozen moment of time, allowing the story to continue to unfold bilaterally for the viewer. I feel a certain freedom to live vicariously through these characters to engage, seek to navigate (and, no less, avoid), both my own personal imperatives as woman, artist, mother, and wife, as well as those – personal, social and cultural – that are imposed on me by others.”

The photos are funny and disturbing, polarizing and attention-grabbing. It seems that Susan Copich is in no danger of disappearing any time soon.

All photos by Susan Copich, courtesy of Moen Mason Gallery. (Via Demilked)

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Karlos Carcamo

 

Combining his interest in urban culture and art history Karlos Carcamo navigates toward making work that is in constant dialog with each other. Through the use of high and low cultural iconography and art historical references he creates a working space between both cultural identities in which samples could be built upon with new content. The specific subject matter of  his work touches on issues related to inner city life while balancing elements that address a broad spectrum of formal issues that engage contemporary art discourse. Creating a vocabulary that speaks of and reflects the world we currently live in today.

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Yujean Park’s “Every Day Life”

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I found Yujean Park’s images on our Creative Pic Pool. Her work caught my eye for their haunting stillness. Many feature tableauxs of seemingly vacant, or recently vacated domestic spaces that seem subtly concerned with their own transience…Even when there is a figure in the frame, they seem ghostlike….or is it just me?

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Niccoló Bonfadini’s Othewordly Photos Of Frozen Forests

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Some people have an innate understanding of nature, and our place in it. Very few have the dedication to capture the most foreboding environments, even though these landscapes often offer the most complete portrait of the diversity and beauty of our planet. Niccoló Bonfadini is one of those few. The photographer (and environmental engineering student) captured these sensational landscape photographs while travelling through the Finnish lapland in the dead of the winter season.

With snow piled high and enveloping even the tallest trees, the Monza, Italy-based photographer offers a panoramic view of the very nature of winter. Taken at sunrise in temperatures reportedly ranging from -40°C to -15°C, Bonfadini’s photos show the plains and trees transformed into a world of towering clouds and endless white, carved with ice and snow. And with the snow covering everything (and all visual stimuli removed), the power of the season, and Life’s ability to persist through even the most brutal of environments, is shown.

Says the photographer and ardent traveller, “From the rugged mountain peaks to the fury of the ocean, from the snowy winter panoramas to the dense forests, the landscape never fails to impress and inspire those who observe it. Landscape photography is one of the most difficult kinds of photography. The artist has to be patient and determined to trasform what is ordinary in something extraordinary. But, above all, the photographer has to feel the beauty and the majesty of Nature.” (via mymodernmet)

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Ian Addison Hall

Ian Addison Hall’s Patterns of Science series is named after a program created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) shortly after World War II. The program’s purpose was to prevent an apocalyptic third world war by promoting intercultural understanding. At the time many thought the fundamental cause of international conflict was humanity’s failure to realize the ideals of a world community and that we are all grounded in common values.

Using vintage catalog imagery, each piece in this series explores the relationship between the patterns that exist in fashion and the patterns that comprise human genetics. While a clothing pattern is designed to make the wearer look and feel different than everyone else, when expanded over the model’s exposed skin it instead represents the common biological and emotional framework that we all share. Acknowledging the shared traits that we all share will encourage empathy, compassion, and better understanding.

 

Presented by the offset rack card printing company, Next Day Flyers.

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Brittany Zagoria

Brittany Zagoria‘s deeply personal  and emotional paintings do battle with her inner demons.

“My paintings reflect my subconscious need to demonstrate the existence of evil in others. I grew up with a mentally ill mother, whose physically and verbally abusive actions towards me were relentless, cruel, and, most crucially, without reason. The arbitrary nature of her attacks left me feeling scared, insecure, and especially perceptive of the inherent capacity for monstrosity in all individuals. Through painting portraits of people I have known, I have become aware that my perceptions of others and my relationships with them have been greatly skewed by emotional tumult from my past. A finished portrait is evidence of my raw, childlike way of perceiving each subject. Judgmental and distorted, they are artifacts of my disturbed perception of the world that render tangible my personal, psychological confrontations; the process of painting turns a critical eye toward subject and painter alike. Often grotesque, monstrous and condemning, the final product constitutes my ultimate judgment of human relations.”

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Fred Tomaselli

Fred Tomaselli
Fred Tomaselli is best known for his highly detailed paintings on wood panels, combining an array of unorthodox materials suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin. He sees his paintings and their compendium of data as windows into a surreal, hallucinatory universe. “It is my ultimate aim”, he says, “to seduce and transport the viewer in to space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.”

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