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Zachary Zezima

Zachary Zezima, illustration

Zachary Zezima is an illustrator from New York that graduated from Parsons School of Design. His illustrations are unnervingly disoriented and chaotic yet are seemingly able to carry out emotions. The work consists mostly of black and white with touches of colors to accentuate certain parts of the illustration. The characters in his work float in the chaotic backgrounds and play with the elements added in the illustration, making them quite dynamic and interesting to look at.

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Barry McGee at the Berkley Art Museum

Here’s a quick look into the Barry McGee exhibit at the Berkley Art Museum. It’s been up since the end of August, but you’ve only got one more month to check it out, since it closes December 9th.

You may know him as Ray Fong, Lydia Fong, Bernon Vernon, P.Kin, Ray Virgil, or Twist, but whatever moniker he’s creating under, McGee is an incredibly talented artist. Trained as a painter and a printmaker at the San Francisco Art Institute, McGee is now one of the most influential names in graffiti and street art. During his time in college, he began to take what he was learning to the streets off the Mission District, tagging under different pen names and switching up his styles. Now, he’s brining the streets he knows so well into gallery spaces, creating imaginary urban worlds in his installations. These new landscapes are filled with paintings, sketches, graffiti and sculptures, and visiting them feels a bit like walking around in McGee’s own mind.

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Photographer Dan Busta Gets Dotty On Naked Women

Dan Busta- Photograph

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Los Angeles photographer Dan Busta has a couple very interesting photographic series exploring single-themed concepts at length. This one, Dots, is fairly self explanatory: naked women covered in dots, posing within rooms also covered in dots. What the images offer is part optical illusion and part good old fashioned sensuality. The natural beauty of the models stripped down to the most basic elements of form and pose. Through his exploration of this distinct concept, and through the manipulation of dot and background colors, Busta harnesses a unique way to showcase the beauty of these women in a flattering way.

Busta is no stranger to photographing people. He has photographed the rich and famous, his website is a yearbook of actors and celebrities we know and love. Another interesting project of his, Ghosts, shows a white-clothed figure standing in various settings. Busta’s exploration of themed projects continues to be a strong point in his work, and something that sets him apart as a photographer. It’s exciting to think of what he will do next!

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Alois Kronschlaeger’s Architectural Interventions

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Habitat, 2012

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Spire, 2011

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Skylight Vitrine 2009

Austrian-born artist Alois Kronschlaeger creates work that exists at the intersection of art and architecture.  He is interested in environment and light, and in exploring time and space via geometry.  Often referring to his works as “architectural interventions,” Kronschlaeger is fascinated by the way viewers rearrange themselves within a space occupied by one of his interventions.

At times Kronschlaeger’s work feels surreal, as with Habitat, a large-scale installation in the Mammal Hall of the former Grand Rapids Public Museum.  For Site:Lab 2012 Kronschlaeger created what he called “a very awkward imagery of juxtaposition.”  He took the existing landscape of 27 habitat dioramas built in the mid-20th century and incorporated contemporary architectural interventions.  The impact of the combination of the organic and the geometric was strange and disorienting.   A viewer wonders about what is real and unreal, an inquiry that requires the him to further analyze his experience.

At other times Kronschlaeger’s work feels like pure science fiction, as with Spire, the massive installation he did for Site:Lab in 2011.  For this work Kronschlaeger’s installation occupied three floors of an abandoned commercial building in downtown Grand Rapids.  The work took over six weeks to create and the finished project was a grand demonstration of Kronschlaeger’s interest in environment, light and the ways new materials can revive and transform a space.

Kronschlaeger furthers his inquiries in his less dramatic works as well, such as his skylights, wall pieces and smaller sculptures, which I am particularly drawn to.  This fall he will finish a large work at MOCA Tuscon (see video below), and will then head to Beijing where he will create another site-specific structure.

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Fredrik Åkum

Paintings by Fredrik Åkum.

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Art Thoughtz: How To Be A Successful Artist

Who knew that all you had to do was be a white male to be a successful artist. I spent 7 years in art school for nothing! Join us next time when we go over how to be a famous black artist.

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Freya Jobbins’ Gruesome Portraits Made Out Of Doll Parts

Freya Jobbins’ repurposes doll parts and plastic figurines to create disturbingly beautiful busts made out of thousands of tiny body parts. Influenced by Ron Mueck’s sculptures and Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit & veggie paintings these provocative objects both delight and disturb the viewer all at once.

“My work explores the relationship between consumerist fetishism and the emerging recycling culture within the visual arts. Due to our society’s overspending on children’s plastic toys, especially dolls, the materials for my assemblages are very accessible.”

See more of Freya’s work after the jump including a special Darth Vader piece in honor of Lucas Films being sold to Disney! (via)

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Shocking Photos Capture The Last Remnants Of China’s Painful Foot Binding Tradition

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Her toes were broken when she was a kid, then constantly bound to make them smaller until she couldn’t walk straight anymore. At the age of 88, Zhang Yun Ying is among the last witnesses of China’s infamous tradition of foot binding.

It has been recently brought to attention by a British photographer Jo Farrell who is already known for documenting endangered traditions and cultures. Her ongoing project “Living History” captures the lives of some of the last remaining women in China with bound feet. According to Farrell, in the past year alone, three women she’s been documenting have passed away so she feels it is “imperative to focus on recording their lives before it is too late”.

Tiny feet (with the ideal being no bigger than 3 to 4 inches) were once considered to be the symbol of beauty and social status. Young women would crush and bind their feet hoping to marry into money. Concealing the bound foot from men’s eyes also instigated an erotic approach towards it. Even though the inhumane custom was banned in 1912 by Chinese government, it was still practiced behind closed doors.

Apart from showcasing the shocking photos to the public, Farrell wants to make a point that modern women are not so different from the elders she works with:

“In every culture there are forms of body modification that adhere to that cultures’ perception of beauty. From Botox, FGM, breast augmentation, scarring and tattooing, to rib removals, toe tucks and labrets.”

The project was successfully funded on Kickstarter and will hopefully develop into a full documentary. (via The Huffington Post)

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