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Artist built “Rape Tunnel” a big hoax


In early-mid September of last year, a bit of blog-fodder circulated around in which Ohio artist Richard Whitehurst was planning to pull off a huge-scale installation piece involving a tapering 22 foot tunnel that forces you to crawl into a submissive position as you reach the end. The subject will find the artist waiting at the end of the tunnel where he will try his best to overpower and rape the person who crawls through. Several blogs have tried picking up the scent on Google only to find that this Whitehurst fellow does not actually exist, nor the interviewer who posted the article on ArtLurker. Does that mean that the Ohio-art-scene doesn’t actually exist as well? The end word is, that image of the mythical “Rape Tunnel” is actually a photo of an artist in front of a fan he’d built and the article was published with the intent “to spark conversation on the state of art for a few hours with coverage of an entirely fake art project.” However, it was picked up by Gawker, subsequently turning it into a huge fiasco, and ArtLurker was not able to announce that it was after all, a hoax. A project so morally destitute and controversial must be in the end, too good to be true (?). What do you guys think? Btw, B/D does not support rape…

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HR Giger’s Skeletal Structure Bar Resembles An Ancient Castle From Your Deepest Nightmares

Welcome to the HR Giger bar located at the museum of the famous sci-fi artist in Gruyeres, Switzerland. Decked out with bone chairs, spinal chord ceilings, and dead baby  relief wallpaper this bar is surely to leave a lasting impression on while your awake as well as in your darkest dreams. (via)

The interior of the otherworldly environment that is the H.R. Giger Museum 
Bar is a cavernous, skeletal structure covered by double arches of vertebrae 
that crisscross the vaulted ceiling of an ancient castle. The sensation of being in this extraordinary setting recalls the tale of Jonah and the whale, lending the feel of being literally in the belly of a fossilized, prehistoric beast, or that 
you have been transported into the remains of a mutated future civilization.
Text excerpt from Secret Magazine No. 23, by Javier De Pison

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Rodrigo Arteaga Merges Science And Art With His Handsome Maps Created With Bacteria

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There are many kinds of maps to help find our way in this world. Political, road, and topographic maps may be familiar, but in Chilean artist Rodrigo Arteaga’s hands, maps are made by and of cultivated fungi. Meticulously grown and preserved, Arteaga’s maps are simultaneously science lesson and aesthetic object.

“Convergence” is a mapamundi (map of the world); an installation composed of filamentary fungi in glass containers. The propagation these fungi propagated represented the surface of the earth. The other components of the work were elements that evidence the research process: photocopies of mycology books, pencil drawings that imitate the growth of fungi, sketches, photographs, and Petri dishes with laboratory tests.

A second project, “Atlas de Chile Regionalizado,” consists of 15 glass containers in which different types of filamentary fungi represent each one of the 15 regions of Chile. The living organic matter of the fungi is delimited and cut in the shape of each region, then preserved under resin.

These interdisciplinary works involve people from interdisciplinary areas of thought. Their beauty is in the relationship between art and science; order and chaos.

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Julien Previeux’s Video Uses Dancing Lightsabers To Show Us The Power Of Gesture

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Julien Previeux - video

Julien Previeux - video

Julien Previeux’s Patterns of Life uses dancing lightsabers to reveal the simplicity and power of gesture. This 15 minute video is a highly choreographed work whose opening section uses light to uncover the essence of human movement. Dancers wired with lights illuminate the darkness and reveal the simplicity of movement.

Part galactic warrior and part neon sign, the dancers fill the space with the linearity of their limbs punctuated by shining spheres that add curvature and depth to their geometry.

But this is just the beginning of Previeux’s exploration of the intimacy of gesture and its implication in a world shared with others. Through what looks like a strenuous eye exam, Previeux demonstrates that eye movements have the power to reveal our thought patterns and perhaps betray our inner world to those who observe us carefully enough.

Also compelling is Previeux’s fascination with walking patterns and our natural tendency to follow the same paths again and again. By mapping the route of a young Parisian woman, where she works, where she lives, and where she goes to school, one of Previeux’s dancers uses tape to create a three dimensional model. Once mapped, her movements, which were assumed to be open and carefree, seem controlled and confined.

Patterns of Life switches between time frames and points of view. In doing so it presents us with various choreographed vignettes. Narrator Crystal Shepherd Cross guides us tranquilly through the intellectual terrain with ease so we can enjoy the grace that is Previeux’s work.

Julien Previeux’s Patterns of Life can be seen at DiverseWorks, Houston, Texas, in “What Shall We Do Next” until 19 March, 2016.

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Quayola Digitally Deconstructs Baroque Masterpieces

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Strata #4 – Site-Specific Installation from Quayola on Vimeo.

Strata #4 is a two channel video by the artist known simply as Quayola.  For the video, Quayola used images of two grand altarpieces by Rubens and Van Dyck.  He worked with an HDR photographer to obtain huge 20,000 by 20,000 pixel images of the work.  Then using unbelievable computing power and algorithms Quayloa investigates each masterpiece’s underlying structure, composition, and color.  Strata #4 at turn resembles 20th century abstract renditions of the baroque work.  Yet his video squarely part of a New Aesthetic, part of a 21st century sensibility.

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Ted Lawson Uses His Own Blood And Computers To Create His Large-Scale Drawings

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At the Joseph Gross Gallery on September 11, 2014, Brooklyn-based artist Ted Lawson will debut his solo show entitled The Map Is Not The Territory. The new series of work will consist of three dimensional wall-mounted pieces and free-standing sculptures made from MDF wood, brass plate etchings, and large-scale drawings rendered in the artist’s own blood. Yes, blood. The bodily fluid will be fed intravenously to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine using a technology similar to a 3D printer.

The idea behind using blood in conjunction with the computer is to challenge the notion that an artist whose practice utilizes technology is somehow disconnected from their work. Afterall, they aren’t crafting it with their hands; a machine is doing it for them in the form of coding, etc. Here, Lawson will give up part of himself for his work, intimately tying the worlds together and making it hard to argue otherwise. (Via Lost At E Minor)

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Studio Visit: Joe Bradley and Chris Martin

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Joe Bradley and Chris Martin were putting together a book to accompany their upcoming joint exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash which opens Feb 25th.  That’s Joe in the center, Chris Martin is on the far right.  Jeremy Willis is sitting in the back, he arranged the visit for me.

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Professor Teaches Human Anatomy By Painting Students Bodies

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At RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, lecturer Claudia Diaz has implemented an unconventional project in order to inspire her anatomy students. After teaching  human anatomy for over 20 years, Diaz decided to try something new as she found the regular routine of anatomical memorization boring and uninspired. Over the past 3 years, Diaz has explored human anatomy with her students by having them paint the bodies of 10 students, revealing tendons and bones that would be visible if the person’s skin were stripped. Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said. (via)

This project seems to follow a trend in the merging of science and art, specifically within the study of human anatomy, and the direct involvement of real human bodies in order to reveal the beauty of the human body, inside and out.

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