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You Won’t Believe That Thomas Demand’s Life-Size Installations Are Made Completely Of Paper

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Thomas Demand meticulously recreates scenes from photographs he finds through mainstream media entirely out of paper. The images are next to indiscernible from the real thing, and complicate the process a step further, the artist destroys his creations and only presents a large-scale photo print of his paper sculptures. Thus the viewer is not allowed to examine the execution, and is left all the more baffled by the precision of his pieces. He never includes people in his work, perhaps for logistical reasons as much as aesthetic, but it gives the photos an eerie quality that was already present in the clean cuts of the paper. No matter his effort to maintain a natural messiness and used quality to the spaces he creates, there is still subtle evidence that something is off, due to the lack of ware on the objects themselves.

Demand also creates animations (see a clip after the jump) using the same paper sculpture technique. His most ambitious production is Pacific Sun. Demand took the footage from a YouTube clip and completely recreated it in paper (editing out the people, of course). The clip is from the security camera on a cruise ship caught in a storm in the South Pacific. The animation tracks hundreds of objects – from tables and chairs to a straw – sliding back and forth across the dining room as the ship pitches in the waves.

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Jill Sylvia cuts it up

I’ve never met Jill Sylvia but I know that she must be a very patient individual to make such meticulous work. Using found ledger papers Jill cuts geometric patterns into the papers grid lines creating delicately powerful geometric abstractions that fall somewhere between the lines of drawings and sculptures.

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Zanele Muholi Explores Representation Of Lesbian African Women

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Katlego Mashiloane and Nosipho Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg 2007

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Nando Maphisa and Mpho Sibiya, Sasolburg, Johannesburg 2006

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Busi Mdaki and Malesedi Nthute, Katlehong, Johannesburg 2007

Zanele Muholi, a South African activist and visual artist, explores and re-imagines the intimate portrayal of the lives of black lesbian women in South Africa.

Moreover, Being, the title of this collection, according to Muholi, aims to question the construction of sexuality “and then [the] deconstruct of ourselves […] in order to see the parts that make up [the] whole.”

Black women and sexuality, in conjunction, have always been topics of heated conversation, as it not only refers to sexuality, but also a matter of colonialism and white patriarchy.

The artist is concerned with her sexual identity coming off as ‘un-African’ – perhaps a product of years of stigmatization on behalf of white colonialist and patriarchal societies, deeming the black female sexual identity as one that is hyper-sexualized and strictly heterosexual- or even then, the image of a black female to “reproduce” heterosexuality and white patriarchy.

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Kristy Milliken’s Drawings Of Luscious Fat People Confronts Body Image Issues

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Australian artist Kristy Milliken knows nudity. A former photographer in the amateur porn industry, she became inured to capturing images of stereotypically attractive, thin women on film and moved to paper and ink and a new point of view.

“We see skinny women everywhere. I always forced ‘flaws’ into any of the skinny women I painted, the bigger ladies are what they evolved into. Something far more interesting, of course different pieces have different intent behind them, but there’s a naivety to them. An unaffectedness that I aspire to in my own life. I draw them as beautiful because I think they are.” Source

Milliken’s ink drawings are adorably subversive. The women are gorgeously fat, rosy and delicious. They look luscious, like ripe fruit, plump and sweet. Round tummies, thick thighs, heavy breasts, all kissed with pink and purple, topped with adorable round cheeked faces. They’re sexy, these large women, bound and gagged, smoking and eating, covered with food. The whimsical execution contrasts with the overtly sexual nature of the work.

“It’s a weird time for fat. Fat is both confronting and can be the most normal thing in the world, It’s the context that’s important. Plus I’m sick of all the pictures of skinny girls that seem to be everywhere.” Source

According to the artist, the themes of greed and beauty reoccur in her work, paired in an unusual way. Luxuriant pasta cascades over the women, sating and draping and entangling them. But despite her claim that these images are about avarice, the images feel affirming, even charming.

Body positive art can sometimes be confrontational, taking a focused, warts and all approach. Asserting that she’s not attempting to be political, Milliken’s work feels joyous and sweet— a light perspective on a weighty subject.

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Patrice Letarnec’s ‘Head Over Heels’ Photo Series Turns The Human Body Upside Down

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French art director and photographer Patrice Letarnec combines his two talents when he devised this cleverly simplistic photoseries. Having his subjects switch their top and bottom clothes, Letarnec then has them stand on their hands, walking about upside down on their daily routes. Thus the title of the series, Head Over Heels, which is taken quite literally.

The results are subjects which look familiar at first, until a general unease sets in to the missing head, arms which are too long, and legs that are far too short. The orangutan-like subjects are more comedic than disconcerting, another win for Letarnec’s eye (who also deserves a bit of credit for finding subjects who can balance on their hands so well while blindfolded).

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Yulia Brodskaya’s Intricate Illustrations Made of Paper

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Russian graphic designer and artist Yulia Brodskaya draws with paper instead of on it.  Her highly detailed pieces are constructed of rolled, folded, and carefully placed strips of color paper.  The intricate curls of paper are intriguing in themselves while creating a larger image – it took me a moment to realize what I saw in the top image.  Brodskaya’s process and style has garnered her some serious attention.  Her long client list includes companies such as Starbucks, Anthropologie, Penguin Press, and HOW Magazine. [via]

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Video Watch: Lorenz Potthast’s Real Time Slow Motion Helmet

 

German artist Lorenz Potthast  recently developed a helmet that turns the world around you into slow motion. While we still can’t quite control reality enough to actually slow the passage of time, Potthast’s helment which lets us control our perception of it is as good as we’ve got right now. Not only does it, as the video says, make the wearer aware of the time they occupy, but it makes them interact with the image world as it relates to time, which is amazing. The christmas these begin appearing under trees will be the beginning of the future we have been waiting for. Watch a video of the helmet in action after the jump. (via)

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