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David Mesguich’s Unsettling Sculptures

 

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Whether David Mesguich is creating sculptures or painting with watercolors, he maintains a basic color palette, heavy in contrasting blacks, whites, greys, and tones of sepia. His geometric sculptures of faces and people look like they were printed from a 3D printer. This conception gives his figures a digital effect that, when paired with the size, gaze, warp effects, or placement of them, has the potential to unsettle a viewer. This effect is even more pronounced when considered alongside Mesguich’s cardboard CCTV camera sculptures,100 of which he placed in various locations around Marseille. This idea of surveillance is even depicted throughout his watercolor paintings that represent scenes of city life, usually related to mobility and movement. Mesguich’s work seeks to challenge “modes of control” by addressing the “transparency of windows and shadows.”

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Jesse Balmer’s Amazing Linework in Fantasy-Tinged Illustrative Work

 

 

SF dude Jesse Balmer makes drawings and other illustrative works with a comics/animation sensibility and fantasied/mythologically scaled subject matter. Balmer’s characters and good sense of motion make these works really awesome, but it’s his linework that really steals the show. The fluid curves and solid hatching on these are drool-worthy. He’s also been known to use a red and blue “3D” effect in his drawings which pops off really nicely. Put on a bib and take in more of Balmer’s vibed-out work after the jump.

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Bratislav Milenkovic’s Typographic Illustrations

Serbian designer Bratislav Milenkovic’s imagery sits at the intersection of typography and illustration usually combining the two to create cleaver and playful images. Morre Typography fun after the jump.

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M/A/S/H/

Clever advertising design firm in Australia. 

 

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Lucid Dreaming: Romy Maxime’s Romantic Photography Of Musicians Using Infrared Film

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Romy Maxime has been experimenting with an interesting medium of late – Infrared film (typically used in military surveillance). Her series Lucid Dreaming is a soft, romantic, hazy collection of portraits of musicians based in Berlin. She uses the unusual candy colored tones of the film to evoke a strange surrealism from her subjects and their surroundings. Her images look like dramatic fairy-tales, or stills from some sort of film noir. Maxime talks about those influences on her:

This ongoing personal project was born out of nostalgia, a love for classic art films and the style and colors of photographs from the 1960s. (Source)

Growing up between Zurich, Cape Town and Cannes (she now calls Berlin home), Maxime translates her gypsy tendencies and ease with nature and quietness onto film. Working mostly in fashion photography, and portraiture, Maxime loves to create fantastical images that are like an exaggerated reality. She talks about her favorite parts of fashion photography:

It’s totally unrealistic! It’s the fantasy genre of photography – mostly an illusion with every excuse to include beautiful things. I do try to create some sort of story when I shoot fashion otherwise the clothes remain just beautifully cut textiles on a model. (Source)

She also talks about the effect yoga has had on her and her work – the calmness, serenity, and quiet that is all practiced in yoga gives her the focus she needs to capture the right mood in her shots. Read a full interview with her here on the International Foundation for Women Artists Blog. And be sure to see more of her many beautiful images on her Tumblr page and her Facebook page.

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Chris Forsyth’s Photographs Capture The Architectural Beauty Of Montreal’s Metro System

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Since October 2014, photographer Chris Forsyth has been capturing the architectural beauty and sophistication of Montreal’s metro stations. The city’s underground network is massive, with four lines, 68 stations, and over a million daily passengers. Forsyth’s vibrant, long-exposure shots accentuate an impressive side to the Metro, beyond its functionality: a creative and brightly bold character, which is both a hallmark of modernism and architectural design.

Construction on the Metro began in the 1960s, during the tenure of Mayor Jean Drapeau. Each station was assigned to a different Canadian architect in order to create unique designs for the spaces. For passengers today, it may sometimes be challenging to appreciate these artistic, historical nuances while in the midst of urban mayhem, but as Forsyth’s project description points out, “architectural portraits show that beautiful design is all around, even when we don’t have the time to slow down and notice.” Forsyth’s contemplative images reveal there are signs of human expression and ingenuity embedded in the very foundations of Montreal.

Visit Forsyth’s Instagram page to follow his ongoing project. For readers living in or visiting Montreal, be sure to share your photos of the Metro using the hashtag #mtlmetroproject.

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Crazy Looking Robots, Animals And Faces Made Out Of Trashed Boxes Move And Play In The Streets Of Bushwick, NY

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Monsters faces, robots and crazy looking animals made our reclaimed cardboards and boxes transformed by artist Bryan Rogers are taking over the trash spots on the sidewalks of Bushwick in Brooklyn, NY. They create a surreal ambiance in the middle of the streets.
Bryan Rogers collects thrown-away pizza boxes, cardboards, boxes of any sizes from the neighborhood every week and make them into sculptures. He puts them out back on the sidewalk next to the collected trash and check if they’ve been taken or not. So far he says, the armor-clad centaur had its head taken first and the rest of its body later. He takes pictures of them and creates fun and dynamic animated Gifs he posts on his blog.

In the path of other artists designing art from reclaimed means he uses the streets are inspiration. Dag Weiser, following the same process, uses cardboards to build fantasy characters and display them outdoors.The rendering is creative, positive and ephemeral. The boxes are painted with vibrant colors, the body of the creature is punched, cut out and some small elements might be added (teeth, ears, hands and feet…). Bryan Rogers does not collect his art, he picks up unwanted materials, creates for his pleasure and ends the life of his disposable art the same way it started.

Discover the Moving Boxes on Bryan Rogers’ blog, updated daily.

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Dea Lellis

São Paulo based Dea Lellis’ graphic paintings are steeped in mythology as well as references to movies, terror, music, and fashion.

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