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Jagoda Boruch

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I don’t know too much about Jagoda Boruch, except that this shooter is 19 years old and lives in Poland… and apparantly has an affinity for obstructing the faces of the people she photographs.  At least, that’s the case in this series of images; whereby Jagoda omits the face but reveals the frankness of life’s quirks instead.

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Victor Boullet

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Social Hypocrite series by Victor Boullet.

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Amanda Nedham’s Tension Of History

Primarily concerned with the various taxonomic functions of history, Amanda Nedham’s works on paper exhibit a technical proficiency and enamoured exploration of natural history’s complex and overlapping structures. Through a process of abstraction based on the collaging of drawings, largely from television and internet sources, she attempts to focus on those moments that create tension as they challenge the governing voice of history.

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Joseph Parra’s Manipulated Photographs Are Braided, Folded, Cut, And Scratched To Reveal The Unseen

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Joseph Parra is an artist working with the human portrait and figure. While he obviously draws and paints very well, Parra is not necessarily concerned with perfectly replicating what someone looks like. He finds this notion limiting to an artist; after all, a photo or realistic painting can only go so far. You’ve made someone look like their outward appearance, but now what?

Parra strives to delve deeper into the figure or portrait and reveal what is unseen. His work questions what it means to be human using a couple of different methods. One way is through layers. Aside from a portrait, he adds of media that distorts the face or the body. Parra scrapes, pricks, and sands his subjects. In his words, this is “acting as reminders that we are merely a union of ideas.” Additionally, he will cut, braid, or fold paper as a way to express the complex nature of humanity. Oneself (directly below) is the same portrait but manipulated in three different ways. It references the fractured, multiple, and twisted ways we often view ourselves. Some days we think we’re great, while others we are loathsome.

Much of Parra’s work is screen prints and digital prints, which I think enhance his ideas and again parallels the human experience. We see these images mutilated and/or distorted, and they look very textural. Yet up close, they are mostly reproduced images and have a smooth sheen – the rawness is kept contained. I compare it to having a friend who appears very put together on the surface, but beneath you know they are a mess.

Parra was featured last year on Beautiful/Decay, not long after graduating college. Since then, he’s created more work that focuses on the braiding or manipulating of paper, which are some of my favorite pieces. I’m looking forward to seeing where Parra goes from here.

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Jim Stoten’s Weird Little World

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Pickle starburst sunglass wearing kings eating cupcakes and playing a toy-sized harpsichord. Contentedly surrounded squash loving computer techs. Eye painted wood sunglass flaps. Balloon heads of masks of masks. Ahh, Jim Stoten creates such a strange, weird and wonderful little world.

 

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Studio Visit: Ryan Schneider

I headed over to Brooklyn to check out what Ryan Schneider had cooking after not seeing his work for a year.  He was painting when I got there; mixing a fleshly color on the big glass palette in the center of the room.  Canvases lined the walls, some were finished and some were in progress.  He paints all the nouns: people, places and things; and does so in a thoughtful way that reflects life.  Still lifes which range from bathtubs to bookshelves, and landscapes which seem to suggest an alternate, more romantic reality.

The paintings are populated with figures, and he had interesting things to say about figure painting.  In person, the paintings are very obviously physical.  They combine juicy paint, carved-in-words, bold colors, and a funky sense of space.  This makes for paintings which flip between pattern and illusion.  His new paintings were confident, and maybe even more colorful and spatially complex than his previous work.  Schneider recently left Priska C Juschka, his gallery of several years.  Besides being a painter, Schneider is also a curator and has organized high profile group shows in locations near and far, and he was at it again.  He is behind a show which just opened in Austin, at Champion Contemporary, called “Wild Beasts.”   He included a group of artists who share a love of color and admiration for Matisse and the French Fauves.  Read some of our discussion after the jump.

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Paul Yore’s Dazzling Tapestry Cheerfully Welcome Us To Hell

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Australian artist Paul Yore uses colorful applique, sequins, weaving, and more to depict a world that seems cheerful, but is the opposite of sunshine and rainbows. Instead, Yore’s materials tell us that things are much worse. In one work, he welcomes us to hell. Vibrant hearts and yellow smiley faces still opposite to skulls and erect penises in these tapestry wall hangings.

Upon initial glance, your eyes are drawn to all the colors under the rainbows. It feels jubilant and even innocent. But, as soon as you start to study Yore’s work, you see that these choices are his form of biting commentary on political and social issues. Often, leaders will try and sugarcoat serious issues, to be dismissive of victims or even blame them. The artist exposes this type of hypocrisy (and more) by putting it all out in the open so that you can’t look away.

The dazzling satire is at times overwhelming, as if the artist has so much to say that he wants to fit it within one dizzying piece. Here, it’s akin to the epic paintings Hieronymous Bosch in terms of of a compositional frenzy. Where you look for a long time, finding new small moments every time that you look. (Via Collection Department)

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Peter Dobill

Born in New Zealand, Peter Dobill is a Brooklyn, NY based actionist who has performed across the country. He is the recent recipient of the 2008-2009 Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art Grant. For this four hour endurance piece titled “Receiver,” the artist is suspended in a pool of milk, while a bowl placed overhead drips a continuous stream of milk into his nose. By constructing extravagant sets in which to carry out his actions, Dobill seeks to add a visual component to the performances. Dude is wild.

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