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Aaron Draper Poignant Yet Hopeful Photographs Of The Homeless

Aaron Draper - Photography 6 Aaron Draper - Photography 1

The Underexposed series illuminates outsiders of the world, homeless people of our streets. Aaron Draper has made the deliberate decision to literally put in the spotlight a dozen of men and women living on the streets, giving an authentic representation of what could happen to any of us. Not wanting to fall into the cliche of taking black and white photographs or insisting on the harsh features of his subjects, Aaron Draper is applying a commercial tone to the way he envisions their lives, giving the viewers a more positive imagery of scenes not so pleasant to usually watch.

That’s the reason the series has gone viral, the viewer is not in a position of guilt, he doesn’t need to feel bad. He is invited to share that special connection the photographer encountered when meeting his subjects. Inspired by John Steinbeck’s vision on dispossessed families struggling to carve their way into life, he spent a lot of time and money getting to know the personalities behind the facade of their humble lives. Using a camera strobe and a documentary effect, Aaron Draper wants to turn around the false perception one might have about homeless life. He says if he can only initiate that shift, his work will be successful in his heart.

The video below details the photography process of the Underexposed series and shows a passionate Aaron Draper at work. (via Trenf)

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Photographs Of Birds Taken Through A Spotting Scope Expose Feathery Emotions

Carol Richards - Photography
Carol Richards - Photography Carol Richards - Photography

Holding her Nikon Digital SLR camera up to a spotting scope, Carol E. Richards examines a surprising array of feathery emotions akin to her own.

The use of two surfaces or buffers, sometimes three, if shot through a window, create a fascinating ring around each figure, a soft focused vignette of sorts, comparable to that of a toy camera. The result is an ambient deepening, apparent not only in the composition, but also in the subject matter and the artist’s  intrigue with trailing or meditating on each flighty movement.

Salvador Dali once said, “Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings.” On this note, Richards explores the act of bird watching as a certain mirroring, clearly exposing humanity’s inclination to anthropomorphize animals and as she asserts, “project qualities onto them that can be heartbreaking, sweet, or simply intriguing.”

Thus, in the vein of Dali’s quote, Richards shares with us her most recent collection: Birds Have Wings from Nazraeli Press.

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Dive Into the Underwater World of Adam Wallacavage’s Magnificent Octopus Chandeliers

Adam Wallacavage - epoxy clay, lamp parts, epoxy resin and spray paint

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

What do you get when you combine underwater sea creatures with elegant and sophisticated lighting? You get the weird and whimsical octopus chandeliers of artist Adam Wallacavage. The Philadelphia based artist uses traditional ornamental plastering techniques to create working chandeliers in the shape of octopus and fantastical sea life. Each chandelier is created from a wide range of materials such as epoxy resin, iridescent powders, spray paint, and glitter. His inspiration and ideas come from a very eclectic range of sources such as flashy church decoration, tales of underwater adventure, and, not surprisingly, taxidermy. His absurd style is both gaudy and Victorian while still being absurdly fun.

Wallacavage’s childlike imagination turns a seemingly normal object into wonderfully gaudy and kitschy chandeliers full of shiny colors and tentacles. Each chandelier Wallacavage constructs is unique with their wide array of pastel, glittery colors and their endless ocean-life motifs. These include green seashells, purple tentacles, pink pearls, and even big, round eyes starring straight at you. Some of his chandeliers seem to be inspired by the pastel colors and ornate design of the Rococo period, while his other chandeliers have a louder palette with strange faces and eyes. His octopus creations create a surrealistic atmosphere as each sea monster is suspended from the ceiling, reaching out its tentacles, which happen to hold the chandelier lighting. After seeing Wallacavage’s highly imaginative and extravagant chandeliers, you realize how much chandeliers already looked like octopus! Not only can you find the artist’s octopus chandeliers in several New York City galleries, Wallacavage is also an accomplished photographer. He even has a book published on his photography titled Monster Sized Monsters available in many museum stores.

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Save 50% on Last Minute Holiday Shopping With B/D!

To celebrate the holiday season and get ready for 2013 we are having a massive 50% off sale on all books, magazines, shirts, and accessories on the B/D shop from now until January 2nd 2013. All US orders placed by January 20th will be shipped out US Priority Mail and will arrive before Christmas. Just use DISCOUNT CODE: CREATIVE50 during check out and give the gift of creativity and artistic expression this holiday season!

 

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Teo “Moneyless” Pirisi’s Mysterious Geometric Installations

Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi

Born from a complicated mixture of graffiti, typographic abstraction and installation art, the work of Italian street artist Teo “Moneyless” Pirisi differs slightly from what you would expect to find in an outdoor space. His mathematical, geometric sketches are quiet, contemplative—an appropriate precursor to his finished installations. What started as lettering on walls steadily shifted toward pure abstraction, where Pirisi says “my efforts then dropped the symbolic meaning of the letter.”

Pirisi ditched the paint, the letters and the walls for a series of carefully choreographed suspended rope installations. He has traveled the world creating multiple iterations of these works, which are often found suspended in wild or forgotten spaces. Pirisi’s attention to perspective and material are seamless, and his placement is usually quite surprising—providing moments of wonder for curious passerby.

From the artist: “My shapes are reduced to the minimum, at the same time they carry some kind of an intense tension, an invisible movement; most of my patterns hide multiple visions and different perspectives. I think my art now speaks through geometry.”

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Hypnotic Time-Lapse Videos Of Cacti In Bloom

cacti bloom

Like many people, Greg Krehel loves cacti and succulents. But, living in Jacksonville, FL was not conducive to keeping these plants happy and healthy. The desert-loving flora would drown in the sogginess of Jacksonville. That was until he randomly selected a cactus from a local garden store. Instead of dying, it thrived, and produced beautiful, large blooms in a mixture of colors. It turns out that  Krehel selected a echinopsis, which is a genus of cactus from South America that loves humidity. And, better yet, there were hundreds of other varieties out there. Krehel photographs them with an iPhone 5 or a Cannon 6d camera and post them to his Instagram, under the username @echinopsisfreak.

Once his first cactus thrived, Krehel bought more. Many more..“My single echinopsis acquired by accident was soon joined by 5… 25… 50… and now I’m at 100 other echinopsis species and hybrids, ” he told the Instagram blog.

Krehel is passionate about imaging the echinopsis, which blooms in a day and peak for only an hour or two. “Their brief existence pushes you to photograph the heck out of them,” he says. This led him to using time-lapse photography to capture their beauty in short, mesmerizing videos. The echinopsis’ gently-opening blooms are easy to watch in hypnotic fashion. You’ll probably find yourself click the “play” button over and over again.

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Jagoda Boruch

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I don’t know too much about Jagoda Boruch, except that this shooter is 19 years old and lives in Poland… and apparantly has an affinity for obstructing the faces of the people she photographs.  At least, that’s the case in this series of images; whereby Jagoda omits the face but reveals the frankness of life’s quirks instead.

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superheroes Placed In Iconic Images Of The Past

superheroes

superheroes

superheroes

superheroes

Digital artist and graphic designer Kode Logic (aka Boss Logic) is used to taking existing imagery and adapting, changing and repurposing it. With his newest series, Playing With History, the Melbourne, Australia artist samples some of the most recognizable photos in the history of the medium, and either subtly or blatantly alters them by including superheroes and villains.

Ranging from the construction workers who built New York’s skyscrapers palling around with Spiderman, or an alternate history where Mortal Kombat’s four-armed boss Goro menacingly watches over Ellis Island on the Statue of Liberty’s plinth, Kode Logic plays with both humor and irreverence (exemplified by two separate Kennedy edits – one with Marty McFly skitching on his hover-board, the other featuring The Watchmen’s The Comedian preparing to assassinate the president). Explaining the project (and a premise shared by many from the digital and web-based design and art communities), Kode Logic says, “…as a digital artist we are the new breed of artists and we are all trying to innovate our own style to be remembered and past on as a foundation you laid down…” (via albotas)

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