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Ian Pfaff


Ian Pfaff’s demo reel is a classic. In my mind, the guy nailed it. While partying really, really, hard while on spring break, Ian multitasks by writing, editing, directing, animating, building props, and making music. All around killer.

VIA ChangeTheThought

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Ruben Plasencia’s Photographs Of The Blind Explore The Concept Of Prejudice

Ruben Plasencia

Ruben Plasencia Ruben Plasencia Ruben Plasencia

Ruben Plasencia settled on the idea of photographing the blind when contemplating how to approach the subject of prejudice as an artist.  He felt that blind individuals are unique because they are subject to prejudice, but don’t generate prejudice against others the way people who can see do.  His series, Obscure, forces viewers to look directly into the eyes of people who cannot return the stare.

Working with ONCE, Spain’s national organization for the blind, to complete the project, Plasencia found himself incredibly moved by the experience.  Of the project he writes:

Racist prejudices and stereotypes continue to dominate our societies — judgments which are made at a level that is only skin-deep. In “Obscure”, I created portraits of the blind. These faces create a mockery of our unthinking dependence on vision. A blind person seeks more reliable ways to read between the lines and understood essences, no longer able to fall back on their eyesight as the only reliable means.

I composed the portraits in a simple manner: a figure and a ground. I wanted to eliminate as many external factors as possible and leave behind only what’s most important to me: “The Look”.

Far from being a simple visual appetizer, this project ventures to convey the deepest intimacy of the look. By gazing upon eyes which cannot see, I want us feel deeply what it means to have sight. Despite having the gift of vision, we manage to blind ourselves every day. We are all given the great opportunity to observe and I hope we can appreciate its value. (via LensCulture)

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Malika Favre’s Animated Kama Sutra Alphabet

Kama Sutra Alphabet Kama Sutra Alphabet Kama Sutra Alphabet Kama Sutra Alphabet

In 2011, illustrator and graphic designer Mailka Favre was commissioned by Penguin Books to illustrate the new Deluxe Classic Cover of the Kama Sutra by Vatsyayana. Using the first 7 letters she illustrated for the commission as a starting point, Favre decided to develop the full set of the alphabet, resulting in a racy Kama Sutra typeface. After creating the designs, Favre worked with animators to turn her images into actively coital gifs. Inspired by the everyday design and fashion she encounters in London, Favre’s aesthetic is bold and colorful, with clean and simple lines and curves. Favre admits she often wears the colors she uses in her designs, and she’s unsure which design choice influences which. Because her designs are so simple, Favre has to approach her work with a strong concept, something that is elegantly evident in her Kama Sutra alphabet. Each letter of the exhibition is available for purchase as a limited edition of 25 screenprints, numbered and signed by the artist.

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Josef Schulz

Josef Schulz

Photographer Josef Schulz’s new series entitled “Sign out” focuses on a great variety of billboards in their natural habitats (a billboard tour one could say) during his travels in the States. He has “freed” the large-scale ads of their functions, thereby breaking off all communication and “signing out”. Removed of their contexts, all that’s left are pleasant forms and even more beautiful colors against their blue-sky canvases.

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Anouk Kruithof

Anouk Kruithof’s photos are just so weird. It’s like he’s kind of playing with us and trying to shock us at the same time with simple notions…

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Patrick Wolf- Thesus

I don’t want to ruin this, so just make sure you watch this video all the way to the end. Patrick Wolf is a total nut! Directed by Jorge Jaramillo.

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Ines Kozic Weaves Modern Fairy Tales In Her Macabre Photographs

Ines Kozic - Photography

Ines Kozic - Photography

Macabre Photography

Macabre Photography

Photographer Ines Kozic captures modern fairy tales decorated with bone and hair. The mood is contemplative, with a subtler flavor of body horror as her fair-haired women spin their hair into thick braids and pose with ruby-red lips and a court of insects. There’s also a sense of playfulness: a woman painting with her hair in an Escheresque exercise of physics; a man’s beard woven into a basket.

According to her artist’s statement, Kozic’s work is “a reflection on the body’s ornamentation, post-mortem photography and fairy tales’s world.” Her inspiration from photography of the recently deceased in repose is especially clear in the photos where her subjects wear garlands of delicate bone.

The ever-present sense of solitude in her photography make it seem as though everyone is frozen in time. The result is an unsettling mix of beauty and the kind of disquieting daydreams that one might find in a languishing surburbia. Her subjects perform everyday chores — sewing, weaving — but with surreal objects, bedecking themselves with beetles instead of jewels.

If, as Kozic says, she’s searching for “macabre poetry,” then she’s certainly found it. (via Yatzer)

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Brian Dettmer Uses Surgical Tools To Carve Intricate Drawings Into Old Books

brian-dettmer1 brian-dettmer2brian-dettmer11 brian-dettmer12New York-based artist Brian Dettmer’s sculptural, multi-layered books are so intricate that they require him to use surgeon tools in his process. He carefully carves illustrations and text out of old medical journals, dictionaries, maps books, encyclopedias, and more. Nothing inside of the books is implanted – pieces are only removed. The idea is that these subtractions will reveal new histories and memories now that the story and context has changed. Dettmer sees his work as a collaboration with the existing work’s past creators.

He writes about his creations, which are a comment on the changing landscape of technology. From Dettmer’s artist statement:

The age of information in physical form is waning. As intangible routes thrive with quicker fluidity, material and history are being lost, slipping and eroding into the ether. Newer media swiftly flips forms, unrestricted by the weight of material and the responsibility of history. In the tangible world we are left with a frozen material but in the intangible world we may be left with nothing. History is lost as formats change from physical stability to digital distress.

 

The richness and depth of the book is universally respected yet often undiscovered as the monopoly of the form and relevance of the information fades over time. The book’s intended function has decreased and the form remains linear in a non-linear world. By altering physical forms of information and shifting preconceived functions, new and unexpected roles emerge. (Via Demilked)

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