Get Social:

The Tale of How


The Tale of How from Shy the Sun on Vimeo.

This song reminds me of the operatic magical feel of Nightmare Before Christmas- this video is not unlike an ancient Gravure coming to life. Really enchanting motion work. I love the talking rats, the fantasy- Secret of Nimh meets Hayao Miyazaki meets Japanese woodcut- just stunning.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Sound Of Decay: The Zax “Nothing To Celebrate”

Start your Monday and the right foot (or should I say paw?) with The Zax’s Nothing To Celebrate video which tells the story of “Peke” a mature pekingese dog and his mistress, the ‘Pink Lady’, living a lavish lifestyle and an having an impossible romance while bored to death in their pink apartment drinking pink champagne and playing all day and all night. Watch the full video directed by Ben And Julia after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Federico Pietrella

Artist Federico Pietrella was born in Rome and now lives and works in Berlin. His work gives new meaning to the term… “time-based media,” using time and date stamps (you know, the kind from libraries) to compose his artwork. Check out a good sampling after the jump.

Currently Trending

Bryan Olson’s Sci-Fi Collages

Bryan Olson lives and works in North Carolina. He combines vintage imagery to form an ongoing science fiction themed narrative. Many sci-fi elements are prevalent; portals, UFOs, analytical graphs, and celestial bodies are common in his work.The  collages represent our never ending fascination with the unknown and the search for our place in the Universe.(via)

Currently Trending

Brendan George Ko- The Barking Wall

I’m loving Brendan George Ko’s The Barking Wall series. More images after the jump.

Currently Trending

Mess Lab Interviews Amir Fallah

 

 

Mess Lab recently caught up with founder/Creative Director/main man Amir at Pool tradeshow. Watch Amir discuss the Beautiful/Decay brand, and give advice for anyone looking to get into the art/fashion/design fields!

Currently Trending

Georgios Cherouvim’s Robotic Installation Intimates Debates Between Political Figures

debate-8debate-2 debate-4

Multidisciplinary artist Georgios Cherouvim’s installation titled Debate looks like your average conversation between two political candidates. But, there are some big differences: the figures’ heads are replaced with flashing geometric forms and they talk using unintelligible robot noises (think a series of beep boops). And of course, these aren’t people – they are realistic-looking plastic mannequins that are animated by an Arduino micro-controller with a custom “conversation” – stimulating program.

Cherouvim says that he entered the world of visual arts through computer animation, which explains the complex nature of Debate. The triangular and rectangular “heads” are controlled by an algorithm that changes lights and sounds based on parameters like how long one of them has been talking, if there was any silence, and the last time one was ignored by the other.

In his artist statement, Cherouvim writes:

My work is a visual representation based upon my perspective of social and political issues. I question established ideas of the modern lifestyle and how common social behaviors and ideologies have turned us against our environment and our selves. I want my work to invite the viewer to step back, observe our actions from a different perspective and associate them to the consequences.

“The act never reaches a conclusion and it is performed in a non-deterministic way,” Cherouvim told The Creators Project. “Their language is incomprehensible, causing the viewer to lose interest in the conversation and politics all together.” (Via The Creators Project)

Currently Trending

This Is What Humans Looked Like 30,000 Years Ago

article-2623485-1daaf5a900000578-889_634x662article-2623485-1daaf57b00000578-209_634x645article-2623485-1daaf59600000578-267_634x475article-2623485-1dab051600000578-819_634x423

The Paris-based sculptor Elisabeth Daynès listens to bones, to the remains of our evolutionary ancestors that have lived up to three million years ago. Throughout her prolific 20 year career, the “paleoartist” has worked from the skulls of wooly mammoths to species of hominid to create vividly detailed figures. Based on 18 data points that mark the bone, she can use a computer to model facial features that she later shapes out of clay. She refers to research and other bone samples to determine the build of her subjects, and ultimately she creates a silicone cast, complete with delicate painted features: veins, goosebumps, blemishes.

In a final step towards humanizing her sculptures, Daynès includes prosthetic eyes, teeth, and hair, each of which is as historically and scientifically accurate as possible. Current research suggests that Neanderthals, for example, had red hair; for her uncanny hominids, that range from Homo sapien to Homo erectus, she uses a blend of human hair. In her mind’s eye, the artist draws an informed portrait of each subject she reanimates; from the bones, she can determine period, sex and age, along with finer details like culture, climate, diet, and health.

For Daynès, this process is as much an art as it is a science. Ultimately, she hopes to reconnect with our past, embarking on a forensic search of what makes us human. Dismayed by the ways in which early human ancestors are reviled as unintelligent brutes, she injects her creations with a powerful dose of humanity; their brows furrow with concentration, and their eyes are painfully gentle. She explains “missing” them when they leave her studio for a permanent home in a museum. Take a look. (via Daily Mail and Lost at E Minor)

Currently Trending