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B/D Back Issue Sale Ends Wednesday At Midnight!

Calling all you completists! Forget about your vintage coin collection and enjoy The Beautiful/Decay Back Issue Sale! Once upon a time only Czars and Royalty could complete their B/D collection, but now you, too, can complete your collection on the cheap. We’re talking over55% off all back issues for one week! Take advantage and complete your collection of the most comprehensive art and design magazine today!

Sale Ends: This Wednesday at Midnight!

 

 

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Lorenzo Nanni Silk Botany

Lorenzo Nanni uses silk  and embroidery to create incredibly detailed sculptures of underwater creatures and various forms of botany. Lorenzo also creates prosthetic jewelry that also takes on the natural and organic forms of his sculptures.

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Mark Mulroney and Charles Linder

Always psyched to see some new Mark Mulroney jams! Haven’t exactly heard of Charles Linder, but I must say, that installation is looking wild. Here’s a taste of both artists most recent exhibition endeavor, more after the jump…

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Hybrid Futures: Amy Congdon Uses Tissue Engineering To Grow Fashion Accessories

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Amy Congdon is a designer and researcher whose speculative “Biological Atelier” project brings fashion into the laboratory. The question driving her work is as follows: “What role will textile design play in the creation of biological products of the future?” (Source) Can we use tissue engineering to literally (and sustainably) grow fashion products, without creating waste, and without killing animals for their parts? As Congdon describes in the above video interview with Dezeen, her prospective collection would include a broach grafted onto the skin, and a collar attachment grown from an “an exotic mix of scales and leather.”

By combining textile design with tissue engineering, the possibilities for fashion products are virtually endless. “You could engineer specific properties into them,” Congdon explains. “They could be water repellent, or you could engineer the colour into them so you’re not having to dye them.” Furthermore — and here we enter the realm of a maybe-not-so-distant sci-fi future — Congdon hypothesizes that we could create hybrid materials, textiles deriving from combinations of organic tissues that have never occurred in nature.

While the conceptual pieces are beautiful, they may produce a sense of unease for some. Fashion, after all, usually involves commodities we put on and over our bodies, not ones that we graft on, and certainly not those made of materials birthed in a laboratory. This creates fascinating questions for the future of our bodies (and our consumer habits) — we could conceivably become hybridized by our fashion. As Congdon writes compellingly on her website:

“With one of the most controversial sets of materials becoming available for manipulation, i.e. our body, and those of other species, it could be argued that future fashion is grown from the ultimate commodity.” (Source)

Whether the concepts behind the “Biological Atelier” project fascinate or unnerve us (or both), Congdon points out the necessity for such speculative work. “We really need to acknowledge that we are living on just one planet, so we have finite resources,” she explains in the video. “So we really need to think about new ways that we might produce materials and products.” Such research, after all, may one day mean less suffering for the people, animals, and environments harmed by commodity production.

Visit Cogdon’s website to learn more. (Via Dezeen)

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Ondrej Konupcik’s Unique Tattoo Style Imitates Watercolor Brush Strokes That Come Alive On Your Skin

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Ondrej Konupcik is a Czech artist offering organic and original watercolor brush strokes and ink splatters on a tattoo. He depicts explosive impressive animals like hawks, foxes and wolves but also other simpler objects. Customers don’t choose from catalogs when they come to Ondrej Konupcik, each drawing has to be almost custom-made. 

The artist, who also goes by Ondrash, has to feel a connection to the subject before starting the process of tattooing. That’s the reason why he only takes care of one person per day. He wants to know on a deep level the story behind the tattoo. He traces directly on his customers to embrace their bodies and curves. He illustrates their wishes and desires from what they reveal.

A lot of the time mistaken for watercolor paintings applied directly to the skin, Ondrash’s tattoos has gained the appellation of compositional, figural art and today art brut tattoo. He gets his inspiration by browsing the web, getting ideas from other artists and painting daily for himself using watercolor and oil.
Ondrash also tried to graffiti. Enjoying the way the colors evolve in front of his eyes at a faster pace than when he tattoos, this could maybe his lead to a new project. (via deMilked).

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Eric Standley’s Stained Glass Cut Paper

 

Eric Standley’s work is made out of hundreds (yes hundreds!) of sheets of paper that are laser cut with dense geometric patterns. Looking like 3D stained glass from far away, these layered images transport you to another time and place with their meditative quality. What’s most fascinating about Standley’s works are the areas where the paper floats over from one side to the other creating deep caverns with up to 3 inches of depth.  (via visual news)

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Jefta Hoekendijk Glittering Photos Capture Vibrant Movements From Metallic-Coated Nude Models

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Photographer Jefta Hoekendijk’s series Aura features shimmering bodies in motion and dazzling colors. The feel of these images is electric as nude models are coated from head to toe with a metallic covering. Bright greens, purples, teals, and more radiate from their every movement.

The eye-catching effect was done without the use of post-production enhancements. “This is metal body paint and lighting effects directly made [from] shooting,” Hoekendijk writes. Any sort of movement will cause these trails of jewel-toned light. The result is a series of seductive and alluring photos where you’re focused on the invisible now made visible.

Hoekendijk experiments with painting, photography, sculpture, and video that’s centered around movement and the human body. Above all, his work is interested in the body as a vessel for expressing his varied artistic voice.

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Joan Ross Forges New Paintings Out Of Century-Old Works

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Australian artist Joan Ross manipulates paintings created by someone else, adding her own touches of highlighter yellow and fluoro orange. Sometimes, she animates these paintings. As Ross does this she simultaneously references a bevy of themes. They include the following: our attempt to civilize nature, imperialism, consumerism, our throwaway culture, global warming, tagging, naming, and claiming. It’s a tall order to engage these all of these things, so Ross uses historical paintings as a starting place.

Specifically, she uses the paintings of Joseph Lycett. He was an Australian painter producing work during the time that the British government colonized Australia (to use it to banish criminals, among other things), between 1788 and 1850. Taking his landscapes, lush and calming views of the ocean, Ross inserts loud, disruptive colors, graffiti, and symbols of invasion. A couple wearing hi vis yellow vests interrupts a group native residents. Other times, a similar couple vandalizes the natural environment. In many of Ross’ paintings and animations, subjects are destructive.

Lycett was a well-known painter, but ultimately found to be an impostor who forged his work. From a young age, this fact interested Ross, who mentions it in her artist statement. She writes:

As a child I was fascinated by the fact that the important colonial painter Joseph Lycett was a forger. In a sense I am continuing his tradition of taking something and forging something new out of it.

One of the reasons for Lycett’s fame lay in the fact he was one of the first to depicted the Aboriginal population engaged in traditional activities, and much of my work has on some level an element of the continuing dance of the races.

The mentality behind colonialism can manifest itself in many ways and the ongoing creep, nay, invasion of high vis yellow and fluoro orange are a modern-day example. I didn’t vote for these colours, yet they are everywhere!

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