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Théo Gènnitsakis

Théo Gennitsakis
Commercial illustrator Théo Gènnitsakis was born in Greece, and is now Creative Director of design agency LA SUNRISE in Paris whose modus operandi is “Audacity is the safest path” (check out their blog, it’s kinda funny). Well, it’s definitely safe to assume we know what Théo enjoys! And…safe to say that I feel a bit violated looking at these, haha.

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Cloud Made of Thousands of Lightbulbs at Nuit Blanche Festival in Calgary

Cloud is an installation piece from Calgary artist/filmmaker Caitlind Brown. The piece, part of the Nuit Blanche festival, involves 5,000 light bulbs, most of which are burnt out, that form a large cloud. Participants in the festival were able to pull on metal strings -rain- in order to illuminate sections of the “cloud”, giving off the impression of lightning. Imagine an entire landscape composed of lightbulbs- lightbulb sun, lightbulb trees, lightbulb mountains, etc. Lots of possibilities…

Click past the jump to see more photos of the piece. (via)

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Brian Moss’ Photographs Capture The BodyBuilder World Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

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kid bodybuilder

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scary body builder

Brian Moss, opened a gym in 1982. Better Bodies Gym, located in the heart of NYC, attracted bodybuilders from all over,and ever since 1997, Moss has casually photographed the leading competitors in the bodybuilding and fitness world.

The photographs are part of an on going series, a personal project, that gives insights to the bodybuilder’s life. Moss’ black and white portraits and action shots go beyond the bodybuilders’ physical appearance, and instead accentuates the human side of this ‘superficial’ business.

My images are unguarded, honest and voyeuristic. Whether they capture backstage scenes at the Mr. Olympia or private moments in a hotel room hours before the competitor steps out on stage, these images are imbued with an intimacy that had never been seen before.

Moss’ photographs have become very iconic, and they have influenced the way bodybuilders are currently portrayed in advertisements and mass media in general.

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Mandy Roos Reimagines Retro Sci-Fi Footwear

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Designer Mandy Roos injects psychedelic playfulness into her series, “Invasion of the Foot Carrier.” Calling upon the specters of miniature foam spaceships, Shatneresque choreography, and gold lamé, Roos’s conceptual line of footwear is a Technicolor tumble into the days of past future.

In some of her designs, Roos plays with gelatinous gloop and gel; in others, she draws inspiration of extraterrestrial explorers and their iconic caterpillar treads. Though the whole collection could be described as whimsical, there’s also a sense of optimism: Roos describes the project as “an inspirational vision meant for the footwear industry.” Her designs are imbued the kind of lighthearted curiosity that defined the years when people still thought the World of Tomorrow was a light on the horizon.

With names like “Aurora Glow,” “Stargazer,” and “Moon Crawler,” Roos embraces the neon cheesiness of retro sci-fi glory. Her designs might not be realistic, but they’re not meant to be. And after so many dystopian futures, both imagined and predicted, it’s refreshing to see such bold cheerfulness. (via Flavorwire)

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Artist Applies Paint Solvents To Photographs To Create Eerie And Surreal Images

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There is little to be found on mixed media artist Kuinexs, who claims this name as an identity and artform. For his “Photodissolutions,” the artist applies paints solvents to photographs, creating a chemical reaction that smears and blurs the colors in the photograph. The effect is at once haunting and a bit disturbing. Some of the elements of the original photograph peek through or remain untouched backgrounds to the dissolutions, presenting a jarring juxtaposition of realism and surrealism. The subjects in Kuinexs’ images are often obscured, and only the curves of faces and bodies and flesh-tone colors exist as evidence of a subject’s presence. (via juxtapoz)

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Maria Imaginario

Freelance illustrator Maria Imaginario creates  interactive illustrations infused with personality and humor.  I particularly love her illustration with the dancing poo man!  Really awesome stuff.

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Alain Vonck’s pixelated Wallpaper

I’m absolutely loving the 80’s retro graphics of recent design school graduate Alain Vonck. His graphic wallpapers  with imagery and icons from the early era of the world wide web have to be my favorite, making me want to cover every single square inch of my home with pixelated roses, hourglasses, and type!

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Beautiful Fordite Stones Made With Layered Paint From Old Car Factories

fordite-1Image via Talyer Jewelryfordite-2Image via m e sweeney  fordite-41Image via Forditefordite-31image via Nebbie

Years ago, the American automotive industry was an unparalleled success not only in productivity, but also in the quality of their beautiful car designs. Unbeknownst to these automotive designers, they were also creating something beautiful that would last long after the processes they pioneered went extinct. Fordite (or Motor Agate, or Detroit Agate) as it has become known, was created by the process of hand-spraying cars with enamel-paint. A byproduct of the process, paint slag called “rough” was baked in the ovens, which hardened the automotive paint, creating layered slabs which crafty autoworkers realized could easily be polished, much like the naturally occurring agates they so resembled. Since this process has long been , these remaining stones have found a particular following, as they can never be created again.

Johnny Strategy, who documented much of the story for Colossal, writes, “Old car factories had a harmful impact on the environment, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, land and water. But it wasn’t all ugly. Oddly enough, one of the by-products of car production was Fordite, also known as Detroit agate. The colorful layered objects take their name from agate stones for their visual resemblance. But instead of forming from microscopically crystallized silica over millions of years, Fordite was formed from layers of paint over several tens of years. Back in the day, old automobile paint would drip onto the metal racks that transported cars through the paint shop and into the oven. The paint was hardened to a rock-like state thanks to high heats from the baking process. As the urban legend goes, plant workers would take pieces home in their lunch pails as a souvenir for their wife or kids.” (via mymodernmet, fordite.com, colossal)

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