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Daughters Of Devotion: The Art Of Dressing For The Occasion

Daughters of Devotion Daughters of DevotionDaughters of Devotion Daughters of Devotion

“Nighttwins” Laura and Kindra have been helping keep the New York nightlife scene alive for over seven years. Better known as Daughters of Devotion, this pair originally from Seattle, dress up, act out, perform, inspire and create installations. Combining their interests in romantic/fetish fashion and showroom/glam drag, these two extroverts quickly bonded over a mutual love of creating twin-themed costumes.

Setting out to be more than just colorful characters, Daughters of Devotion have created a brand and an unusual type of business for themselves. They have performed with Cher, been nominated for a Glammy, featured on the cover of Next magazine and have even lain on the beach in Hawaii with Carmen Electra. Proving to be much more than just part of the ‘club creature family’, DOFD have surpassed their own expectations of where their flamboyant passions would lead them.

“We draw inspiration from so many sources. Couture designers through the ages, vintage patterns, showgirl pageantry, Dolly Parton, John Willie, nightlife artists present and past, fetish, cartoons — you name it…. The looks we conceptualize, create and present to the world are living works of art to be admired for just a moment in time; especially because we rarely repeat looks. “

Loaded up with jewels, face paint plastered on, eyelashes applied, belts buckled tightly, and stockings hoicked up high, Daughters of Devotion are a celebration of the wonders that go on after dark. Equal parts entertainment, and artistic expression, these two women are their own subculture, their own art genre, and certainly are a sight for sore eyes.
(Via Huff Post)

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Starkly Graceful Black And White Photos Of Icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography9 icebergs

Jan Erik Waider icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography8 icebergs

The photographs of Jan Erik Waider seem to turn natural formations into abstract sculptures.  His series Ice on Black captures icebergs in stark black and white photography.  The textures, movement, and shape of the floating ice is surprisingly sculptural.  The graceful masses of ice juxtaposed against the larger field of open sea nearly seem like a painterly decision.  Waider is a graphic designer by trade, but his passion if for photography and the northern landscape.  He specifically captures the majority of his photographs in and near Greenland and Iceland.

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Nancy Rubins’ Transforms Children’s Playground Toys Into Large-Scale Explosive Sculptures

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal’, 2014. Aluminum, stainless steel, 204 x 500 x 281 inches, (518.2 x 1.270 x 713.7 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Chunkus Majoris’, 2013. Aluminum and stainless steel, 150 x 192 x 145 inches, (381 x 487.7 x 368.3 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Paquito’, 2013 Aluminum and stainless steel, 132 x 168 x 96 inches, (335.3 x 426.7 x 243.8 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Spiral Ragusso’, 2013. Aluminum, stainless steel, 134 x 228 x 187 inches, (340.4 x 579.1 x 475 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

Nancy Rubins‘ grandiose sculpture exhibition Our Friend Fluid Metal is open to public at the Gagosian Gallery, New York. Famous for her explosive installations featuring re-purposed objects, this time Rubins’ transforms old equipment from children’s playgrounds into dynamic large-scale floating structures.

The title of the exhibition refers to materials Rubins’ used to create her surrealist sculptures. The monumental figures are constructed from recycled aluminum playground toys. But the story goes back even further, as the playful critters (elephants, ponies, giraffes, etc.) were made with aluminum from WW2 military planes. Sturdy and, at that time, cheap material was perfect for making thick children’s playground equipment. For the artist, this flux was a natural inspiration.

“Even before the airplane parts the aluminum was a part of the earth and before it was part of the earth it was probably parts of stars and meteors and things that slammed into the earth.”

The exhibition consists of four massive sculptures, all compound through a system of steel trusses and tension cables. Dimensions vary, but the largest measures 17 x 42 x 24 feet. Despite that, Rubins’ works ten to evoke a sense of lightness and stillness, like someone had pushed a Pause button in the middle of an explosion. Her expressionist take towards unwieldy constructions reveals the fair line between rigid and gracefully fluid.

The exhibition runs until September 13, 2014 at Gagosian Gallery, New York.

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Plus-size Painting: Abstractions Created With Massive Unconventional Paint Brushes

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Fabienne Verdier paints with unconventionally large tools. She creates her own brushes, made from substances like sheep hair, duck down, or horse hair, sometimes reaching 6 feet long and over 150 pounds. The brushes are suspended with rope, and then handled physically, or with the help of a pair of bicycle handlebars. Trained under a Chinese painting tradition, Verdier frequently uses black to create her paintings, but will often transgress this tradition by using bright, earthy colors. Preparing ascetically before each piece and practicing the art of spontaneous expression form the basis of her work.

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Against The Grain- A Charity Auction Beniffiting Emerging Artists

Against The Grain

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Them Thangs Magazine

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Longtime B/D friend Justin Blyth just released the Them-Thangs magazine, a massive folded poster featuring a gang of insane images, photography, and design. If you’re a fan of the popular blog then make sure to pick this up. Congrats Justin!

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Nelson Balaban

XTCNelson Balaban is an illustrator/designer working in Sao Paulo. At 20 years of age, he has worked with some impressive clients including Adidas, Diesel, Coca-Cola, and Oakley. He is now the art director working for Cisma @ Paranoid BR. For a bigger list of his clients and more of his work check out his site or follow him on the Behance network.

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Christopher McKenney’s Surreal Photographs Are Disturbingly Beautiful

Christopher McKenney - Photography

Christopher McKenney - Photography

Christopher McKenney - Photography

Christopher McKenney - Photography

 

 

The surreal photographs by Christopher McKenney are haunting, as a (mostly) faceless figure interacts with a deserted environment. The desaturated images are shot in the middle of the woods, a corn field, a lake, and back country roads. Sometimes, we see a ghost. Other times, a man is lit on fire. Whatever the situation, McKenney crafts a quietly desperate image.

The photographer recently told art blog iGNANT that he one day found himself in the woods with nothing but a sheet, chair, and frame. He placed the sheet over his head and photoshopped his body out. He tells iGnant, I like taking away identity when photographing and to leave people thinking. “I only make the photos I do to express myself and what other people see or think is up to them, as long as I make them feel anything I’m ok with that.”

Personally, I experience cognitive dissonance when looking at McKenney’s work. I find a lot of these images disturbing yet beautifully composed.. For instance, the photo Fragile Perspective (above) features someone with a burning box over their head. Formally, the colors are rich and the orange of the fire is stunning against the blues, browns, and grays. But, then I study the content of the photograph and realize that it depicts someone who is essentially set on fire.

Not all of McKenney’s photographs are like that. Other times, they are simply whimsical and nonsensical. In Let Go, a suitcase with a balloon tied to the handle stays on the ground as its owner floats away. Another photograph has a chair in an empty field with a pair of hands (only hands, no body), infinitely holding a mirror. It’s these photographs I enjoy more – ones that are odd, but don’t communicate utter despair. (Via iGNANT)

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