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Artwork Of The Day: Akif Hakan

Akif Hakan’s photography portfolio is full of both personal and commercial fashion photography. He’s got many beautiful images on his site but the image above captured my eye. I love the optical effect of the hand disappearing behind the hair. Akif also has great series on glamour goths, urban fairies, and other bizarre fashionistas from around the world.

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Milano Chow’s Neglected Objects

Milano Chow‘s drawings are subtle and contemplative. One of the most striking elements in the work is the indelible sadness of human figures and the seemingly neglected objects that surround them. Plants and flowers reoccur but they are often wilted. The people inhabiting these snap shots mirror their belongings. They remain cluttered, isolated and damaged.

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Katherine Akey’s Stunning, Dreamy Photographs Of Natural World Wonders

Katherine Akey- Photograph Katherine Akey- PhotographKatherine Akey- PhotographKatherine Akey- Photograph

Katherine Akey’s works traces the delicacies of life on this planet in various ways. Through photograms and photographs, she narrates the whimsical beauty of nature. These smokey, sparkling greys are from a body of work titled Aurora, where she captured the mysterious movement of the night sky. Her penchant for unearthing, discovering, and a curiosity about the sacred aspects of voyage have imbedded in her a unique way of viewing the world, one she projects masterfully from glass lens to gelatin. Outfitting herself to visit Svalbard in the next year, she will no doubt deliver a new body of work that is even more sophisticated and compelling.

Akey is a beautiful writer, and her this excerpt from her blog shows her motivations and what led her to commit to the upcoming Arctic Circle Residency in Svalbard. Beautiful and compelling, it reads like poetry:

“These questions and their associated emotional valences could be analyzed using the machines and tools of a scientist; I choose, however, to use the events of the past, the texts left behind, the myths generated, and, hopefully, my own foray into those parts of the world as material for art making. My work also confronts the reality that adventure as we have long thought of it is just about snuffed out. Astronauts go to the safety of space stations instead of venturing into the infinite universe, and robots have taken the place of humans to explore the dusty surface of Mars. The ambitions of so many of these men who went north to explore were complicated and compelling; what drove them to embark, what kindled the hope that kept them alive, and what they give credit to for their success once they return are all completely different things. The North Pole itself is elusive and misleading; there’s a geographic north pole, a magnetic north pole, the celestial North Pole, and a northern pole of inaccessibility. The Arctic, unlike the Antarctic, is a frozen ocean, not a continent; there’s no land mass, just sea ice. The mythic explorer hero is also a foggy, misleading concept; these men were egotistical, driven by ambition, and many of them died miserable, needless deaths alone. All of my interests and works come out of this deep respect for the Human; I see it so clearly in these fevered moments of triumph-cum-horror, like the World Wars or the Golden Age(s) of exploration.”

(Excerpt published with permission from artist)

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Murat Palta Depicts Famous Movies In The Style Of The Ottoman Empire

A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange

Alien

Alien

Inception

Inception

Star Wars

Star Wars

Combining Western cinema and traditional Ottoman motifs, Turkish artist Murat Palta designed a series of images that blend the style of the Ottoman empire with films like Pulp Fiction, Alien, and Clockwork Orange. They are made to look historic and aged, and once you see past that, Palta has illustrated some of the iconic scenes of the particular film.

The Ottoman Empire, also known as the Turkish Empire, was one of the longest running empires in history. Palta’s works recall the Miniature Style of the Ottomans, which was a part of Ottoman book arts that included illumination, calligraphy, paper marbling, and bookbinding. Miniatures were usually not signed because they were not created entirely by one person. Production included the head painter who designed the composition, and his apprentices that drew the contours and then painted the scene.

Like the Miniature Style, Palta has included stylized two-dimensional characters, flattened views of architecture, and a lot of contrasting patterns. He references the Ottoman tradition while still making it his own – After all, I don’t think that the old illuminations included men beating someone senseless with a nightstick or a tiny green Yoda. (Via That’s Like, Whoa!)

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Zlatan Vehabovic

zlatan_vehabovic

What do river raft tents, taxidermy Paul Frank characters, and crumbling cubeoids have in common? Zlatan Vehabovic! This Croatian painter has some interesting subject matter. I’m not entirely sure what it all means but it looks right pretty.

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Alex Fischer

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Toronto-based creator Alex Fischer seems to prefer images laden with layers. Each image screams with a smashing of cultures and a tearing of borders. Fischer questions ownership in a similar manner to Richard Prince. Each image shows patience with a strident attention to detail, as each pressing of images goes further and further into a world all its own.

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New work by Lehel Kovacs

 

Illustrator Lehel Kovacs creates charmingly simple illustrations & text that look sort of like wood block prints. New works just added to his portfolio!

 

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Paintings Made Of Real Human Ashes Immortalize The Dead

painting with human ashespainting with human ashespainting with human ashes

When the artist Adam Brown paints a portrait, he sprinkles cremated human remains into his palette, hoping to memorialize the dead in a way that celebrates their individualism and vitality; each image, most commissioned by the loved one of a recent decedent, serves as an alternative to the traditional urn.

After Brown’s clients submit a sampling of sandy ashes, the artist dons a pair of gloves and mixes them with paint to create personalized renditions and imaginings of the dead that span from straight black and white portraiture to dreamy colored abstractions. He carefully preserves any and all unused ashes, ultimately returning them to his client.

The project, titled Ashes to Art, poignantly aims to reconstruct the deconstructed body, fixing delicate cremains with glue and paint; in this way, his paintings work to incapsulate the entirety of the human body and lifetime into one sly smile, one glint of the eye, or one splash of color.

Brown’s ambitious body of work subverts morbid thoughts on human remains, adopting the medium to create shockingly cheerful faces, heavily textured hands, and vividly yellow flames. The idea of permanence figures prominently into the work; not unlike the popular ritualistic scattering of ashes over the sea, his landscape paintings elegantly incorporate the corporeal into the seemingly eternal earth, everlasting sky, or immovable mountains.

With each work, the artist ensures the respectful remembrance of human life with a simple inscription; lest a piece get lost or auctioned and taken for an average painting, he writes a disclaimer on its backing: this work of art contains human remains. (via Daily Mail and Oddity Central)

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