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Lee Hadwin Creates Art While Sleepwalking

Lee Hadwin drawing2 Lee Hadwin drawing8

Lee Hadwin drawing5

Some artists are so talented they seem to be able to do it in their sleep.  Lee Hadwin, though, can only do it in his sleep.  Since he was an early teenager, Hadwin would draw or paint on tables, walls, clothes all while sleep walking.  While awake he would show no sign of interest or talent in art making.  Now Hadwin is prepared at night – he sets art materials aside before going to bed.  Much of his work is elegantly simple, while other pieces are strangely intricate.  Peculiar symbols and recurring shapes seem to appear in much of his work making one wonder whats going on in the mind of sleeping Lee Hadwin.

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Mark Boellaard

Return to Atlantis-2007

Amsterdam artist Mark Boellaard has a simple approach to collage. He uses new techniques marked by overtones of Surrealism. Follow his blog for more works by him. Or, for those fellow Flickr users, follow him on Flickr!

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Aiko @ Joshua Liner Gallery

 

 

Born in Tokyo and living in NYC since 1996, well known as founding member of art collective FAILE. In 2006 she started her solo career and has been exhibiting her stencil/silk screen paintings in major cities such as NY, LA, London, Berlin, Tokyo and Barcelona.

 

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LEE MATERAZZI’s Manipulated Bodies Crammed Into Uncomfortable Spaces

Lee Materazzi uses her body to manipulate her photographs (as opposed to giving in to digital manipulation). In her newest series she explores the thin line between finding oneself and losing oneself. She references artists like Charles Ray and Anna Mendieta as she “attempts to achieve a resolution of the body’s role within contemporary art.”

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jeremy blincoe’s Fleeting Embrace

Australian photographer Jeremy Blincoe’s Fleeting Embrace series places children in phenomenal settings and situations.

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Giveaway: Ladies, Time for a New Purse?

ziggy_moop_purse_giveaway_beautifuldecay

Are you tired of totin’ around your goods in a trashed out purse? If you’re guilty of carting your art supplies, clothes, overnight gear or even puppy in a pimped out hole-filled plastic bag (as B/D mascot, Ziggy, models above)…..then it might be time for a new purse! Thankfully Beautiful/Decay and Moop are coming to your rescue! We are giving away one Market Bag (images after the jump), which features tons of pouches, d-rings for cell phones and keys, zipper pockets and more. All you have to do is send a photo of your wrecked purse (you can get creative and make one as well, like we did). Most horrifically un-stylish bag will get swapped out with a new one in any color of your choice, ’cause, we’ll probably feel sorry for you.

Submit photos to: contactbd@beautifuldecay.com

Title Subject of email: Trashed Bag= New Bag

Contest Deadline: Friday August 14th, 1pm PST

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Illumination Ink

Illumination Ink

Illumination Ink hails from Newcastle, Australia, adding another international post to our Around The World Day here at BD (not really). Heath Killen contrasts his beige-y website with his sometimes bold, sometimes colorful, sometimes remixed images. I really like the use of typography with his illustrations, and the vintage look to his collage-like works.

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The Lives Of Miniature Cement People By Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Via Twisted Sifter: Isaac Cordal is a Spanish artist that has been working on his own projects since 1999. His ongoing series entitled Cement Eclipses began in art school in 2002 but he didn’t start placing them on the streets until 2006, with his first piece laid in the city of Vigo, Spain.

Cordal makes the tiny sculptures in his apartment/home studio. He has placed them in major cities all around Europe including: London, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Milan, Berlin and Brussels. “Small interventions in big cities,” is how Cordal characterized Cement Eclipses.

In a 2012 interview with Agenda Magazine, Cordal explains:

‘Our gaze is so strongly focused on beautiful, large things, whereas the city also contains zones that have the potential to be beautiful, or that were really beautiful in the past, which we overlook. I find it really interesting to go looking for those very places and via small-scale interventions to develop a different way of looking at our behaviour as a social mass.'”

Check out a previous post about Cordal’s strainer street art here.

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