Get Social:

Noah Scalin’s Skulls Made Out Of Mundane Objects

Noah Scalin lives and works in Richmond Virginia. His work consists of various skulls created from mundane objects such as wine corks, bed sheets, and tea bags to name a few. His daily creations culminated in the Skull-A-Day art project and blog in which Noah created and photographed one skull a day for a year. His latest skull creation is entitled “Dead Media”. Made from 497 VHS videocassettes, the installation comments on materials that were once considered cutting edge. Scalin’s clever variations on the skull remind us of fragility while inspiring us to see mundane objects as opportunities to playfully manipulate.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Dean Sullivan

DeanSullivan3

Dean Sullivan is like that doodling space-obsessed boy who sat behind you in kindergarten and claimed he really, honestly, for real had an alien abduction experience once and monsters living in his closet.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Felipe Avila

ad-exp

Felipe Avila is an art director and motion graphics guru. His work has been seen on numerous TV spots, working with numerous clients such as National Geographic Channel and FX Networks. Some of the projects he has worked on include rebranding Fox Crime, and motion graphics for
Nissan, Minute Made, and Mitsubishi.

Currently Trending

B/D + Shirts on Sale Giveaway- “Lucky Threes!”

In celebration of launching our Spring ’09 line on our online shop, we are doing an exclusive giveaway with one of our favorite apparel sites, Shirts on Sale.

 
We’re calling it “Lucky Threes” because 3 lucky entrants, picked for the most part at random, will each win a shirt (that’s 3 teeshirts) if they can come up with 3 bullet points or examples of what our newest, relaunched issue, Book 1, will look like.

 

To enter, please send Shirts on Sale your three answers via their handy-dandy anti-spam email automator before 12:01 PM EST Sunday May 22th. Only one entry per person will be accepted and your first guess counts!

Currently Trending

Gerald Collings’ Meat Faces Of Death

Gerald Collings‘ paintings are  a perfect mix between Francis Bacon and your local butcher shop. These layered paintings look like they have been to hell and back. With images of skinned faces, torn apart rib cages, and bodies in various states of decay, they have become the ultimate test for how grotesque an image can be while still remaining a rich and seductive work of art.

Currently Trending

Laura Bird

Laura Bird

Laura Bird, out of London, makes beautiful Norse-Children’s Book Illustration hybrids by illustrating with pen and ink and paint and even papier-mâché. Her illustrations evoke a bit of whimsy with such toothy faces and happy colors, crossing over from paper in the the three-dimensional world.

Currently Trending

Felix Schramm Tears Down Walls And Rebuilds Them As Striking Sculptures

Felix Schramm - Dry Wall Sculpture  Felix Schramm - Dry Wall Sculpture

Felix Schramm - Dry Wall Sculpture

Felix Schramm - Dry Wall Sculpture

German artist Felix Schramm likes to make sculptures that confuse you. He uses pieces of drywood, paint, steel frames and paint to recreate parts of architecture matching the space that they inhabit, but are very different than what you would expect. His highly formalized sculptures are a bit like architecture that has stopped pretending to hold itself up. They can be huge chunks of material that have been dumped in the room from a construction site by accident, or shoved through the wall like an art install that has gone bad. Resembling crumpled paper, or layers of torn posters on a lamp post, Schramm makes subtle comments about space, form, structure and the nature of materials with his work.

These group of photos are from a series called ‘Intersection’, and act exactly as that – they intersect, interrupt and divide the space like we wouldn’t expect. The sculptural fragments are reminders of the temporal spaces we inhabit – that architecture is only a fabrication and is easily destructible. These splinters of construction serve to disorientate the viewer. Schramm is able to warp our understanding of these mundane spaces purely by placing chunks of industrial material where they shouldn’t be.

The destroyed fragments of drywall wrapping themselves around existing columns and leaning butted up against pristine gallery walls are beautifully disturbing. Schramm’s work also features formalized ceramics, pieces made from plaster and paint, and smaller versions of ruined architecture. His installations act as a visual reminder of the grey area between chaos and order. These large scale replicas are both gently delicate and immensely strong. To see more contradictions and opposites at play against each other in Schramm’s work, go here

Currently Trending

Jeff Koons And Other Art Stars Bring Awareness To Scarcity Of Clean Water Around The World

Mary Jordan- Water Tank Project Mary Jordan- Water Tank Project Mary Jordan- Water Tank ProjectMary Jordan- Water Tank Project

Mary Jordan’s Water Tank Project brings to the New York skyline a beautiful and pertinent reminder that water is, in most respects, sacred. The project has brought glorious eye candy into the periphery, yet its first and foremost mission is to spread awareness regarding the dire water situation the majority of this world experiences.

The backstory to the effort reads like a movie: filmmaker Mary Jordan was working on a documentary in Ethiopia back in 2007. Three months in she became deathly ill from accidentally ingesting contaminated water. Nursed back to health by the women of the village she was living in, Jordan survived and was urged by these women to thank them through working to increase awareness on the water crisis within their country and the world.

One day, while back in New York, Jordan gazed up at a water tower and had an epiphany: “They’re like these little temples that hold water,” she thought, and realized the inherent symbolism of the structure itself, and the potential power to communicate that it held. Thus, the Water Tank Project was born. Jordan founded Word Above The Street, with the intent of utilizing the city’s water-related infrastructure to showcase water-related art and increase awareness.

The project gained an impressive level of momentum as artists Jeff Koons, Maya Lin, Andy Goldsworthy, Jeppe Hein, John Baldessari, and many, many others have signed up to produce graphic wraps for the over 100 water towers included in the project. With the tag line: Art Above NYC, Water Above All, Jordan is doing a remarkable job at fulfilling her promise, and getting you to think about your relationship with water and what effects the conservation of water can mean to those in countries less fortunate than ours.

Currently Trending