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Andrea Myers

Andrea Myers sculptures made out of fabric and torn paper collages are dense layered works full of texture and rainbow bright color schemes.

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Incredible Chewing Gum Sculptures By Maurizio Savini

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The first question Maurizio Savini is asked about his work is one he hates to hear: does he chew every piece of gum he uses to make his sculptures? He admits this question is very annoying, but if everybody is still genuinely interested, then no – no he doesn’t chew the gum. Instead he has two full time assistants unwrapping each stick of gum and melting the pink sticky stuff into layers of usable material. Savini begins his lengthy process by layering the sheets of gum around plaster molds which give his sculptures stability and shape.

Working with the gum for over a decade, he has created some amazing pieces. One sculpture  – ‘La Lupa‘ (the figure who nursed the founders of Savini’s birthplace of Rome back to health) is made from 14 kg of chewing gum. He has animals bearing different flags, business men clutching pillows, chandeliers and women’s shoes among many other things. His work is usually loaded with some sort of socially and/or politically focused message.

He says chewing gum has a unique cultural context. It is connected to art history, industry and world history, and is a loaded symbol for Savini. He says after being introduced to Europe when WW2 was ending, the material became a symbol (along with Coca Cola and nylon stockings) of a new era.

When Savini began making his chewing gum sculptures, he has the misfortune of several pieces disintegrating. He now combines the gum with formaldehyde and anti-biotics to preserve it, so the high sugar content doesn’t destroy the pieces. You can see some of his new pieces at the upcoming Art-Southampton, July 9-13, 2015, or find out more about how he makes his creations in the video above.

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Li Hui

Li Hui, a conceptual artist born in the (a term which is often used here) post-70’s decade, creates a lot of his work with automobiles and “custom laser array, Laser Night Module, waterjet cutting machines, and laser engraving machines” in his arsenal. He’s even welded two front parts of a car together and turned yet another car into a pink sofa. Check out his video interview on The Creator’s Project.

And yes, I am alive and well in China!

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Quayola Digitally Deconstructs Baroque Masterpieces

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Strata #4 – Site-Specific Installation from Quayola on Vimeo.

Strata #4 is a two channel video by the artist known simply as Quayola.  For the video, Quayola used images of two grand altarpieces by Rubens and Van Dyck.  He worked with an HDR photographer to obtain huge 20,000 by 20,000 pixel images of the work.  Then using unbelievable computing power and algorithms Quayloa investigates each masterpiece’s underlying structure, composition, and color.  Strata #4 at turn resembles 20th century abstract renditions of the baroque work.  Yet his video squarely part of a New Aesthetic, part of a 21st century sensibility.

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JeanPaul Mallozzi

Beautiful and mysterious drawings by illustrator JeanPaul Mallozzi.

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Neo Collage Mess Is Tired And True…

Printing spreads from the Hardland/Heartland book Us Doves, Earth Flag, and A— Road by Eric Timothy Carlson.


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Mindo Cikanavicius’ Comedic Series “Bubbleissimo” Questions The Meaning Of Masculinity

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New York based artist Mindo Cikanavicius photographs portraits of men with foam “facial hair.” Within this series, titled Bubbleissimo, (perhaps making a play on the word “machismo”), the artist distorts the notion of masculinity through a comedic display of the growing obsession with groomed facial hair. His work aims to speak about the fragility and absurdity of what “manliness” means, depicting it as being just as allusive and indefinite as the bubbles meant to represent it.  These works portray the sitters in a sort of kitschy, glamor portrait style, engulfed in one side of sky blue and one side of bubble gum pink, the colors used to denote gendered objects. His series mocks the need to define and portray what it means to be masculine, and, through what seems at first glance to be an overtly serious series, successfully, upon further inspection, invites in a air of making fun of itself. Once it becomes clear that this facial hair is in fact made of bubbles, the work switches from being a strange cataloging of men, to a witty depiction of gender norms. His artist statement notes that “Mindo is focused creating story based unexpected moments with touch of cinematic drama, humor and mystery. His work is a blend of ideas, imagination, observations, experiences and emotions into making intriguing constructed reality photographs.”

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Julianne Moore as Famous Works of Art

Hollywood, fashion, and art history collide in the photographs of Peter Linderbergh of Julianne Moore for a 2008 issue of Harpers Bazaar. Linderbergh photographs the talented actress side-by-side some of the most iconic and famous images of women pulled from art history. See Moore as an Egon Schiele, John Currin, Gustav Klimt, Richard Prince (pictured above), and more. All after the jump.

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